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31/01/2011

Biennale Bijou SAUVAGE – Design Flanders Gallery (BE) – 3-31 Dec. 2010

The exhibition Bold Jewelry | the 7th Biennal Bijou Sauvage is all about the jewel without any restrictions or rules.

http://www.designvlaanderen.be/uploads/images/full/BijouSauvage131Small_1.jpg

The Biennale Bijou Sauvage is an initiative of the Wesel Art Gallery. It was first organised in May 1990 by jewelry designer Claude Wesel.
Sauvage: as occurring in nature, unrestrained, tempestuous, uncultivated, no longer under control (dictionary definition).
A number of designers were asked back then to design a piece of jewelry in which they could completely indulge themselves, against all the conventions and usual rules.
Avoid working the way you always do. Go in search of what you know least about yourself. Be an iconoclast and rid yourself of the academic straightjacket”.
The result was both a confrontation and a dialogue among the most divergent of inspirational sources and styles.
Bijou Sauvage stimulates the jewelry designer to create a piece of jewelry in his or her own, highly individual manner. The universal aspect leads many to rediscover their relationship with art, to reach, unrestricted, the deepest layers of their artistic ability.
“All risks are fair if they protect our soul from death” (Claude Wesel)

 

Biennale Bijou SAUVAGE - Design Flanders Gallery (BE) - 3-31 Dec. 2010 dans Belgique (BE) fl02
left: Daniel von Weinberger, image © GF  –  right: Nelly van Oost

 

Bold Jewelry: The designers
Siegfried De Buck – Daan De Decker – Alain Debono – Marie-Claire Desmedt – Saskia DeteringSilke Fleischer – Bernard François – Marie Paule Haar – Delphine Joly – Rembrandt Jordan – Maëlle Laduron – Mei Lee – Jorge Manilla – Patrick Marchal – Thomas Palme – Elke Peeters – Claude Renard – Alain Roggeman – Evelien Sipkes – Emile Souply – Doris Stein – Gwennaël Thérasse – Roos Van de Velde – Willy Van de VeldeHilde Van der HeydenNelly van Oost – Peter Vermandere – Tine Vindevogel – Daniel von WeinbergerJulien Walraedt – Marcel Warrand – Claude Wesel – Antoine Van Loocke

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Tine Vindevogel

 

Design Flanders Gallery,
Kanselarijstraat 19, B-1000 BRUSSELS
(near the Saint-Michael Cathedral)
tel: +32 (0)2 227.60.60 -
fax: +32 (0)2 227.60.69 -
info@designvlaanderen.be

COUP de … ROUGE avec Katie POTERALA

Classé dans : COUP DE COEUR,Katie POTERALA (US),USA — bijoucontemporain @ 0:08

« I am intrigued by the irony of and differences between perceived and intrinsic value.
My work is an attempt to exploit the boundary between valuable and invaluable, provide the viewer with a universally accessible place of departure, and to provoke a dialogue about values and perception.
Recognizable forms reference objects of understood or accepted value. Jewelry objects, although familiar, are altered to become introspective and uncommon. Modifications, mutations, and unexpected surfaces and appendages call into question our concept of the precious, the significance and value of bodily adornment, and the social values that drive both. Both the body and familial objects and environments act as hosts, providing a context that addresses the importance of place and image: specific concerns that motivate the values we possess. » (Katie POTERALA)

COUP de ... ROUGE  avec Katie POTERALA dans COUP DE COEUR
Katie POTERALA- Broken Enamel Necklace – Copper, Brass, Enamel, Faceted Stones

 dans Katie POTERALA (US)

 dans USA

30/01/2011

EXPO ‘Barbara Uderzo: Blob Rings’ – Macef Milano (Italy) – 27-30 Janv. 2011

Classé dans : Barbara UDERZO (IT),Exposition/Exhibition,Italie (IT),plastiques,rings,www Klimt02 — bijoucontemporain @ 18:11

Blob rings are made in silver and coloured plastics and incorporate symbolic micro-objects from contemporary life. Barbara works the magmatic and coloured plastics in an experimental way, recreating casual shapes around a silver ring. During the years Barbara Uderzo has created small “families” of Blob rings on specific themes, such as Blob rings food, with food material and kitchen tools; jewels with slices of cakes, small cups or teapots, small coffeepots or sweets, all dipped in cream or in a translucent glass. 
*The collection’s name comes from the title of a science fiction cult movie of the Fifties, “The Blob”, whose main character is a strawberry-like jelly which invades the Earth and swallows everything and everyone it finds on its way.

EXPO Barbara Uderzo Blob Rings

I Blob rings sono realizzati in plastica e inglobano micro-oggetti simbolici della contemporaneità. La plastica, magma e colore, è lavorata in modo sperimentale, rielaborando forme casuali attorno ad un cerchio in argento. Nel corso degli anni Barbara Uderzo ha creato piccole “famiglie” di anelli Blob su argomenti specifici, come ad esempio i Blob rings food, relativi al cibo ed agli oggetti di cucina, quelli con fette di torte, tazzine o teiere, caffettiere o bonbon, immersi nella panna o in traslucide glasse.
*Il titolo della collezione, viene da quel film degli anni ’50 divenuto un culto per gli amanti della fantascienza: “Blob, il fluido che uccide”; protagonista del film è infatti una gelatina color fragola che invade la Terra e inghiotte qualsiasi cosa o persona capiti sulla sua strada.

EXPO 'Barbara Uderzo: Blob Rings' - Macef Milano (Italy) - 27-30 Janv. 2011 dans Barbara UDERZO (IT) 02
Barbara Uderzo - ‘Blob rings’ – anelli – plastica, argento (rodiato), miniature

http://www.wearableartblog.com/.a/6a00e54fd5676f883401348895123f970c-800wi

 

 

Macef Milano
DESIGNER CLUB A21 B24, padiglione 11
fieraMilano/Rho – Milan
Italy
website: www.macef.it
Macef Milano is one of the largest trade events dedicated to home decor, jewellery & fashion accessories, gifts & antique market in Europe.

COUP de « blues » avec Yura BYLKOV

Classé dans : COUP DE COEUR,Russie (RU),Yurij BYLKOV (RU) — bijoucontemporain @ 0:15

Yura Bylkov (Saint Petersbourg, RU) – Issu de « Image and Form« , Ecole de design en bijouterie.

« I’m Yura Bylkov and I come from St.-Petersburg, Russia. I’m a jewellery designer. Art is my life. I get inspired from the world around me that is moving in a constant motion. I’m drawn into usual, everyday things that I later transform using different materials into colorful juxtapositions of form and light. » (Yura Bylkov)

see also on Russian Creators website

COUP de

60190_1431731683257_1531851129_31160396_5588524_n dans Russie (RU)
Yura Bylkov-ring – thin copper foil, plastic, acrylic, hot glue
« série d’anneaux sur le sujet: « pas de bijoux de luxe à partir de matériaux non traditionnels », grâce à quelques astuces, ces anneaux sont semblables à du caoutchouc et ont une grande variété de couleurs« 

34836_1528450301162_1531851129_31328210_2769778_n dans Yurij BYLKOV (RU)
Yura Bylkov-  ring

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Yura Bylkov- Collection « Ice » - Broche - argent allemand (2006 à 2009 )

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Yura Bylkov- brooch metal plastic (recycle – plastic bottles)

 

photo
Yura Bylkov-ring- metal, paper, acrylic – 2009

 

29/01/2011

Origin 2011 – Appel à candidatures – deadline : 8 mars

Classé dans : Appel a candidature / Call for Entry,Grande-Bretagne (UK),Salon — bijoucontemporain @ 19:37

Frieda Munro

Origin sera de retour à l’Old Spitalfields Market. Cet événe­ment, réunis­sant plus de 200 créa­teurs dans toutes les dis­ci­plines, dési­reux de vendre leur tra­vail aux prin­ci­paux ache­teurs et se faire connaître auprès des médias inter­na­tio­naux, se tien­dra du 22 au 28 sep­tembre 2011 durant le London Design Festival.

Les for­mu­laires de can­di­da­tures sont désor­mais dis­po­nibles en ligne sur le site d’Origin : http://originuk.org/ 

Date limite 8 Mars

 

 

The Application Process is now LIVE
Deadline – 8 March 2011

Origin is evolving!
In 2010, the Crafts Council re-launched Origin at the London Design Festival, giving makers access to interior designers, retailers and architects alongside the many visitors that Origin already attracts.
209 makers made sales totalling over £700,000 to 17,000 visitors in 7 days, established new contacts, pursued new commissioning opportunities and were seen by 600 international media.
In September 2011, we will be returning to the London Design Festival, again bringing together makers in all disciplines, working at all scales, with key buyers, commissioners, and media in a renewed Origin pavilion at Spitalfields Market.
We want to hear from established and new makers keen to sell to new markets, develop new clients and take advantage of the opportunities offered by Origin at the London Design Festival.
And we want to show this audience the best contemporary craft – from jewellery and fashion, ceramics and glass, textiles and tableware, to furniture and large-scale installations which offer extraordinary opportunities to commission new work.

Découverte : Joe CHURCHMAN neoprene jewelry

Classé dans : COUP DE COEUR,Joe CHURCHMAN (US),USA — bijoucontemporain @ 0:08

 

« My current projects revolve entirely around neoprene, though I also work with nonferrous metals.
One such project, I have recently come to call Permutations. Using what I began in my undergraduate program with the neoprene bracelets in my portfolio, my goal with this project is to see just how many different designs I can come up with. All bracelets will be based on the simple design repeated in my pictures, with variations counting only in the vein of ornamentation or manipulation. I intend to continue cutting and manipulating the work by hand, so minutiae of measurement/mismeasurement are excluded from differentiation. Eventually, I intend to add other materials, such as metal leaf, sheet or wire, to the neoprene as I am inspired to do.
Currently, I have a limited set of editions of the first Permutations for sale. The three varieties for sale can be seen in my photos below: the plain cuff, the perforated cuff and the one with scored lines. I will only be making a total of 24 of each of these three in the plain neoprene and when they’re gone, they’re gone » (Joe CHURCHMAN)

 

Découverte : Joe CHURCHMAN neoprene jewelry dans COUP DE COEUR
Joe Churchman - neoprene jewelry

 dans Joe CHURCHMAN (US)
Joe Churchman - neoprene jewelry

 dans USA
Joe Churchman - « Burden Cuff Alt »- Materials: Neoprene, 23K gold leaf- 

The idea behind this bracelet is that the wearer is so wealthy and affluent that not only could they afford to purchase it, but they don’t need the use of their hand to maintain such wealth.

28/01/2011

TOKYO : HIKO Mizuno College of Jewelry – Graduation Works Exhibition – Spiral Garden Aoyama, Tokyo (JP) 15-24 Fevr. 2011

HIKO Mizuno College of Jewelry Graduation Works Exhibition

Found in 1966, Hiko Mizuno College of Jewelry is the only one Jewelry school in Tokyo authorized by the school education law. Hiko Mizuno has taken a form of a non-profitable organization, which is officially authorized by the Tokyo Metropolitan Government under the Law of Education. This authorization has enabled the school to receive a permit from the Ministry of Health, Labor and Welfare to provide licensed careers advice and VISA (2-year) arrangement for the overseas students.
Hiko Mizuno not only enjoys constant international visitors in jewelry and art all year around, but also invites overseas jewelry artists every year to hold summer workshops and slide lectures. The school has established long-close ties with overseas universities by exchanging students and holding joint exhibitions. Such international events are held throughout the year at Hiko Mizuno. We have a partnership with 58 schools in 16 countries all over the world. Hiko Mizuno has more than 160 students who have come from abroad.
There are four departments, Jewelry, Watch, Shoes and Bags. Each department has several courses in the program of 2–4 years.

 

Jewelry Department
Jewelry Design Course (2 years)
Silver Accessory Course (2 years)
Fashion Coordinator Course (2 years)
High Jewelry Course (3 years)
Fashion Art Accessory Course (3 years)
Metal Craft Course (3 years)
Silver Accessory Master Course (3 years)
Advanced Jewelry Course (4 years, Advanced Diploma program)
Jewelry Institute Course (Advanced Diploma program)

http://www.polkadot.it/wp-content/uploads/2010/03/FLorian.jpg
Florian Ladstaetter (Wien/Vienna) jewelry

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Florian Ladstaetter   « Think Big » workshop

TOKYO : HIKO Mizuno College of Jewelry - Graduation Works Exhibition - Spiral Garden Aoyama, Tokyo (JP) 15-24 Fevr. 2011 dans Bernhard SCHOBINGER (CH) recent_04recent_05 dans ECOLE / SCHOOLS
Bernhard Schobinger « Making a Snake bangle » workshop

http://blog.yes.pl/wp-content/uploads/2010/11/20804.jpg
Koutarou Omizo  – ring – Gold threads, deer horn

 dans Exposition/Exhibition
 Kenta Katakura wood rings 

Maki KAWAWA- JP- Necklace-' Little by Little, with care' - cloth
Maki Kawawa – necklaces ‘Little by Little, with care’ – Cloth (discovered at JOYA 2010)

Katsura SASAKI- JP- Necklace- Fruits within flesh - silver, citrus, wire
Katsura Sasaki – necklace ‘Fruits within flesh’ -Pure silver, citrus, wire – Fruit and skin used to be one object.The relationship of inside and outside was created by separating the two.The removed skin crawls around on the adbomen looking for the fruits to be newly united.

Mari IWAMOTO- 'little sea monsters' ring
Mari Iwamoto – ‘Little sea monsters’ rings – plastic- 2008

 

HIKO Mizuno College of Jewelry Graduation Works Exhibition
Spiral Garden Aoyama
5-6-23 Minami-Aoyama, Minato-ku
107-0062 – Tokyo (Japan)
Tel : 81-3-3499-0300
website: hikohiko.jp/language/english
mail: international@jewelry.ac.jp

27/01/2011

Découverte : Ulrike Strempel – knitted jewelry

Ulrike Strempel: knitted silver and gold (DailyArtMuse)

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Ulrike Strempel – ring & earrings (primé au Legnica Festival)

« Germany’s Ulrike Strempel has created a collection of jewelry that is largely bold with angles and color and hard lines. However, there are several delicate, knitted silver and gold pieces that made me want to whisper. . .so softly« (DailyArtMuse)

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http://dailyartmuse.com/wp-content/uploads/2011/01/cyrano1.png

 

 

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26/01/2011

Découverte : Anita van DOORN

Classé dans : Anita van DOORN (AU),Australie (AU),Gal. Marzee (NL) — bijoucontemporain @ 0:08

Découverte grâce à la galerie Marzee et à l’exposition « Topos »  (Postgraduate Gold and Silversmithing students RMIT (Royal Melbourne Institute of Technology), Melbourne, AU) et grâce à ce collier « aquatique » :

Découverte : Anita van DOORN dans Anita van DOORN (AU) doorn,-av0801.tiff
Anita van Doorn - ‘For Urashima: Spring/Isolation’ necklace- perspex, opals, digital print, sterling silver, silk thread- 2008

mais je vais vous montrer d’elle un … « coup de rouge » comme j’aime les faire ! :-)

red_tree_neckpiece.jpg 
Anita van Doorn -« Red tree » necklace- silver, copper, enamel, ink, lacquer – 2007

red_tree_neckpiece_detail.jpg

red_tree_ring_closed.jpg

red_tree_ring_open.jpg
Anita van Doorn -« red tree » ring (open) – silver, copper, enamel, ink, lacquer, acrylic paint – 2007

 

« PERSONAL AND UNIVERSAL, SUBCONSCIOUS AND SUBMERGED, MY WORK IS AN EXTENSION OF MY INTIMATE SPACE OF BODILY EXPERIENCE, MEMORY AND EMOTION, ARTICULATED THROUGH UNDERWATER AND SUBCONSCIOUS LANDSCAPES WHERE ONE EXPERIENCES AND IS MINUTELY AND WHOLLY PART OF THEIR SHIFT AND FLOW.
I LIKE TO TAKE A SMALL, UNSEEABLE OR TAKEN FOR GRANTED ASPECT OF NATURE OR HUMANITY AND TURN IT INTO SOMETHING NEW AND PERSONAL, IN ORDER TO BRING THE VIEWERS ATTENTION TO THESE PHENOMENA. I BELIEVE AND HOPE THAT THIS CREATES A NEW UNDERSTANDING OF THE NATURE OF THE ORIGINAL OBJECT OR SUBJECT OF REFERENCE. SOMETIMES IT CAN BE LIKE SEEING SOMETHING FOR THE FIRST TIME.
THE THEME OF WATER FLOWS LIKE AN UNDERCURRENT THROUGH MOST OF MY WORK, WHILE EACH OBJECT I MAKE MAY TELL A DIFFERENT STORY. DRAWING REFERENCES FROM MYTHICAL STORIES OF JAPANESE FISHERMAN AND GUARDIANS OF THE OCEAN AND THE EXPLORERS WHO SAILED TO THE EDGE OF THE EARTH ONLY TO DISCOVER IT WAS ROUND, TO THE PHYSICS AND DYNAMICS OF CURRENTS AND WAVES, WHAT I TRY TO EXPRESS IS THE INDESCRIBABLE FEELING OF BEING, THROUGH BODILY EXPERIENCE, MEMORY AND EMOTION.
I THINK BECAUSE I USED TO DREAM ABOUT BEING ABLE TO BREATHE UNDERWATER THERE IS ALWAYS A POWERFUL AND DEEP EMOTIONAL INVOLVEMENT IN EACH PIECE I MAKE. THESE DREAMS WERE LIKE A REASSURANCE OF PERSONAL STRENGTH AND ABILITY TO COPE WITH THE THINGS THAT THREATEN TO DRAG ONE UNDER. THE OCEAN SWELLS, RISING AND FALLING LIKE IT IS BREATHING. EMOTION SWELLS, AND SOMETIMES WE FEEL AS THOUGH WE DROWN IN GRIEF, OR BUBBLE OVER WITH HAPPINESS. THESE METAPHORICAL ASSOCIATIONS ARE NOT ACCIDENTAL IN MY WORK.
WITH EMOTION AND EXPERIENCE AS THE FOUNDATIONS, I HOPE THAT I PROVOKE POSITIVE RESPONSES FROM WITHIN THE VIEWER, READER AND COLLECTOR, EVEN IF ONLY IN SOME SMALL WAY. I OFFER THIS AS AN ALTERNATIVE TO THE BLUNT, ONE-SIDED STATEMENTS AND ULTIMATUMS THAT ART AND ARTISTS ARE OFTEN NOTORIOUS FOR BECAUSE I BELIEVE THAT CHANGE COMES FROM WITHIN.
FOR ME JEWELLERY IS A WAY TO CREATE PERSONAL NARRATIVES THAT SAY SOMETHING ABOUT THE NATURE AND PERSONALITY OF BOTH MAKER AND WEARER. IT IS A TWO-WAY PERSONAL EXCHANGE THROUGH WHICH I HOPE TO FACILITATE A RETHINKING OF WAYS OF LIVING AND INTERACTING WITH EACH OTHER AND OUR SURROUNDINGS.
MY MOST RECENT BODY OF WORK IS CONCEPTUALLY LOCATED WITHIN THE ESTONIAN WORD ÄÄREMAA, AND IF IT WERE TO BE TRANSLATED INTO ENGLISH, WOULD RELATE TO ‘PERIPHERY’, ALTHOUGH NOT MERELY IN A GEOGRAPHICAL SENSE: THE ESTONIAN WORD ÄÄREMAA EXTENDS BEYOND THIS TO ENCOMPASS THE METAPHYSICAL, THE EMOTIONAL, THE UNTOUCHABLE, A LOCATION THAT EXISTS IN LANGUAGE, IS CREATED BY LANGUAGE. » (Anita van Doorn)

 

25/01/2011

Innovation in ENAMEL jewelry – Research project by Jessica Turrell

The Innovation in Enamel Jewellery database is one of the outcomes of the Arts and Humanities Research Council (AHRC)  funded three-year fellowship Innovation in Vitreous Enamel Surfaces for Jewellery.

As part of the research project extensive research was undertaken to identify a group of internationally prominent contemporary jewellers whose practice demonstrates an open and innovative approach to the use of enamel. When complete the database will feature images and supporting information on the work of approximately 30 artists. The aim of the database is to highlight the potential of enamel as an expressive and contemporary medium as well as serving as an important research tool.

The database, which is fully searchable, focuses exclusively on enamel jewellery and complements the existing archive ICVEA (International Contemporary Vitreous Enamel Archive) that is also hosted by the University of the West of England and which includes a broad range of contemporary enamel work.

Currently the database features the work of the following artists:
Carola Bauer – Germany
Jamie Bennett – USA
Stacey Bentley – UK
Patrizia Bonati – Italy
Stephen Bottomley – UK
Jessica Calderwood – USA
Lydia Feast – UK
Mirjam Hiller – Germany
Ike Junger – Germany
Kaori Juzu – Denmark
Ann Little – UK
Lianna Pattihis – UK
Jacqueline Ryan – Italy
Isabell Schaupp – Germany
Vera Siemund – The Netherlands
Marjorie Simon – USA
Elizabeth Turrell – UK
Jessica Turrell – UK
Annamaria Zanella – Italy
The following artist will be added in early autumn 2010:
Jennaca Davies – USA
Carolina Gimeno – Spain
Christine Graf – Germany
Sangeun Kim – UK
Natalia Pinchuck – USA
Barbara Seidenath – USA

Electroformed and enamelled pendants
 Jessica Turrell

 

 

 Innovation in Vitreous Enamel Surfaces in Jewellery

(UWE – University of the West England – Bristol – AHRC (Arts and Humanities Research Council) Vitreous Enamel Research Project)

Awarding body: Arts and Humanities Research Council
Awarded to: Jessica Turrell
Project duration: 1.09.2007 – 31.08.2010

introduction:
The research project is based on the premise that there is huge and largely unexplored potential for innovation within the field of enamelled jewellery. By taking both a practice-led and theoretical approach the aim of the project has been to identify factors that might hinder innovation and present a series of alternative approaches that encourage a more experimental and open-minded approach to enamel.

Research Context
The practical aspects of the research project were underpinned by theoretical and contextual research into the place of enamel in contemporary jewellery practice. This included a wide-ranging visual and literature survey. Web-based research combined with a series of visits to individual practitioners in the USA and Europe as well as to significant exhibitions and collections in Europe, the UK and USA, provided a broad overview of current enamel jewellery practice. This contextual research led to the identification of a number of contemporary jewellers for whom enamel forms a significant part of their practice. A methodology was developed by which the output of these jewellers was analyzed and then allocated to one of three distinct categories. These were as follows:

Skilled (fine) – broadly work that concentrates on traditional enamelling techniques to create work for a mainstream or commercial market.

New – where the work itself engages with contemporary ideas but where enamel is used simply to add a paint-like layer of colour to the surface of the piece using only basic techniques.

Innovative – where the two practices overlap and the artist is able to demonstrate both a k

A selected group of individuals, identified through this process as falling into the Innovative category, were then invited to submit images and supporting written material to the new Innovation in Vitreous Enamel Surfaces in Jewellery database that operates alongside (and is complimentary to) the existing International Contemporary Vitreous Enamel Archive (ICVEA) currently held by the Enamel Research Unit at the University of the West of England, Bristol.

Link to Innovation in Enamel Jewellery database

The contextual and theoretical aspects of the project are examined in depth in an article for Craft Research entitled Surface and Substance – a call for the fusion of skill and ideas in contemporary enamel jewellery.
The article is available online at the following site: craft research journal online

Discussion Forum
A variety of approaches have been taken in order to stimulate debate and comment regarding the place of enamel in contemporary jewellery practice. The first of these was a discussion forum entitled ‘Innovation in Enamel’ which has involved a number of internationally prominent enamel artists all of whom demonstrate a non-traditional approach to their enamel practice. The central aim of this forum has been to highlight the potential of enamel as an innovative medium and to stimulate debate about the aesthetic, conceptual and practical considerations that govern the use of enamel in contemporary jewellery practice. The forum has operated as a members’ only project, meaning that the site can only be accessed by registered members and they alone are able to view the content and submit comment. The rational for this was to encourage those involved to freely discuss their ideas without the constraints of operating within a public arena.

Selected extracts and a summary of the discussions threads can be accessed here.

In addition to the forum site, Jessica has initiated a discussion strand -‘Surface and substance: the place of enamel in contemporary jewellery practice’, which appears on the International Art Jewellery Online Community, Klimt02 – www.klimt02.net/blogs

These two discussion strands have informed the written and theoretical aspects of the research and the production of a number of case studies.
Case Studies
The case studies feature artists who were chosen as representative of a broad and diverse range of approaches to enamel :

Innovation in ENAMEL jewelry - Research project by Jessica Turrell dans Annamaria ZANELLA (IT) bottomley_large
Stephen Bottomley, Yellow Drape Neckpiece, Laser-cut steel and enamel -(Photo: John K. McGregor)

pattihis_large dans Barbara SEIDENATH (DE)
Liana Pattihis, Coral Red Snake Chain Brooch 2009

isabell_schaupp dans Carola BAUER (DE)
Isabell Schaupp, Brooch, Enamel, copper, silver, 2009

christine_graf dans Carolina GIMENO (Chili)
Christine Graf, 2010

In order to 

promote innovative enamel jewellery to the widest possible audience Jessica is currently curating a significant international exhibition that will feature a group of jewellers identified for their innovative use of enamel. The show will begin its tour at Contemporary Applied Arts in London in late 2011, and will then travel to a number of venues across the UK including to the Ruthin Craft Centre in Wales.


Practical and Technical Research

The focus of the practical element of the research has been an investigation into the use of innovative and experimental enamelling techniques in the production of contemporary jewellery. Methods and approaches more usually associated with large-scale and panel enamelling and industrial processes have been adapted for use in wearable pieces. This investigation is supported by the development of a range of techniques that allow for the creation of three-dimensional forms that can be successfully enamelled.
The practical and technical aspects of the research fall into two main categories, these are the production of three-dimensional forms capable of being enamelled in the round and the development of enamelling techniques suitable for application to these three-dimensional forms.

Three-dimensional form trials

Initial research involved investigations into the use of three-dimensional forms created using traditional forming, construction and joining methods. The most commonly used joining technique is the use of high melting-point (or hard) silver solders. The received wisdom is that it is not possible to enamel directly over a soldered joint as the solder will discolour the overlying enamel and can in some cases cause it to come away from the soldered joint. In order to test this theory, extensive investigations were undertaken into the use of a group of silver alloy solders, which were tested for their stability and the effect that they had on the subsequent layer of fired enamel.

Although some solders gave better results than others they all visibly interfered with the enamel they were directly in contact with in some way.

As an alternative to the use of solders, fusion and laser welding were investigated. Both these methods use high levels of accurately directed heat to achieve a fused joint that does not require any additional solder. Although, to differing degrees, both of these techniques created a satisfactory join over which enamel could successfully be applied without too many problems the equipment required was not easily accessible, required outside assistance and was expensive to trial. For these reasons this avenue of research was not pursued.
It seemed that a seam free object should prove the ideal form over which to apply the enamel. There are a number of small-scale silver and copper-smithing techniques that can be employed to raise a seam-free hollow form from a flat sheet of meta,l but such methods are technically demanding and particularly difficult on a small scale. Thus this avenue of research was also rejected. Instead, the technique of electroforming seemed to offer a versatile and accessible method for the creation of 3D forms, and it became clear that a detailed investigation of the technique would prove to be the most productive strand of research.

To this end bespoke electroforming equipment was researched, designed, and built, and a series of tests undertaken. Research and trials were carried out to establish the most suitable materials and methods of production of base forms upon which metal might be deposited during the electroforming process.

Discussions took place with colleagues from the 3D Research Laboratory within the CFPR into the possibilities of creating mandrels using rapid prototyping techniques, and the indicative trials that were carried out to ascertain the suitability of the RP process to create electroforming mandrels and the potential for the medium with which the object is printed both to withstand the process and be easily removed as a core prior to enamelling. As a direction for further research these initial trials hold a lot of promise.
This collaborative strand of research was documented in a poster presentation given during the IMPACT 7 conference in 2009.

In order for the electroforming process to occur it is necessary that the surface of the object to be electroformed is able to conduct an electrical current. As a number of non-conductive materials had been identified as appropriate to this research it was therefore necessary to undertake a further series of trails to establish the most suitable electro-conductive coatings for the purposes of the project.

The final experiments in the production of the underlying electroforms was to trial all the variable of the electroforming process itself to establish the best method for the creation of a smooth and stable form of an appropriate surface and structure that would withstand the application of enamel.

Enamelling trials
In order to develop methods for the application of enamel to the three-dimensional forms resulting from the first strand of investigation, a comprehensive series of tests for the application and adhesion of jewellery and industrial enamel to two and 3D surfaces was undertaken. Stilting and firing methods for 3D objects enamelled in the round were also investigated. Methodology for the recording of technical tests has been developed and trialed and a standardized format has been developed, informed by these trials, which has been used to record the results of all tests undertaken.

Practical Outcomes
On completion of the practical trials a group of jewellery pieces were created using the methods established as most appropriate in the realization of a defined personal aesthetic. These pieces were exhibited at Contemporary Applied Art in London during June and July 2010.

finished2 dans Christine GRAF (DE)
Jessica Turrell- Electroformed and enamelled pendants

fiinished1 dans Elizabeth TURRELL (UK)
Jessica Turrell- Electroformed and enamelled pendants

 

Dissemination
The practical and theoretical outcomes of the project were disseminated by a number of methods throughout the period of the research.

symposium:
A symposium was held at the Bower Ashton Campus, University of the West of England in July 2010:
Read a review of the symposium here – http://www.iom3.org/news/enamoured-enamel

SUMMARY:
Addressing an audience composed of professional makers, academics, researchers and students the symposium examined the place of enamel within contemporary jewellery practice, celebrating its potential as an exciting and innovative material. At a time when increasing numbers of contemporary jewellers are rediscovering enamel this event offered a timely opportunity for the sharing of information and ideas plus a chance to network and take part in debate.

 

Conclusion
The ultimate aim of the project has been to demonstrate the potential of enamel as an exciting and innovative material and to thus affect a change in the commonly held perception that enamel is a medium not readily associated with contemporary jewellery practice. It is anticipated that the dissemination of the outcomes of the research project Innovation in Vitreous Enamel Surface for Jewellery will go some way towards the creation of an environment where the innovative potential of the material is more widely recognized, both by the jewellery community and within art education, thus allowing a more ambitious and rigorous enamel practice to flourish.

 

Visit the CAA exhibition page at http://www.caa.org.uk/exhibitions/archive

JessicaTurrell dans email / enamel
Jessica Turrell

« The intimate scale of jewellery is a central factor in my practice. I strive to create work that has a tactile delicacy and that rewards the wearers close attention with an intricate and detailed surface. Over recent years I have developed an experimental approach to enamel by which I seek to create work that moves away from traditional jewellery enamel practice in order to achieve a more ambiguous and expressive surface quality. » (Jessica Turrell)

Exhibitions 2010 – Showcasing a New Collection of Enamel Jewellery 18 June – 17 July 2010, London

All images from The Enamel Experience at Velvet da Vinci Gallery,

 

Elizabeth Turrell – cross Badges (exhibition « The Enamel Experience », Velvet da Vinci Gallery, 2008)

 

Image de prévisualisation YouTube

 

Image de prévisualisation YouTube

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