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09/08/2010

Jill Baker Gower – ode grinçant à la « féminité »

Classé dans : COUP DE COEUR,Gal. Facere (US),Jill BAKER GOWER (US),USA — bijoucontemporain @ 0:05

Masters of Fine Arts, Jewelry/Metals – MFA exhibition - 2006
(ASU- Arizona State University-School of Art)

au début ça commence « bien », « classique » je dirais … et puis, petit à petit, un humour grinçant s’immisce, et ça dégénère ……… et ça devient délectable ! :-)

« My work revolves around how women of today are influenced by society’s concept of “ideal beauty” as portrayed by the media.  Advertisements, commercials, stores, magazines, and television shows aim to make women believe that by using or wearing certain products they will come closer to “physical perfection”.  The jewelry and metalwork I create helps the wearer become closer to this ideal beauty, but also points to the humor in contemporary American society’s definition of perfection.  The objects I make often contain prosthetics or embellishments that can be applied to or worn on the body such as make-up or fingernails.  By turning make-up containers into wearable objects, the wearer is able to conveniently yet obsessively look in the mirror, reapply lipstick, blush, or powder numerous times in a day.  The burden of wearing such large or uncomfortable objects on one’s body parallels the onerous practice of reaching physical perfection.
 Certain people may be persuaded that in order to reach a particular status or to be accepted and considered beautiful by society, they need outrageous and at times physically painful surgeries, prosthetics, and injections.  Under select circumstances, sadly, this may be true.  Objects such as silver and gold teeth, fake eyelashes, and Botox compacts comment on these more invasive practices.  There are a multitude of contemporary advertisements for teeth veneers, eyelash enhancers, and facial injections that make people believe these prosthetics and procedures are vital life necessities.
Historically and currently, just as physical beauty can show or determine a person’s social status and power, so can jewelry.  Gold, jewels, and pearls can sometimes show a person’s wealth and status.  In order to signify that the pieces are valuable and precious, I use mediums such as silver, gold, pearls, and lustrous fabrics. By the use of these materials my pieces reference historical metalwork, specifically silver toiletry and make-up items.   Although my jewelry has humorous undertones and is not always practical and functional, it maintains its beauty and value, a quality that many women deem important in life. » (Jill Baker Gower)

Jill Baker Gower - ode grinçant à la 200600764 dans Gal. Facere (US)Jill Baker Gower Lipstick Necklace, sterling silver; mirror; lipstick, 2004 (close & open)
Blush RingJill Baker Gower Blush Ring; close, sterling silver; mirror; brush; blush, 2005
Jill Baker Gower - graduate work - Blush Ring; displayed open, sterling silver; mirror; brush; blush, 2005 (open)Jill Baker Gower Blush Ring; displayed open, sterling silver; mirror; brush; blush, 2005
Jill Baker Gower- Powder Puff Ring (close & open)
Aphrodisiac Rose PomanderJill Baker GowerAphrodisiac Rose Pomander, pewter; sterling silver; feathers; rose oil, 2006

Jill Baker Gower - Add Some Sparkle to that Smile' -  Detail of Teeth, MDF; acrylic case; jewelry boxes; satin pillows; sterling silver; 18K;24K gold plate; CZ; enamel paint, 2005‘Add Some Sparkle to that Smile’ -  Detail of Teeth, MDF; acrylic case; jewelry boxes; satin pillows; sterling silver; 18K;24K gold plate; CZ; enamel paint, 2005

Jill Baker Gower -  Botox Injection Compact, sterling silver; brass; syringe; vial, 2006 (open)
Botox Injection Compact, sterling silver; brass; syringe; vial, 2006

Dans la continuité de cette idée, et de cet esprit, elle a participé en octobre 2008 à l’exposition « Girls Play Games » à la Facere Gallery

 Jill Baker Gower, 'Glamour Gem Locket Brooch' in argentium sterling silver, feather boa, magnifying mirror, brass, and plastic gem. Jill Baker Gower, 'Glamour Gem Necklace' in aregentium sterling silver, vintage glass, and plastic gem.
Jill Baker Gower - ‘Glamour Gem Locket Brooch’- argentium sterling silver, feather boa, magnifying mirror, brass,  plastic gem
 Jill Baker Gower - ‘Glamour Gem Necklace’ – argentium sterling silver, vintage glass, plastic gem.

 Jill Baker Gower, 'Pink Roller Necklace' in argentium sterling silver and foam hair rollers. Jill Baker Gower, 'Pink Roller Brooch' in argentium sterling silver, fine silver, foam hair curler, and stainless steel.
Jill Baker Gower – ‘Pink Roller Necklace’ – argentium sterling silver , foam hair rollers
Jill Baker Gower - ‘Pink Roller Brooch’ – argentium sterling silver, fine silver, foam hair curler,  stainless steel.

Simon COTTRELL – are we looking at small machines, or … animals ?

Classé dans : Australie (AU),Gal. Funaki (AU),metal,Simon COTTRELL (AU),www KitandCaboodle — bijoucontemporain @ 0:04

I create objects that address their nature or utility only by achieving an honesty towards it. I often use shapes that present various allusions while never overtly depicting any single subject. These pieces are drawn from an attempt to embody two subtle paradoxes… the possibilities of a tenuous calm or of complex simplicities. The edges of simple forms are broken so that the defining outline is unclear; simple allusions to nature are broken by an obvious man-made production.(Simon Cottrell at Gallery Funaki)

Simon COTTRELL - are we looking at small machines, or ... animals ? dans Australie (AU) 368
Simon Cottrell - brooch ‘Five dimples two whites and a tail’ 2007 – Monel, stainless steel, plastic coating

« In recent work I am aiming to trigger various quiet yet resonant contradictions that blur our abilty to make clear sense of the things we see. There is both simplicity and complexity, static and growth, volume and lightness, randomness and order, monotone and dynamic, tension and calm, in the forms and structural details. Initially appearing quite austere, the more time we engage with each piece the less definitive they become. If there is a possibility of a clear line between my work being perceived as one way or another, I will often try to sit on that line. Exactly where that line lies however all depends on the attentiveness of the viewer. When we are presented with forms that are evocative of something familiar yet ambiguous, our curiosity is triggered and our visual engagement is lengthened…  it is never clear, are we looking at small machines or floral bouquets?… monsters or clouds?… plants or animals ? » (Simon Cottrell on NoovoEditions)

 dans Gal. Funaki (AU)
Simon Cottrell (Australia) – ‘Six tall dimples radiating through/behind’ brooch – 2008

 dans metal
Simon Cottrell - ‘Back and forth in tempers’ brooch -  2010  (from his page on kit&caboodle)

 dans Simon COTTRELL (AU)
Simon Cottrell - ‘Bang in/at plant’ – Brooch- monel with powder-coating-  2008

370 dans www KitandCaboodle
Simon Cottrell object ‘Awkward’ 2005 – Monel (15 x 15 x 13 cm )

3692
Simon Cottrell brooch ‘Tall dimple, blobs’ 2007 – Monel stainless steel
Simon Cottrell brooch ’100mm deep concave circle’ 2008 – Monel enamel paint

5
Simon Cottrell brooch ‘Variable focus black’ 2007 Monel (chemical blackened), stainless steel

 

« What we might see as being ‘simple’ always has an underlying ‘complexity’. What we sense as being ‘calm’ is in actual fact, only a balance of ‘tensions’ at a level beneath our immediate perception. Our perception of things as being one way or another depends on the level of our sensory attentiveness.
The visual ‘simplicity’ of a single leaf contains a complexity within its moisture laden cellular structure. It could also be said that each singular cell is ‘simple’ in relation to the complex structure it lies within. And of course further again that singular cell has a deeper atomic complexity in relation to the singularity of the cell in itself.
Complex or simple…Calm or tense…Serious or playful…Ordered or random… Blurred or clear… Singular or multiple… Static or growing…Flat or with volume…Man-made or natural…
If there is a clear line between my work being one way or another, I will often try to sit on that line.
Exactly where that line lies however, all depends on the attentiveness of the viewer.
The degree of our sensory attentiveness of course plays a fundamental role in the human creative process.
It is sensory attentiveness that enables us to understand the nature of cause and effect within the production of material artifact. It allows us to absorb the delicacies of the methods used and the intricate details of their specific outcomes.
Every new physical manipulation of material, or thought about compositional elements is informed by a bank of previous insights which allows a kind of prediction as to what will happen, and sets up further questions as to the potentials for future possibilities.
By simply gaining more insight into the nature and manner of our pre-thought perception it gives greater clarity into how and what has been done and also to what may be done next within the creative process.
While my work is of course a direct embodiment of my own mental/physical processes, it is also devised as a metaphor for the inherent nature of the processes themselves.
Neither my work nor I will ever scream a definitive manifesto of our aims and intentions. I am not really attempting to tell you anything. I am simply materialising my view of the ‘nature of things’, which in turn is just giving you something to look at, and hopefully bringing you in closer.
Getting used to looking closely at small things, will always leads us to look even closer at larger things.
« 

 

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