BIJOU_CONTEMPORAIN

Bienvenue sur mon blog

  • Accueil
  • > Archives pour le Samedi 1 novembre 2014

01/11/2014

EXPO ‘YOUTH MOVEMENT!’ – Kath Libbert Jewellery Gallery (UK) – 13 Nov. 2014 – 25 janv. 2015

YOUTH MOVEMENT ! NINE NEW GRADUATES -

Meet the Contemporary Jewellery World’s Next Generation!

THURSDAY 13TH NOV 6PM – 9PM

MANY OF THE GRADUATES WILL BE PRESENT AND DELIGHTED TO TALK TO YOU ABOUT THEIR WORK.
15% OFF ALL PURCHASES MADE ON THE NIGHT! -
FOR A FULL YOUTH MOVEMENT! CATALOGUE PLEASE SEE : www.kathlibbertjewellery.co.uk

 YOUTH MOVEMENT! NINE NEW GRADUATES -  ( bangle by Natalie Lee, a graduate from Birmingham School of Jewellery.)( bangle by Natalie Lee, a graduate from Birmingham School of Jewellery.)

Meet the Contemporary Jewellery World’s Next Generation:
Beth Spowart, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee; Jaki Coffey, National College of Art and Design, Dublin; Karen Elizabeth Donovan, Edinburgh College of Art; Rebecca E Smith, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee; Natalie Lee, Birmingham School of Jewellery; Prudence Horrocks, Edinburgh College of Art; Lindsay Hill, Glasgow School of Art; Georgia Rose West, Colchester School of Art and Design, University of Essex; Rosie Deegan, Nottingham Trent University.

 ‘Overgrown’ – neckpiece in titanium, niobium and precious white metal by Karen Elizabeth Donovan, Edinburgh College of Art.Karen Elizabeth Donovan – ‘Overgrown’ – neckpiece in titanium, niobium & precious white metal - Edinburgh College of Art.

 Karen Elizabeth Donovan, Edinburgh College of Art; ‘Highland Clan Badges: Murray’ in titanium and steel, modelled - Kath Libbert Jewellery Gallery -YOUTH MOVEMENT!Karen Elizabeth Donovan, Edinburgh College of Art; ‘Highland Clan Badges: Murray’ in titanium and steel, modelled ‘Flawless’ – ring in oxidised silver with kinetic cubic zirconia by Lindsay Hill, Glasgow School of Art.Lindsay Hill – ‘Flawless’ – ring in oxidised silver with kinetic cubic zirconia – Glasgow School of Art.

 Lindsay Hill, Glasgow School of Art - ‘Three Stone’ – brooch in oxidised silver with kinetic cubic zirconiaLindsay Hill, Glasgow School of Art – ‘Three Stone’ – brooch in oxidised silver with kinetic cubic zirconia‘Lust in Found - Skip’ forced perspective skip brooch - powder coated steel and copper, magnets and found objects by Jaki Coffey, National College of Art and Design, Dublin. Jaki Coffey – ‘Lust in Found – Skip’ forced perspective skip brooch – powder coated steel and copper, magnets & found objects – National College of Art and Design, Dublin.

Jaki Coffey, National College of Art and Design, Dublin - ‘Lust in Found - Skips’ - 9 flat, forced perspective Skip Brooches - powder coated copper, magnetic backs and magnetic found object 'rubbish'Jaki Coffey, National College of Art and Design, Dublin – ‘Lust in Found – Skips’ – 9 flat, forced perspective Skip Brooches – powder coated copper, magnetic backs and magnetic found object ‘rubbish

Jaki Coffey, National College of Art and Design, Dublin - ‘Lust in Found - Pip, Pippet & Bob neckpieces with option of attaching skip brooch via hidden magnet : gold plated copper, found objects, magnets Jaki Coffey, National College of Art and Design, Dublin – ‘Lust in Found – Pip, Pippet & Bob neckpieces with option of attaching skip brooch via hidden magnet : gold plated copper, found objects, magnets

Kath Libbert Jewellery Gallery is delighted to introduce Nine New Graduates buzzing on our radar this year.
Technology meets art meets jewellery in this amazing collection that includes Smart Materials colour changing jewellery; Fill Your Own bright yellow Skip Brooches; kinetic gemstone rings; tough titanium Highland Clan Thistle Brooches; Wired Wearables – dramatic neckpieces and bangles drawn in steel – just a few of the visual treats created by this year’s New Wave!
Based at Salts Mill since 1996, Kath Libbert Jewellery Gallery is renowned for its annual pick of the crop of new talents from across the UK’s universities. Curator Kath Libbert who selected the nine artists says ‘I always look for individuality and a fresh approach and the work of this year’s graduates is sure to surprise and stimulate!’
Moving Onwards and Upwards:
Beth Spowart, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee – 1st Class Honours, uses Smart Materials to create innovative jewellery which interacts uniquely with each individual wearer by changing colours through the stimulus of their body heat – an exciting experience for the wearer and definitely a conversation opener!
Jaki Coffey, National College of Art and Design, Dublin – 1st Class Honours, loves searching out treasure in skips and uses this as her inspiration for a series of funky bright yellow impeccably made powder coated copper Skip Brooches – the wearer then chooses what to fill up their Skip with from a selection of colourful ‘rubbish’ – becoming the curator of their own jewellery and making a provocative poke at our notions of preciousness!
Rebecca E Smith, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee – 1st Class Honours, discovered 300 wonderful love letters sent between her grandparents during World War ll and wanted as a testament to both this love story and to the power of letter writing, now a lost art, to create sentimental one off brooches, earrings and necklaces capturing the original handwriting, old photographs and vintage colours in a subtle palette of enamels. On an interactive note, Rebecca invites visitors to this exhibition to let her create jewellery capturing their own personal artefacts.
Lindsay Hill, Glasgow School of Art, BA Honours, employs advanced digital technologies to set stones kinetically in her striking rings whose bold symmetrical lines are also inspired by the facets on the gemstones they house. Both supremely elegant and great fun – the glinting gem tilts backwards and forwards as you move!
Natalie Lee, Birmingham School of Jewellery, 1st Class Honours, crafts Wired Wearables a collection of dramatic arm and neckpieces. An extension of her drawings, the fluid lines in steel are skilfully manipulated using a PUK welder and then enamelled in deep greys with highlights of powder blue and mauve. The continuous play of light and shadow the pieces cast when worn “symbolise the transit of time, a progression representing both the past and the future.” she says.
Karen Elizabeth Donovan, Edinburgh College of Art, MA Distinction, masterfully moves that hardest of metals titanium to create exquisite filigree-like necklaces bracelets and Highland Clan brooches gently tinted in blues, greens and golds. Scotland’s rich social history, its flora, and the materiality of titanium are her inspiration: “Plants define the character of a Nation or place. In Vermont, where I was born, we define ourselves by the Maple Tree. In Scotland we are often defined by the Thistle…..Titanium has a certain feel to it; a noise it makes when I brush my hand across it, and a smell it creates when I pierce, file and sand it. It is lightweight, strong, durable, and springy. It presents challenges to overcome and work around. It is sensual and it is home.”
Prudence Horrocks, Edinburgh College of Art, MA, inspired by the drawn line and a desire to replicate the patterns that are possible in pen and ink into jewellery, has crafted a beautiful series of rings, brooches and necklaces. In a classic palette of matt white and black acrylic she has embedded fine lines of silver and gold, creating a sophisticated elegant and supremely wearable collection.
Georgia Rose West, Colchester School of Art and Design, University of Essex, BA Honours – creates delightful small copper bowls, forming the metal into fluid shapes embellished with a great variety of creamy enamel patterning, each one having its own personality.
Rosie Deegan, Nottingham Trent University, 1st Class Honours – a mixed media, glass and metalwork artist, presents a quirky humorous body of work For a Man of Substance. The ironic title refers to her collection of Impotent Tools – made from glass and precious metals, they are exquisitely handcrafted but practically pointless!

Natalie Lee, Birmingham School of Jewellery - ‘Wired Wearables’ – neckpiece in steel and enamel, modelledNatalie Lee, Birmingham School of Jewellery – ‘Wired Wearables’ – neckpiece in steel and enamel, modelled

Natalie Lee, ‘Wired Wearables’ – neckpiece in steel and enamel, modelled  Natalie Lee, ‘Wired Wearables’ – neckpiece in steel and enamel, modelled

Large Oval Brooch in oxidised silver and 9ct rose gold set into acrylic by Prudence Horrocks, Edinburgh College of Art.Prudence Horrocks – Large Oval Brooch in oxidised silver and 9ct rose gold set into acrylic – Edinburgh College of Art.

 Prudence Horrocks, Edinburgh College of Art; - Necklace in silver and 9ct gold set into acrylicPrudence Horrocks, Edinburgh College of Art; – Necklace in silver and 9ct gold set into acrylic‘Darling Margaret’ – earrings in enamelled copper with handwriting and tassels by Rebecca E Smith, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee.Rebecca E Smith – ‘Darling Margaret’ – earrings in enamelled copper with handwriting and tassels – Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee.

Rebecca E Smith, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee - ‘Swindon’ – brooch in enamelled copper with handwritingRebecca E Smith, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee – ‘Swindon’ – brooch in enamelled copper with handwriting

'Orange’ - earrings in Thermochromic Resin, dyed aluminium, brass and silver - Beth Spowart, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee;Beth Spowart – ‘Orange’ – earrings in Thermochromic Resin, dyed aluminium, brass and silver – -  Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee

 

 

KATH LIBBERT JEWELLERY GALLERY
Salts Mill, Saltaire,
Bradford BD18 3LA. – UK
Tel/Fax 01274 599790.
info@kathlibbertjewellery.c…
www.kathlibbertjewellery.co.uk

OPEN DAILY 10 – 5.30 MON – FRI and 10 – 6 AT WEEKENDS

 

 

EXPO ‘la mort vous va si bien’ – Janus Gallery, Montreux (CH) – 1er Nov. 2014 – 15 janv. 2015

Janus Gallery - « la mort vous va si bien » 

 EXPO - Janus Gallery - Montreux (CH) 'la mort vous va si bien'

Mort et Bijou, deux compères qui marchent main dans la main depuis la nuit des temps. Memento mori, vanités, bijoux de deuil, bijoux funéraires de toute sorte et plus récemment crânes os et squelettes avec ou sans intention particulière derrière, ont toujours peuplé le monde de la parure.
Janus Gallery s’est demandé comment les bijoutiers contemporains interpréteraient ce thème, et plus particulièrement comment ils approcheraient l’idée séduisante et dérangeante de « la mort vous va si bien ».
Pour le découvrir, Janus Gallery a invité plus de 120 bijoutiers contemporains du monde entier à participer à un concours-exposition sur le thème « la mort vous va si bien »

Janus Gallery - "la mort vous va si bien" JANUS GALLERY Avenue Claude Nobs 2 CH - 1820 Montreux   +41 (0)21 963 18 84 www.janusgallery.ch

 21 artistes ont été au final retenus pour faire partie de cette exposition, et cette lourde tâche que de les choisir a été dévolue a un jury d’exception.Composé de 7 membres, et présidé par Mme Carole Guinard. Il se compose par ordre alphabétique de:
Mme Elizabeth Fischer, responsable Design Bijou et Accessoires, HEAD – Genève
• Mme Thérèsa Flury fondatrice du Club des Pies, un club dédié aux amateurs de bijoux,
• Mme Florence Grivel, historienne de l’art,
• Mme Carole Guinard, bijoutière contemporaine, scénographe au mudac, chargée de la collection de la confédération(collection de bijoux de la confédération helvétique), présidente du jury La Mort vous va si bien,
• M Vincent Lieber, conservateur du Musée Hstorique et des Porcelaines de Nyon,
• M Denis Pernet, curateur indépendant, directeur de La Nuit des Musées (Lausanne) et
• Mme Ilinca Vlad, galeriste chez Janus Gallery.
Nous nous réjouissons de vous faire découvrir cet univers étrange et fascinant dès le 1er novembre 2014.

artistes participants :   Sylvie GodelKatheryn Leopoldseder Sophie BoudubanMonica Wickström –  Aurélie Dellasanta  — Kiko GianoccaJessica Andersen –  Cathy ChotardEero LintusaariTiffany Rowe – Nils Schmalenbach  — Constanze Schreiber – Ambroise DegenèveFlorie DupontTuija HietanenSarrah KacemAude MedoriLucile BurnierMarianne AnselinDiana Dudek –  Emeline Fichot

  Katherine Leopoldseder - Fearfully and Wonderfully Made (Psalm 139) Lung Necklace, 2010 Cigarette filters, oxidized copper, Sterling silver, fresh water pearls, silk -Katherine Leopoldseder – Fearfully and Wonderfully Made (Psalm 139) Lung Necklace, 2010 Cigarette filters, oxidized copper, Sterling silver, fresh water pearls, silk 

  Tiffany Rowe - OFF WITH HER HEAD!  necklace  Vinyl, acrylic, ribbon.  For this statement necklace I was largely inspired by the notion of decapitation and blood  Tiffany Rowe - OFF WITH HER HEAD!  necklace  Vinyl, acrylic, ribbon.  For this statement necklace I was largely inspired by the notion of decapitation and blood

 Aurélie Dellasanta  - SKELETONS, work 2007-2009 - www.aureliedellasanta.comAurélie Dellasanta  – SKELETONS, work 2007-2009 

Sylvie Godel "Lots of bones" sculpture portable, bijou sculpture - porcelaine Sylvie Godel « Lots of bones » sculpture portable, bijou sculpture – porcelaine 

Bracelet n. t. 2007 9 x 8 x 4,5cm Fine silver, electroformed   behind me – dips eternity before me – immortality myself – the term between. poem by Emily Dickinson www.constanzeschreiber.comConstanze Schreiber – Bracelet n. t. 2007 9 x 8 x 4,5cm Fine silver, electroformed  
behind me
dips eternity
before me
immortality myself 
the term between.
poem by Emily Dickinson 

 Ambroise Degenève - MEMENTO MORI  bracelet feuilles d'or, plâtre, os, or jaune, 2014  Sous un certain angle, un simple cercle d’or, figure hautement symbolique. Le port de la pièce est nécessaire pour éprouver son lent processus d’usure. image d’une vie périssable.Ambroise Degenève – MEMENTO MORI  bracelet feuilles d’or, plâtre, os, or jaune, 2014  Sous un certain angle, un simple cercle d’or, figure hautement symbolique. Le port de la pièce est nécessaire pour éprouver son lent processus d’usure. image d’une vie périssable.

Janus Gallery : Marianne Anselin -   - « 28 janvier 2011 »  - bague -  Broche en feuille du Costa-Rica, résine, argent, or et inox ressort, 2011. 6 cm x 4 cm Arrêter le processus de dégradation naturel d’une feuille en la ramassant.Marianne Anselin «28 janvier 2011»  – bague en feuille du Costa-Rica, résine, argent,  2011. -  Arrêter le processus de dégradation naturel d’une feuille en la ramassant.

 Florie Dupont - THE REMAINS COLLECTION - Bague, argent plaqué or rose, cuir, silicone, perle, 2014Florie Dupont – THE REMAINS COLLECTION – Bague, argent plaqué or rose, cuir, silicone, perle, 2014
Fondée sur une étude délicate et sensuelle de la peau et des surfaces lors d’un stage au Musée d’Histoire Naturelle de Genève à l’atelier de taxidermie, THE REMAINS COLLECTION questionne la beauté de la mort à travers les notions de fonction, d’ornementation et de préciosité. Fondée sur une étude délicate et sensuelle de la peau et des surfaces lors d’un stage au Musée d’Histoire Naturelle de Genève à l’atelier de taxidermie, THE REMAINS COLLECTION questionne la beauté de la mort à travers les notions de fonction, d’ornementation et de préciosité.

  Sarrah Kacem (CH) QUE TOMBENT LES PAILLETTES Pièce unique - Sautoir fait de paillettes et de chaînes facettées en acier - Ecrin en bois – 2013 Dimensions (cm) – Sautoir 105 x 31 x 8 – Ecrin 90 x 18Sarrah Kacem (CH) QUE TOMBENT LES PAILLETTES Pièce unique – Sautoir fait de paillettes et de chaînes facettées en acier – Ecrin en bois – 2013 Dimensions (cm) – Sautoir 105 x 31 x 8 Ecrin 90 x 18
« La paillette évoque généralement une ambiance festive et gaie célébrant la joie de vivre. Lorsqu’elle a une durée de vie limitée tout comme le confetti, elle devient éphémère. Jetée dans l’air, sa trajectoire se termine en jonchant le sol. La paillette abandonnée se meurt et tombe dans l’oubli marquant ainsi la fin des festivités. Seul l’éclat lumineux de sa couleur persiste et chatoie. L’assemblage des paillettes permet de capter les reflets de couleur scintillante de cet instant. Mon défi a été de mettre en valeur et d’apporter de la profondeur à ce matériau souvent considéré comme léger et futile. Par la conception d’un sautoir imposant, je place la paillette au rang d’un élément de parure. »

 Sarrah Kacem - que tombent les paillettes - détail Sarrah Kacem (CH) QUE TOMBENT LES PAILLETTES – détail

 Aude Medori - LA MORT AUX DOIGTS bague poison (2009) argent, ressort acier, seringue, coton 43mm /57mm / 20mm ©photo : Claire PathéJanus Gallery : Aude Medori - LA MORT AUX DOIGTS bague poison (2009) argent, ressort acier, seringue, coton 43mm /57mm / 20mm ©photo : Claire Pathé

Aude Medori - LA MORT AUX DOIGTS bague poison (2009) argent, ressort acier, seringue, coton 43mm/57mm / 20mm ©photo : Claire Pathé
« J’ai réalisé La mort aux doigts en 2009, c’est une de mes pièces de diplôme. J’avais alors choisi de travailler sur le thème de la liberté et des limites qui la définissent, en prenant un axe philosophique. Pour ce faire, j’abordais des questions existentielles telles que : la conscience, le corps, l’espace, le temps, l’autre, les autres, en revisitant des bijoux historiques. Cette pièce correspond en l’occurrence à la question de la liberté face au temps, autrement dit : la question du suicide. Inspirée par la relecture du « Mythe de Sisyphe » de Camus et par les nombreux débats sur l’euthanasie qui avaient lieu en France à ce moment là, je revisitais la bague poison en une bague attelle, proche formellement d’un objet médical. Le geste victorieux (le V si symbolique de l’index et du majeur) permet au système sur ressort de libérer le fatal curare. A manipuler avec précaution… »

 Aude Medori - LA MORT AUX DOIGTS bague poison (2009) argent, ressort acier, seringue, coton 43mm /57mm / 20mm ©photo : Claire PathéAude Medori - LA MORT AUX DOIGTS bague poison (2009) argent, ressort acier, seringue, coton 43mm/57mm / 20mm ©photo : Claire Pathé

La Commune de Montreux et Janus Gallery ont le plaisir de vous annoncer le nom du premier vainqueur de ce concours. Il s’agit de Mme Lucile Burnier, jeune bijoutière contemporaine suisse (1989), issue de la HEAD, qui poursuit actuellement ses études à l’ECAL. Son oeuvre puissante NON CONSIGNÉ sort des sentiers battus, traitant non de la mort individuelle mais de celle collective, par le biais de la mort industrielle. Ses deux colliers, qui faisaient à l’origine partie de son travail de Bachelor, ont surpris les membres du jury par leur maturité, leur puissance leur beauté formelle et leur côté iconoclaste.

Janus Gallery : "la mort vous va si bien" - Lucile Burnier - "NON CONSIGNÉ" est une collection de bijoux sur la mort industrielle européenne - Matériaux : Verre de bouteille bière / vin Coton Porcelaine Bois Vinyl Packaging : Bois Lucile Burnier - « NON CONSIGNÉ » est une collection de bijoux sur la mort industrielle européenne – Matériaux : Verre de bouteille bière / vin Coton Porcelaine Bois Vinyl Packaging : Bois
« NON CONSIGNÉ est une collection de bijoux sur la mort industrielle européenne. Elle est un regard sur notre société qui semble impuissante et indifférente face à cette situation. Au début de mon travail de Bachelor, j’ai été marquée par les évènements qui se déroulaient sur le site sidérurgique de Florange en France. Les conséquences de la mondialisation économique font que l’Industrie européenne est en crise. Elle subit des fermetures, des délocalisations et semble être condamnée à disparaître malgré la ferveur de ses ouvriers qui se battent, corps et âme, pour la préserver. Elle laisse des régions en zone sinistrée, aux paysages industriels en friche et un savoir faire en péril.
J’ai commencé mes recherches par réaliser des illustrations en sérigraphie de ces paysages, à partir de photographies de hauts fourneaux de Berndt et Hilla Becher. J’ai ensuite joué avec les codes, les formes et les matériaux de l’industrie. Je me suis intéressée au rebut comme les bouteilles de bière, contenant en verre banal dont la beauté des formes indiffère. Je les ai coupées et réassemblées ce qui a créé une nouvelle esthétique. De même, par un changement de matériaux, des tuyaux en PVC deviennent précieux et séduisant en porcelaine. Au final, les différents éléments ont été assemblés entre eux par un travail sur les noeuds.
Ma collection, aux pièces imposantes, est un cri face à l’indifférence et l’impuissance. L’orange fluo symbolise cette menace. Les bijoux sont ensuite rangés dans des boîtes en bois inspirées des coffrets à vin, elles sont leurs cercueils.« 

Lucile Burnier - non consigné - Matériaux : Verre de bouteille bière / vin Coton Porcelaine Bois Vinyl Packaging : BoisLucile Burnier – non consigné – Matériaux : Verre de bouteille bière / vin Coton Porcelaine Bois Vinyl Packaging : Bois

A côté de cette oeuvre novatrice, deux autres pièces ont soulevé l’enthousiasme du jury, recevant ainsi une mention: il s’agit du collier VENEER du bijoutier contemporain suisse Kiko Gianocca (1974), et de linstallation NECKLACE OF TEARS de l’artiste contemporaine finlandaise Monica Wickström (1955). Fort différentes l’une de l’autre, ces deux oeuvres contemporaines d’une fragilité émouvantes, s’inscrivent tant dans le mouvement des vanités que dans celui des memento mori.

Kiko Gianocca - “Veneer” Neckpiece 2014 Wood veneer, balsa wood, brass, silverKiko Gianocca – “Veneer” Neckpiece 2014 Wood veneer, balsa wood, brass, silver
« “Veneer” is my latest body of work, it is a series of neckpieces. At first glance a wooden veneer has all the attributes that resemble something dead. It has been so manipulated by man that it is only the ghost of the tree that it once was. As soon I start to work with the veneer however, even just with a little water to give it elasticity, it moves and seems to return somehow to its past life. The pieces’ irregular shapes are also partly inspired by the inkblot images used in a Rorschach test, a method of psychological evaluation. Like in these inkblot images, in my neckpieces you can find references of butterflies, flowers and other elements, symbols that remind us that beauty don’t last and life is short.
Each piece is given a unique shape informed by the grain of the wood. In this way the thin layer of veneer references it’s three-dimensional past as solid wood. Like each of us, these works are made up of different elements, each with their own identity and uniqueness. The final works have a shadow-like presence, representative of something belonging within. I like to think that the neckpiece gives the material from which its made the opportunity, through its shape and moving parts, of a second life »

Monica Wickström - NECKLACE OF TEARS, 2014 installation, 24 g, 350 x 370 x 0,55 mm 24 used single doses of eedropsMonica Wickström – NECKLACE OF TEARS, 2014 installation, 24 g, 350 x 370 x 0,55 mm 24 used single doses of eyedrops

 

JANUS GALLERY
Avenue Claude Nobs 2
CH – 1820 Montreux
+41 (0)21 963 18 84
www.janusgallery.ch
info@janusgallery.com
téléphone : 0041 – 21 963 18 84

 

 

 

 

 

 

MODELSCULPT |
Valérie Salvo |
dochinoiu |
Unblog.fr | Créer un blog | Annuaire | Signaler un abus | Françoise Fourteau-Labarthe
| Aidez les jeunes artistes
| Tableaux de Christian Maillot