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30/05/2013

EXPO ‘La Frontera’ – Museo Franz Mayer, Mexico – 6 Juin-28 Juill. 2013

La Frontera opens June 6 at the Museo Franz Mayer in Mexico City

Exposición que explora el espacio de la frontera y lo que representa, entablando un diálogo entre diferentes artistas que a través de la joyería expresan cómo entienden esta realidad geográfica de implicaciones económicas, políticas, sociales, culturales e ideológicas.  A través de 150 piezas, diseñadas por  90 creadores provenientes de distintos continente se reflexiona sobre nuestra frontera con Estados Unidos y las implicaciones que ésta tiene para cada uno de nosotros.

La Frontera - and then at Velvet da Vinci  August 14 - September 15, 2013

& then :   14 Aout-15 Sept. 2013 : Velvet da Vinci Gallery

La Frontera opens June 6 at the Museo Franz Mayer in Mexico City.    Julia Turner  Three Days Walking (Mourning Brooch)( Julia Turner  Three Days Walking (Mourning Brooch))

« Borders separate but also unite » (Octavio Paz)
Historically the relationship between Mexico and the United States has been complicated, deep, and conflicted. Due to geography, this relationship is unavoidable and comprised of many underlying currents: economic, political, social, cultural, ecologic and ideological.
La Frontera (The Borderlands) is the physical space where the relationship between Mexico and the U.S is most evident. In recent years, drug trafficking and violence have made it the focus of almost daily news. However, the extremely porous nature of the border allows not only the illegal passage of arms and drugs, but also ideas, money, projects, families, and culture.
The border is an environment of opportunity both legal and not. Nearly 2000 miles long, the U.S. – Mexico border is the most frequently crossed international border in the world. Companies use differences in labor and environmental regulations to their advantage and create discontent on both sides of the border. Since the 1980s economic and political refugees from Central America have swelled populations at the border and migrations across it. The construction of the 700- mile U.S. – Mexico Border Fence of the past several years is the most tangible symbol of failed politics.
The exhibition LA FRONTERA seeks to explore this physical space and what it represents. This is why we want artists either born in either of these countries or who live in either of these countries to express how they understand the border.

 Jorge Castañón - "Hacia dónde va tu Sangre ? " -   'LA FRONTERA' exhibition -   Algunas veces queremos cruzarlas, otras , necesitamos cruzarlas, buscando recomenzar, renacer, una segunda oportunidad posiblemente.  Tal vez nuestros cuerpos puedan lograrlo, pero … qué será de nuestro corazón, nos acompañará?  Qué buscamos y qué dejamos, dos ideas de signos opuestos que nunca se igualan.  Nace una herida, que eternamente intentaremos que cicatrice.Jorge Castañón – « Hacia dónde va tu Sangre ?  »
http://www.franzmayer.org.mx/  La frontera(Donna d’Aquino jewelry )

 

Iacov Azubel bracelet, "¿Son necesarias las fronteras?"Iacov Azubel bracelet, « ¿Son necesarias las fronteras? »

 

Museo Franz Mayer
Hidalgo 45, Centro Historico, Cuauhtémoc,
06300 Ciudad de México, DF, Mexique
Téléphone :+52 55 5518 2266

22/08/2010

EXPO ‘Think Twice: New Latin American Jewellery’ – Museum of Arts and Design of New York (USA) – 13 Oct 2010-8 Janv. 2011

Museum of Arts and Design of new York (MAD) – (New York City) -  13-Oct-2010 – 08-Jan-2011 
Think Twice: New Latin American Jewelry Showcases Contemporary Jewelry From The Region For The First Time In a U.S. Museum

« Think Twice: New Latin American Jewelry, presented by the Museum of Arts and Design from October 12, 2010 through January 8, 2011, will feature unique work by nearly 60 jewelry makers, representing over 20 Latin American countries. Among the artists included are the Brazilians Mirla Fernandes, Dionea Rocha Watt, and Claudia Cucchi; Valentina Rosenthal and Walka Studio from Chile; the Argentinians Elisa Gulminelli, Francisca Kweitel, and Silvina Romero; Jorge Manilla, Martacarmela Sotelo and Eduardo Graue from Mexico; and Miguel Luciano from Puerto Rico. 
The show has been guest-curated by the Netherlands-based, Mexican-born architect and historian Valeria Vallarta Siemelink. 
Objects of adornment have played a significant cultural role throughout Latin America’s history, from the spiritually potent jewelry of the pre-Columbians to the eye-catching ornaments worn by Mexican drug gangs to advertise their status and menace. Now a new generation of jewelry makers working outside the field’s conventions are examining how this complex relationship with physical adornment evolved–and why. 
Think Twice aims to bring the audience a clear picture of the landscape of contemporary jewellery in Latin America and its development in the last 10 years, showing the way in which visual artists and jewellery makers born or living in Latin America view and relate, through jewellery, to such a vast and diverse continent. 
The exhibition, conceived by Otro Diseño, is born out of a passion for jewellery as a medium of personal and cultural expression and of the conviction that the fresh, intense and highly creative work of Latin American jewellery makers outstandingly represents and nurtures the culture they live in and therefore greatly enriches and diversifies the international landscape of contemporary jewellery.
“The new Latin American jewelry must be appreciated for what it is. One shouldn’t impose stereotypes or resort to clichés,” says guest-curator Valeria Vallarta Siemelink. “Far from being an imported concept from the West, jewelry-as-art in Latin America is very much a product of the region’s history and its diverse and dynamic modern societies.” 
“This is a very special show,” adds Ursula Neuman, MAD’s jewelry curator. “This jewelry is virtually unknown in the United States. The artists’ realize their sophisticated concepts through intriguing choices of materials and techniques, creating unique works that present a fascinating amalgam of indigenous cultural elements and the latest trends in international contemporary jewelry design.

” To bring clarity to Latin America’s complex culture and history, the exhibition is organized around three themes, addressing the region’s past, its unique fusion of ethnic influences, and its ever-changing socio-political realities. 

History, Memory, Tradition
The tension between tradition and modernity is crucial to Latin American history. Heritage and memory, both personal and collective, are among the subjects expressed by these artists through pre-Columbian and colonial jewelry methods and traditional craft techniques. Take the Colombian Mariana Shuk. She has made a series of rings using traditional ring shanks ordered from mega-jewelry suppliers. She creates a ring by interlacing two identical shanks. Its shape determines which techniques—stone setting, enameling, filigree—she will employ to customize it in the Colombian colonial style. The process has produced a perplexing assortment of rings that confronts past and present, value and insignificance. By contrast, another Columbian artist, Linda Sanchez, creates her jewelry pieces by employing weaving techniques that have been used by an Amazonian tribe since ancient times. 
A Flair for Invention
The artists in this section are some of the boldest jewelry makers anywhere. Skilled at improvisation, they make brilliant use of a rich variety of native materials along with such everyday objects as balloons and drawer handles. A spontaneous attitude and a contrary vision are central to their daring approach. The Mexican Andres Quiñones can make an exquisite choker from sticks of bamboo, a few broken guitar strings, a handful of freshwater pearls and silver wire, all of the materials collected from garbage dumpsters in Mexico City. Colombian Helena Biermann presents Hit the Road, a series of brooches that collect the insects stuck to a car in its 286 km trip from Munchen, Germany to Domaslav, Czech Republic. 
Forging Identity: Latin America as a Source of Inspiration 
These jewelry makers are creating an individualistic language, expressive of who they are and where they come from. Art, religion, money, violence, tradition, family, gender are among the themes that define their lives, uniting their collective and individual identities. Foreign-born artists, who are somehow bound up with Latin America or have had a profound impact upon it, are included in this section. Alcides Fortes, for example, was born in Cape Verde, trained as a gold and silversmith in the Netherlands, and today lives and works in Mexico. He specializes in politically charged jewelry, creating such works as a necklace made out of the porcelain portraits recovered from the graves of a family killed in the Mexican revolution. The piece reveals both an admiration for Mexico’s culture and history as well as a loathing of its corruption, economic disparities, and veiled racism. By transforming the common objects of his native land into fetishized commodities, Miguel Luciano examines how American consumerism has affected Puerto Rican culture. Plantainum, for example, is a series of necklaces and pendants featuring a platinum-covered plantain. The shell is seductive and pristine, but underneath the fruit is rotting. 
Figurative and abstract, conceptual and symbolic, traditional and experimental, contemporary Latin American jewelry is tremendously varied, and it is this diversity that enables it to communicate its ethnicity and to transcend it. » (Klimt02)
Artist list:
Mirla Fernandes (Brasil),Kehisha Castello, Helena Biermann (Col.), Tota Reciclados (Arg.), Udi Lagallina (Bresil), Martacarmela Sotelo (Mex.), Kika Alvarenga (Brasil), Silvina Romero (Arg.), Elisa Gulminelli (Arg.), Zinna Rudman, Célio Braga, Martha Camargo, Maria Paula Amezcua, Magali Anidjar (Arg.), Walka Studio (Chile), Mauricio Lara, Gabriela Horvat (Arg.), Jorge Castañón, Nilton Cunha, Jimena Rios, Thelma Aviani, Alcides Fortes (Cape verde), Samantha Fung, Alex Bourttiea, Marie Pendaries, Renata Porto, Martha Hryc, Teresa Margolles, Paula Isola, Beate Eismann, Aurelie Dellasanta (CH), Giselle Morales, Fiorenza Coredro, Francisca Kweitel (Arg.), Alina López, Ana Paula Campos, Dionea Rocha Watt (Brasil), Eduardo Graue (Mex.), Mariana Shuk (Col.), Stella Bierrenbach, Hugo Celi, Luis Acosta, Isel Mendoza, Dani Soter, Linda Sánchez (Col.), Andrés Fonseca, Ana Videla, Alex Burke, Benjamin Lignel, Alejandra Agusti, Lucia Abdenur, Claudia Cucchi (Brasil), Chequita Nahar, Ariel Kuipfer, Ximena Briceno, Julieta Odio, Guigui Kohon (Esp.), Nuria Carulla, Santiago Ayala, Carlos Martiel, Jorge Manilla(Mex.).

http://learntobead.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/latin171.jpg
Silvina Romero (Argentina)

EXPO Think Twice - Mirla FernandezMirla Fernandes (Brasil) – necklace

http://otro-diseno.com/blog/wp-content/uploads/2010/09/celio0.jpg
Celio Braga, Brazil

AURÉLIE DELLASANTA - Switzerland/Mexico - Suicide Brooch, 2007 Painted metal, gilded metal, paper  (THINK TWICE)Aurelie Dellasanta – ‘suicide brooch’ 2007 painted metal, gilded metal, paper

http://learntobead.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/latin15.jpg
 Francisca Kweitel (Arg.)

guigui kohon -   Basuradejoyería 2010.Guigui Kohon -’Basura de joyería’ – Jewelry waste 2010

Chequita  Nahar - brooch - Think Twice: New Latin American Jewellery at the MAD NYC - Chequita Nahar Lontai – brooch, 2010, oak, porcelain, string

EXPO 'Think Twice: New Latin American Jewellery' - Museum of Arts and Design of New York (USA) - 13 Oct 2010-8 Janv. 2011 dans Amerique Latine dans Andres FONSECA (Col.)
 

 

 

 

 

Kika Alvarenga (Bresil)

 Jorge Manilla - Palabras ( Think Twice)Jorge Manilla – ‘Palabras’

http://learntobead.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/latin211.jpg
Jorge Manilla – necklace ‘de votos y ex-votos’

http://learntobead.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/latin4.jpg
Dionea Rocha Watt (Brazil) – ‘Vanitas’ – image made with silver dust

 dans Aurelie DELLASANTA (CH)Claudia Cucchi (Brazil) – Brooch-  Untitled 2005 – Silk, perspex, nylon, emerald

http://learntobead.files.wordpress.com/2010/08/latin13.jpg
Elisa Gulminelli (Argentina) 

http://api.ning.com/files/wVJn1eTqNLyfvZQOQMrKL4ziP7lL-1*38K029P6Zsl2HIJqgb*7pLf8bMG5MNSExOPu-OtShWBD16Z81p2xg70d*aN0CKNCV/IMG_5997.JPG?transform=rotate(90)&width=450&height=600
Udi Lagallina (Brasil) – brooch

Gabriela Horvat, Necklace, 2009Gabriela Horvat, Sin titulo necklace 2009

Jorge Castañon, Dos cuencos brooch - nickel silver and woodJorge Castañon, Dos cuencos brooch – nickel silver and wood

[lineas+ropa+mezclilla+roja.jpg]
Martacarmela Sotelo (Mex.) – collares linea ropa- proceso lineas ropa mezclilla roja

Marta HRYC - "aplastada"Marta HrycAplastada – Plata, algodon. 2009

http://www.totareciclados.com.ar/007.jpg
TotaReciclados (Arg) (Marcela Muñiz + Valeria Hasse)

 

Museum of Arts and Design of New York (MAD)
2 Columbus Circle (59th Street and Broadway)
NY 10019 – New York City
United States
Telephone: 212.299.7777
Fax: 212.299.7701
website: www.madmuseum.org
mail: info@madmuseum.org

Joyeros Argentinos

 

24/03/2010

EXPO ‘Walking the Gray Area’ Galeria Emilia Cohen, Mexico – 15 April-15 Mai 2010

Walking the Gray Area : A dialog on global mobility, identities and contemporary jewellery

Walking the Gray Area will premiere at Galeria Emilia Cohen in Mexico City, within the frame of the Gray Area Symposium Mexico 2010.

EXPO GRAY - Andrea Wagner Piece- Greener Grass on the Other Side 2010
Andrea Wagner Piece- Greener Grass on the Other Side 2010 – papier maché, silver, paint

Contemporary jewellery, with its exceptional ability to communicate and create associations directly connected to specific cultural and personal settings and backgrounds seems to be circumscribed to a rather westernized discourse. It has become necessary for contemporary jewellery-makers to rethink the ways they connect with others.

40 artists, from an uncertain total number of  involved countries, take a walk on the gray area and explore,  through the already ambiguous field of contemporary jewellery,  issues related to global mobility, identity and territories in dispersion and the way they perceive and have been affected by this phenomena during their rambling around the world.
Walking the Gray Area is a collective, comissioned exhibition curated by Valeria Siemelink and Andrea Wagner, that bring together 20 Latin American and 20 European jewellery makers and artists who ocationally work with jewellery as a medium, into a dialogue about jewellery, global mobility, contemporary identities and its personal and/or collective implications.

The curators of Walking the Gray Area, selected each 20 artists from their respective continents:  Latin America and Europe. The artists were individually selected based on their artistic excellence, technical abilities and creative response to various subjects. As a collective, the group was conformed based on the on the tensions between their discourses and practices, their varied and experimental approach in the use of materials and techniques and on the rich possibilities that lay on the exchange among them. There is, however, one thing that all the invited artists have in common : like the curators, they are or have all been migrants; born in one place, living, working or studying in another one.

The artists work in couples and were paired randomly: the names of the Latin American artists were written on a piece of paper, which was folded and placed in a bowl. The same was done with the names of the European artists. The curators had fun taking turns to pick a name from one bowl and pairing it with a name from the other bowl. 20 couples were formed and, for the last six months they carried out a dialogue through the pages of a weblog specially created for this purpose. The artists conducted their dialogues in ways they find interesting or relevant: exchanging conversations, stories, images and even materials. Besides their periodical postings in the blog, the artists exchanged letters and parcels through the post, organized Skype sessions, phoned and even meet in person. The weblog has allowed the artists to reach a diverse, distant and growing audience, having attracted over 10 thousand visitors from nearly 90 countries.

Through the exchange both artists and curators aimed to respond to a variety of questions: How do they respond to changing definitions of mobility, locality, globalism, migration?  How do the changing conceptions of identities relate to their being and practice? How do they reconcile their roots with their routes? What kind of exchange can take place between artists from areas of the world where contemporary jewellery is perceived and dealt with in such different ways? How can they relate to and diverse, moving, fast changing audience?

EXPO GRAY - Helena Biermann Angel- Piece- Sabor a Ti 2010 EXPO GRAY- Agnieszka KNAP- Necklace- The Grass is Not Greener on the Other Side of the Fence 2010EXPO GRAY- Alejandra Solar - piece 2010EXPO GRAY- Carolina HORNAUER - necklace 'el Coleccionista' 2010

Helena Biermann Angel-  set of pendants  ‘Sabor a Ti’ 2010 – glass vials, fruit seeds, quartz, cotton, wood box
Agnieszka KNAP- Necklace- The Grass is Not Greener on the Other Side of the Fence 2010- silver, copper, enamel
Alejandra Solar – piece 2010 – wood, print, cotton pendants
Carolina HORNAUER - necklace ‘el Coleccionista’ 2010 Hair, cotton, fresh water pearls, patina, steel, cooper, enamel, magnets, burnt wood, silver, stone

EXPO GRAY- Peter HOOGEBOOM - pi 2010' necklace- Ceramics, nyEXPO GRAY- Theri Tolvanen-  brooch 'Chenonceau'Mirla Fernandes 'Riv Anda Hit' 2010 - latex, pigments -EXPO GRAY -EXPO GRAY- Valentina Rosenthal -necklaces.jpg

Peter HOOGEBOOM – pi 2010′ necklace- Ceramics, nylon, alpaca, gold leaf
Terhi Tolvanen- Cherry wood, paint, beads, gold, silver – brooch ‘Chenonceau’
Mirla Fernandes ‘Riv Anda Hit’ 2010 – latex, pigments
Valentina Rosenthal - Silver, wood, nails, glass, porcelain, bronz, mirror, enamel necklaces 

 

Artists:
Miguel Luciano (puerto rico) & Leonor Hipolito (portugal), Ketli Tiitsar (estonia) & Chequita Nahar (surinam), Karin Seufert (germany) & María Constanza Ochoa (colombia), Célio Braga (brazil) & Gemma Draper (spain). Carla Castaigo (portugal) & Valentina Rosenthal (chile), Francisca Kweitel (argentina) & Nelli Tanner (finland), Maria Jose Fabrega (costa rica) & Agnieszka Knap (poland), Andrea Wagner (netherlands) & Carolina Hornauer (chile), Susanne Klemm (netherlands) & Samantha Fung (venezuela), Jorge Manilla (mexico) & Christoph Zellweger (switzerland), Luzia Vogt (switzerland) &  Thelma Aviani (brazil), Terhi Tolvanen (finland) & Guigui Kohon (argentina), Helena Biermann Angel (colombia) & Hanna Hedman (sweden), Mia Maljojoki (germany) & Alejandra Solar (mexico), Mirla Fernandes (brazil) & Kajsa Lindberg (sweden), Dani Soter (brazil) & Sebastian Buescher (uk), Ineke Heerkens (netherlands) & Julieta Odio (costa rica), Walka Studio (chile) & Natalie Luder (switzerland), Eduardo Graue (mexico) & Peter Hoogeboom (netherlands), Jantje Fleischhut (netherlands) & Andres Fonseca (colombia).

Karin SEUFERT- Piece '9 Brooches'  2010- pvc, cotton, steel, silver
Karin SEUFERT- Piece ’9 Brooches’  2010- pvc, cotton, steel, silver

Gemma Draper 01
 Gemma Draper – Electroformed Copper, Enamel and Wood – 2008

Galeria Emilia Cohen
Palmas 1320
Lomas – Mexico City (Mexico)
Tel : +52 55 5281 0009
Tel : +52 55 5281 0029
mail: info@otro-diseno.com
website: http://www.emiliacohen.com/

 

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