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06/06/2012

EXPO ‘UNEXPECTED PLEASURES’ – NGV International, Melbourne (AU) – 20 Avril-26 Aout 2012

UNEXPECTED PLEASURES

The Art and Design of Contemporary Jewellery

A Design Museum, London touring exhibition
at NGV (National Gallery of Victoria)

unexpected-pleasures-0.jpg

Unexpected Pleasures looks at what we mean by jewellery from a number of different perspectives.  Taking as its starting point the radical experiments of the Contemporary Jewellery Movement that challenged a conventional understanding of the language of personal adornment, and looking instead at the essential meanings of jewellery, the exhibition brings together important work from around the world, and looks at it from the point of view of the wearer as well as the maker. Contemporary  Jewellery in this sense is at the intersection of art and design.

Curated by Dr. Susan Cohn for the Design Museum, London with exhibition design by Ab Rogers Design and graphics by Barnbrook.

« UNEXPECTED Pleasures, an exhibition of the world’s ugliest, loveliest, most intriguing contemporary jewellery, opened at the National Gallery of Victoria International yesterday.
 »Everything here is designed to be worn, » said guest curator and jewellery designer Susan Cohn.
Visitors took that as a challenge, moving through 180 dimly lit curiosities by the world’s most radical designers, trying to imagine what it would be like to wear a necklace of glass and ceramic dildos. Or a tubular  »veil » collar like a pearly plastic version of Ned Kelly’s helmet. Or a cluster of rusted bolts and nails on a silver  »Screw Ring ».
 »After procreation and survival, our next instinct as humans is adornment, » Cohn said when asked,  »Why? »
 »Adornment is about attracting a mate, which in turn, is about procreation and survival. »
Some humans, however, obviously require more complex, intellectual adornments than others.  »Yes, some wearers will want something that speaks that way for them, » Cohn said. Among the exhibits was a vast choice of such expression, from the minimalist exquisitry of a grey sunray-pleated yoke, to a clump of small pale  »tumours », photographed bursting through a model’s frock. The latter was in a category of radical ideas.
NGV director Gerard Vaughan said the exhibition offered  »a fresh view of the many meanings associated with jewellery ».
The visiting director of London’s Design Museum, Deyan Sudjic, said it was the result of a  »long, drawn-out, cerebral process », and that is precisely how it felt.
Unexpected Pleasures: The Art and Design of Contemporary Jewellery, is a Design Museum, London, exhibition funded by the Joan and Peter Clemenger Trust.
It is free and runs until August 26, when it will travel to London. (Daily Life.com.au)

Art and design come together through its exploration of the radical experiments of contemporary jewelers who have pushed the boundaries. Navigate your way through the labyrinth of themes; Worn Out (celebrating the experience of wearing jewellery), Linking Links (looks at the way in which narratives are expressed through sub-themes and creative systems) and A Fine Line (offers insight into the origins of contemporary jewellery today) in an exhibition that is not to be missed.

MEGA,  2009
Camilla Prasch – MEGA 2009 – red dyed snap fasteners, nylon thread, silicone discs – Photo: Dorte Krogh

EXPO 'UNEXPECTED PLEASURES' - NGV International, Melbourne (AU) - 20 Avril-26 Aout 2012 dans Australie (AU) EXHI016680Sally Marsland (AU) – Flat colour, brooches (2002) – epoxy resin mixed with powdered pigment - Photo: Jeremy Dillon

Doug Bucci, USA, Trans-Hematopoietic neckpiece (2010).Doug Bucci, USA, Trans-Hematopoietic neckpiece (2010).

Susie Ganch, USA, Yellow dust, brooch (2010).Susie Ganch, USA, Yellow dust, brooch (2010)

Unexpected pleasures exhibition.David Bielander, Scampi, armband/bracelet, 2007

Unexpected pleasures exhibition.Karl Fritsch Screw ring 2010 silver, nails, screws

 

Karl Fritsch, New Zealand, Steinhaufen, ring 2004.Karl Fritsch, New Zealand, Steinhaufen, ring 2004

Unexpected pleasures exhibition.Hyewon Kim -  Torn 1 (2011) – resin, twigs Photo: Myoungwook Huh

Unexpected Pleasures exhibition
Tiffany Parbs – Extension (2008) – hand woven hair, digital print – photo Terence Bogue
Caroline Broadhead, England, Veil, necklace (1983).
Caroline Broadhead, England, Veil, necklace (1983).
Susanne Klemm, « Frozen » necklace, plastic

Blanche Tilden  Speed, neckpiece  2000  borosilicate glass, titanium, anodised aluminium  1.2 x 24.0 cm  Collection of the artistBlanche TILDEN – Speed, neckpiece  2000  borosilicate glass, titanium, anodised aluminium

Paul Derrez  Pleated Collar  1982  Plastic, steel  Collection of Paul DerrezPaul Derrez  Pleated Collar  1982  Plastic, steel 

Felieke van der Leest - necklace Felieke van der Leest – necklace

Rose by Gijs Bakker: Colour photograph in laminated plastic (1983)    http://egetal.com.au/static/files/assets/7ab4f2ba/Image_1_news.jpgRose necklace by Gijs Bakker: Colour photograph in laminated plastic (1983) 

Dorothea Prühl - Habicht (Hawk), 2006 necklace, elm wood - H 40 cm Dorothea Prühl Habicht (Hawk), 2006 necklace, elm wood – H 40 cm

Noon Passama, Brooch, 2010Noon Passama, Brooch, 2010

 

First on show at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 20 April – 26 August 2012, this exhibition will also tour to the Design Museum in London, 5 Dec 2012 – 3 Mar 2013. Melbourne based designer and maker Dr. Susan Cohn (interview with The Age) has curated this exhibition for the Design Museum and is also co-author of the substantial catalogue documenting this event as well contributing to the discussion about contemporary design and making.

 

 

VIDEO

 

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