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31/12/2016

EXPO – ’0 + 0 = 0′ – Christchurch Art Gallery (NEW ZEALAND) – 16 Dec. 2016 – 2 Avr. 2017

Classé dans : Exposition/Exhibition,GALERIES,Lisa WALKER (DE/NZ),Nlle Zelande (NZ),www Klimt02 — bijoucontemporain @ 14:08

0 + 0 = 0 by Lisa Walker

Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu presents an exclusive exhibition of new and recent works by this internationally acclaimed artist, who received the prestigious Françoise van den Bosch Award in 2010 and became an Arts Foundation Laureate in 2015

Lisa Walker Artist Talk.  Wednesday, 15 February 2017 / 6pm
Artist Lisa Walker’s extreme, iconoclastic jewellery has been described as ‘the physical manifestation of the mental and virtual baggage of living NOW’.

0 + 0=0 by Lisa Walker Exhibition  /  16 Dec 2016  -  02 Apr 2017 - Christchurch Art Gallery -  Place     Cnr Worcester Blvd and Montreal St     Christchurch     NEW ZEALAND: (Lisa Walker Necklace: Untitled, 2016 Fabric, stuffing Courtesy of the artist and Funaki Gallery, Melbourne)

It might be tempting to say that Lisa Walker makes jewellery out of any old thing – but it isn’t true. The eclectic objects that form her distinctive necklaces, brooches and other body-adornments are meticulously selected and shrewdly modified before they see the light of day. She salvages her materials from an unlikely cornucopia of sources – re-presenting objects such as car parts, animal skins and even kitchen utensils through the frame of body adornment’s long history. Tiny Lego hats, helmets and hairpieces – of the kind that clog vacuum cleaner nozzles in children’s bedrooms around the world – are strung on finely plaited cords like exotic beads or shells; trashy gossip magazines are lashed together to yield a breastplate befitting our celebrity-obsessed culture; dozens of oboe reeds donated by a musician friend bristle round the wearer’s neck like the teeth of some unimaginable deep sea leviathan.
Walker’s work doesn’t sit comfortably within the contours of conventional jewellery – it squirms, fidgets, stretches and unravels. ‘I want to make pieces that don’t fit any of those jewellery recipes, yet still make sense as jewellery,’ she once said.1 In a field known for refined finishes and seamless construction, her audaciously sized, deliberately low-tech pieces inject a blast of pure creative oxygen, wilfully disobeying established jewellery conventions and confounding audience expectations. Despite their bodged-up, glued-together appearance and gleefully tacky origins, Walker’s works are anything but haphazard – rather they are elevated by her acute sense of colour and composition and healthy sense of irony. The new and recent pieces included in her Christchurch Art Gallery show, 0 + 0 = 0, explore a range of critical concerns; confronting jewellery-specific preconceptions about wearability and craftsmanship, they also investigate the politics of value, identity and appropriation.
…..
While some of Walker’s materials are amassed close to home – she once made a necklace from six months’ worth of detritus collected from her studio floor – she also ranges more widely, combing the world of the non-precious for idiosyncratic treasures. Together with physical objects, she collects memories and associations, a process made explicit in Trip to Europe 1973 (2011), a necklace, constructed from the postcards, train tickets, concert programmes and other souvenirs a ‘cultured couple’ offered for sale on Trade Me. For Walker, having just returned home after fifteen years spent living in Germany, the mementos spoke of New Zealand’s complex history of arrivals – including those of Māori and European settlers – and of how cultures are transported, translated and transformed. Recent pieces such as Pendant (2016) reflect her interest in (and ambivalence about) exchange and appropriation and especially how these might play out within a New Zealand context. Assembled from pounamu offcuts given to Walker by a sculptor friend, Pendantcombines varied surfaces cut from several different stones, offering a beautiful, but deliberately problematic, addition to the tradition of Māori taonga.

Lisa Walker Dick Necklace 2016  Lisa Walker Dick Necklace 2016

Despite the irreverence of its title, and the ubiquitous banality of the phallic graffiti that inspired it, another, equally serious, reclamation prompted the creation of Dick Necklace (2016).
I live with the challenges of a patriarchal world and [its] hideous anti-women history. I’m intrigued by the online activity of the younger feminists. I was always impressed by Louise Bourgeois’s giant bronze cast penis sculpture [Filette (1968)]. Many years ago I saw a postcard of her as a 70-something year old woman, standing next to it with her hand gently, but authoritatively, resting on the giant penis. ‘Dick and balls’ drawings are a cultural phenomenon; we grow up with these scrawlings everywhere. The penis can be symbolically positive and negative; fertility and love, but also rape, misogyny, imbalance of power. As a feminist I now take, claim, and interpret it for myself, twisting its symbology into something else.
‘I learned a long time ago that you don’t have to find the answers. It’s enough for the works to keep asking the questions.’
The thorny issue of copying and influence has long fascinated Walker, gaining new relevance as social media allows for the increasingly unrestricted distribution and repurposing of imagery of all kinds. She joined Instagram, the online image-sharing service, in 2015 and describes it as a ‘huge hunting ground’,2 admitting she is now influenced more by what she finds online than by actual, ‘real world’ objects. A posted shot of Masturbine (1984), a well-known work by the renowned contemporary Swiss duo Peter Fischli and David Weiss, prompted her own Fischli & Weiss Bracelet(2016), which replaces the original’s whorl of expensive leather footwear with budget heels from her local Number One Shoes warehouse. A photograph of a cellphone bound up in the twisted cord of an old-school desk phone, uploaded by the Los Angeles-based artists Mitra Saboury and Derek Paul Boyle under the Instagram nomenclature ‘Meatwreck’, proved irresistible. Walker recreated it, almost exactly, in the form of an oversized pendant and, though she remains delighted with the piece, doesn’t shy away from the questions about ownership and creative license this kind of borrowing provokes. In fact, the discomfort inherent in such appropriation is shared by artist and collectors, since Walker’s works are primarily designed not to be displayed politely indoors, but to travel with their wearers out into the wild, wide open of the public domain. ‘I learned a long time ago that you don’t have to find the answers,’ she says, ‘It’s enough for the works to keep asking the questions.
  If the eclectic forms of Walker’s work reflect the democracy and limitless possibility of our new open-source world, her ‘more is more’ aesthetic also suggests the sense of chaos and overload it can provoke. With every online image potentially linked to thousands more, how could you ever see it all? Excessive, oversized, popping at the seams with look-at-me impudence, Walker’s works draw upon and reflect the unrelenting abundance of modern life. And yet, taken one piece at a time, they’re much more than thrown-together clickbait. At its most anarchic, jewellery that is created to be worn still requires its maker to take into account a series of considerations that don’t constrain other art forms, like painting or sculpture. As she creates her pieces, often concealing traditional jewellery processes beneath contemporary kitsch, Walker thinks about weight, scale, durability, and how her pieces will relate to the yet-unknown body they are destined to adorn. Having thrown out the rulebooks in her early practice, she now values the technical challenges these self-imposed limits present, enjoying how they slow things down and distil her attention, demanding mindful focus in a fast-moving world. In discussion, it soon becomes apparent that this process fuels, rather than suppresses, Walker’s high-voltage imagination. Recalling a project in which she turned an entire building (City Gallery Wellington) into a brooch by clipping a giant mild-steel safety chain to its ceiling and attaching the other end to a wearer via an enormous pin, she mischievously refers to it as only her ‘second largest work’. She’s not kidding; the scale of that audacious project is effortlessly eclipsed by another one. Existing, so far, in solely conceptual form it features a chain, pinned to its wearer, with planet Earth on the other end.  Felicity Milburn, Curator

Lisa Walker Pendant: Untitled, 2016 Pounamu, silver, thread Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Biro, Munich: Lisa Walker Pendant: Untitled, 2016 Pounamu, silver, thread Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Biro, Munich
Lisa Walker Necklace: Untitled, 2015 Plastic, thread Courtesy of the artist and Masterworks Gallery, Auckland: Lisa Walker Necklace: Untitled, 2015 Plastic, thread Courtesy of the artist and Masterworks Gallery, Auckland
Lisa Walker  Pendant: Untitled, 2016  Egg beater, thread.  Courtesy of the artist and The National, Christchurch: Lisa Walker  Pendant: Untitled, 2016  Egg beater, thread.  Courtesy of the artist and The National, Christchurch
Lisa Walker  Necklace: Trip to Europe 1973, 2011  Documents, brass, string  Courtesy of the artist: Lisa Walker  Necklace: Trip to Europe 1973, 2011  Documents, brass, string  Courtesy of the artist
Lisa Walker Fischli & Weiss Bracelet 2016. Shoes. Courtesy of the artist  Lisa Walker Fischli & Weiss Bracelet 2016. Shoes. Courtesy of the artist
Christchurch Art Gallery
Cnr Worcester Blvd and Montreal St
Christchurch
NEW ZEALAND
Mail:  info@christchurchartgallery.org.nz

 

12/06/2016

EXPO ‘Regard sur la Nouvelle Zélande’ – Espace Solidor, Cagnes-sur-Mer (FR) – 24 Juin-20 oct. 2016

Espace Solidor, Cagnes sur mer (FR) :

Regard sur la Nouvelle-Zélande

Jewellery from Aotearoa
Vernissage : vendredi 24 juin 2016 à 18h

 

Espace Solidor, Cagnes sur mer (FR) -  Regard su la Nlle Zélande - 24 juin-2oct 2016:

 

Pour cette nouvelle exposition, l’Espace Solidor présentera
huit artistes néo-zélandais :  Alan Preston Warwick Freeman – Areta Wilkinson — Moniek ShriverCraig MacIntosh — Roy Mason — Matthew Mc Intyre Wilson — Lisa Walker.
Leurs créations sont profondément imprégnées de la nature qui les entoure ou encore de la culture Maori.

 Moniek Schrijer - Pièce de cou: Moniek Schrijer – Pièce de cou 2016
Craig McIntosh - Bague: Craig McIntosh – Bague – argilite, argent – 2013
Areta Wilkinson - « Hei Tupa »: Areta Wilkinson – « Hei Tupa »
Matthew McIntyre-Wilson Broche de la collection - «The Price of Change»:
Matthew McIntyre-Wilson Broche de la collection – «The Price of Change»
Espace Solidor
place du Château
06400, Cagnes-sur-Mer – France
Tél : 04 93 73 14 42
espace.solidor@orange.fr
Navette gratuite N°44, au départ de la station centrale de bus (rotation toutes les 15 minutes).
Octobre à avril : du mercredi au dimanche de 14h à 17h
Mai, juin et septembre: du mercredi au dimanche de 14h à 18h
Juillet et août: du mardi au dimanche de 14h à 18h

 

23/02/2016

During SCHMUCK 2016 : EXPO ‘SPECIALS, HandShake Alumni exhibition’ – Einsäulensaal, Munich (DE) – 25-27 Fevr. 2016

SPECIALS, a HandShake Alumni exhibition
21 jewellery artists from New Zealand

#42

Celebration day (artists present) 25.02 14.00 – 16.00

SPECIALS, a HandShake Alumni exhibition #42

SPECIALS, a HandShake Alumni exhibition features twenty one jewellery artists from New Zealand showing at the Einsäulensaal in the Munich Residenz Palace from 25 – 27 February 2016.
Peter Deckers has curated a special selection of works and projects from the HANDSHAKE programme. This one-off exhibition showcases the best work from the 12 national and international exhibitions over the last 5 years.

The HANDSHAKE Project is an art development programme for progressive ideas, making, presentations, feedback and networking for contemporary New Zealand jewellers.
The project began in February 2011, with emerging jewellers matched in mentoring roles with their chosen idols from all across the globe. Each mentee’s development was not only supported by their mentor but also through a series of workshops, masterclasses and most importantly, exhibitions in prestigious galleries in NZ and beyond.
The HandShake project will begin its third iteration (HandShake3) following the SPECIALS Alumni exhibition. Selected jewellers have been chosen from the first two projects to develop new bodies of work for a fresh series of international exhibitions, with a focus on collaboration in its broadest sense. The purpose of this HS3 programme is to allow the former mentee to become an independent artist, steering their own developments. The mentor now becomes a colleague and in most cases also a fellow art collaborator.

Handshake 3 participants:  Amelia PascoeBecky Bliss — Debbie Adamson — Kelly McDonald — Nadene CarrSarah Walker-HoltRaewyn Walsh — Neke Moa — Renee Bevan — Sarah Read — Kathryn YeatsSharon Fitness

SPECIALS, HANDSHAKE PROJECT -  Alumni exhibition -  Kathryn Yeats, necklace 2015: Kathryn Yeats, necklace 2015

  Jhana Millers with mentor Suska Mackert, HandShake 1, Objectspace, Auckland (2013): Jhana Millers with mentor Suska Mackert, HandShake 1, Objectspace, Auckland (2013)

 Sarah Walker-Holt , necklace (2015):  Sarah Walker-Holt , necklace (2015)

HANDSHAKE alumni .... - - by Renee Bevan Premonition #1 2014Renee Bevan Premonition #1 2014

HANDSHAKE alumni - Sharon Fitness 2015: Sharon Fitness 2015

 

Einsäulensaal
Munich Residenz Palace
Residenzstraße 1, 80333 München
Germany

 

27/04/2015

EXPO ‘Stonecutting’ – Gallery Velvet da Vinci, San Francisco (USA) – 1er-31 Mai 2015

 San Francisco’s VELVET DA VINCI is proud to present Stonecutting, an exhibition of work by New Zealand artists Craig McIntosh + Joe Sheehan
Opening reception with the artists will take place on Friday, May 1, from 6-8 pm.

 StoneCutting - Velvet da Vinci

 

Craig McIntosh’s most recent series of brooches are hand carved and fabricated from Pakohe (argillite), a material rich with metaphor for New Zealand’s cultural and natural landscape. A highly indurated sedimentary rock, hardened through intense compression and heat, Pakohe is often described as “basement rock,” as it literally represents the material New Zealand is built from and upon. Calling to mind visions of topographical maps and aerial nature photographs, McIntosh’s process channels the aesthetic and symbolic implications of his material, resulting in fractured, layered, and laminated compositions. According to the artist:
“The brooches… are abstract forms arrived at through the making process, and the associations with landscape and boundary are the result of thinking through making. When I’m working with stone I take the perspective that I am in some way are some way working with land, or can be seen as working with place, or even working possibly with here…. Landscape is a human construct, it is the way we see and interpret the physical environment. The division and breaking up of land into the idea of a system of human made spaces has shaped our environment. So for me it is therefore critical, when using stone in a contemporary jewelry context to have an understanding of both identity and boundary, jewelry can not be made concerning anything else until this is considered.”
McIntosh earned a Bachelors of Visual Arts and Masters Degree from the Dunedin School for Art. His works have exhibited in Japan, New Zealand, and Germany. Highlighted shows include WUNDERRUMA, a touring exhibition that debuted at the 2014 Schmuck conference. The artist presently lives and works in Dunedin.

Craig McIntosh, Pakohe Brooch 004, 2015, Carved Pakohe (Argillite), 1.85 x .25 x 2.15″Craig McIntosh, Pakohe Brooch 004, 2015, Carved Pakohe (Argillite), 1.85 x .25 x 2.15″

Craig McIntosh, Pakohe Brooch 006, 2015, Carved Pakohe (Argillite), 2.15 x .25 x 2.15″Craig McIntosh, Pakohe Brooch 006, 2015, Carved Pakohe (Argillite), 2.15 x .25 x 2.15″

Craig McIntosh, Pakohe Brooch 0011, 2015, Carved Pakohe (Argillite), 1.65 x .35 x 2.80″Craig McIntosh, Pakohe Brooch 0011, 2015, Carved Pakohe (Argillite), 1.65 x .35 x 2.80″

Craig McIntosh, Pakohe Brooch 003, 2015, Carved Pakohe (Argillite), 3.65 x .25 x 2″Craig McIntosh, Pakohe Brooch 003, 2015, Carved Pakohe (Argillite), 3.65 x .25 x 2″

Joe Sheehan’s series The Quick and the Dead is a collection of remote controls meticulously carved from stone.   Presented as artifacts in the style of classic typological museum display, the work takes the form of whole units and broken pieces, calling to mind futuristic archaeological documentations of contemporary culture. Arranged by similarity and type, the series poses questions about contemporary methods in museum studies, addressing notions of preservation and historiography from a global perspective. Working with New Zealand native stones such as greywacke, basalt, and argillite, Sheehan shines a light on the heavy historic symbolism of each material from a South Pacific cultural context, referencing prominent museum collections of Toki: stone adzes made by Maori and other Polynesian cultures.

Joe Sheehan, The Quick and the Dead (Group 5), Greywacke, basalt, argillite, Sizes vary. Photo Credit: Kallan MacLeod.Joe Sheehan, The Quick and the Dead (Group 5), Greywacke, basalt, argillite, Sizes vary. Photo Credit: Kallan MacLeod.

Joe Sheehan, The Quick and the Dead (Group 4), Carved basalt, Sizes vary. Photo Credit: Kallan MacLeod.Joe Sheehan, The Quick and the Dead (Group 4), Carved basalt, Sizes vary. Photo Credit: Kallan MacLeod. 
Velvet da Vinci
2015 Polk Street,
San Francisco, CA 94109
Phone: 415-441-0109
Email:  info@velvetdavincigallery.com
Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11am – 6pm, Sunday, 11am – 4pm.

 

05/12/2014

COUP de COEUR : Lisa Higgins

Classé dans : COUP DE COEUR,Gal. Fingers (NZ),Lisa HIGGINS (NZ),Nlle Zelande (NZ) — bijoucontemporain @ 2:37
Lisa Higgins graduated with Advanced Diploma (Jewellery) from Hungry Creek Art & Craft School (NZ) in 2012.
« Her work shows an interesting interaction between material and form, she has moved her practice forward having left the confines of school, to produce work that sits well with her ideas and intentions. » Shane Hartdegen
« Someone once told me that to repeat a process over and over and to expect a different outcome is, in itself, the definition of madness… I believe the opposite to be true.
Broken down to its tiniest detail every moment – thought/action and reaction will be different. So influenced, are we by environmental factors and the idiosyncrasies of the human condition, that we manage our existence, but never fully control it.
Continuing to explore form and the preservation of memory ‘Overexposed’ is the result of material led exploration which challenges expectations and control between material and maker, whilst repeated detailing draws the eye to the subtitles and inevitability of change. » Lisa Higgins, 2013

Lisa Higgins - 'Overexposed 2013' 1.  Necklace  - Rubber, copper, mixed mediaLisa Higgins – ‘Overexposed 2013′ 1.  Necklace  – Rubber, copper, mixed media

Lisa Higgins - Necklace - Rubber, glass, stainless steel, wax cordLisa Higgins – Necklace – Rubber, glass, stainless steel, wax cord

Lisa Higgins - Necklace - Rubber, copper, brass, stainless steel, mixed media, wax cordLisa Higgins – Necklace – Rubber, copper, brass, stainless steel, mixed media, wax cord

Lisa Higgins - brooch  - Rubber, mixed media, stainless steelLisa Higgins - brooch  – Rubber, mixed media, stainless steel

Lisa Higgins -  Brooch - Rubber, 925 silver, mixed media, stainless steelLisa Higgins -  Brooch – Rubber, 925 silver, mixed media, stainless steel

Lisa Higgins - Protection II, pendant, 2013 - Rubber, sterling silver, mixed media, waxed cordLisa Higgins – Protection II, pendant, 2013 – Rubber, sterling silver, mixed media, waxed cord

30/11/2014

EXPO ‘Handshake 2′ – Toi Poneke Arts Centre, Wellington (NZ) -21 Nov.-13 Dec. 2014

Hand shake 2
***
The three-phase Handshake project embraces and showcases new pathways in art education by giving post-graduation jewellers the opportunity to be mentored by internationally established and well-respected artists of their choice. The culmination of its second phase, the exhibition Handshake 2, will present the work of a select group of thirteen mentees. Half way through a two year professional development programme, their practice, techniques and materials can be seen to have already been expanded and enriched.
with :
Vanessa ArthurAmelia Pascoe — Suni Hermon — Karren Dale — Julia Middleton — Kelly McDonald – Lisa HigginsKathryn YeatsRaewyn WalshRenee BevanSarah Walker-HoltSoo Jeong LeeTineke Jansen

The mentees and mentors are:

Amelia Pascoe and Ruudt Peters  /  Julia Middleton and Terhi Tolvanen  /  Karren Dale and Gemma Draper  /  Kelly McDonald and Kirsten Haydon  /  Lisa Higgins and Cal Lane  /  Kathryn Yeats and Ben Pearce  /  Raewyn Walsh and Henriette Schuster  /  Renee Bevan and Harrell Fletcher  /  Sarah Walker Holt and Helen Britton  / Soo Jeong Lee and Natalia Milosz-Piekarska  /  Suni Hermon and Sally Marsland  /  Tineke Jansen and Ela Bauer  /  Vanessa Arthur and David Neale

Sarah Walker-Holt - Time Parallel Necklace  Sarah Walker-Holt - Time Parallel Necklace

Rebecca Yeats Necklace Rebecca Yeats Necklace
61 – 69 Abel Smith St, Te Aro,
Wellington 6012 – NZ
tel +64 4-385 1929

25/02/2014

EXPO ‘WUNDERRUMA’ – Galerie Handwerk, Munich (DE) – 7 Mars-17 Avril 2014

SCHMUCK 2014 – Munich – 12-18 Mars 2014

WUNDERRUMA - Jewelry from New-Zealand

Bijoux de Nouvelle-Zélande
Ausstellungseröffnung : Donnerstag, 6. März 2014, 18.30 Uhr
Katalogpräsentation  mit Karl Fritsch und Warwick Freeman Freitag, 14. März 2014, 11 Uhr

WUNDERRUMA - schmuck-  7 mars au 17 avril 2014 Bijoux de Nouvelle-Zélande Galerie Handwerk  (Peter Madden)

 

exhibitors : Brian Adam — Billy Apple — Fran Allison — Georg Beer — Rachel Bell — Pauline Bern — Renee BevanBecky Bliss — Kobi Bosshard — Trevor Byron — Hamish Campbell — Jacqui Chan — Fran Carter — Chris Charteris — Octavia Cook — Ann Culy — Mary Curtis — Karren Dale — Andrea Daly — Cath Dearsley — Peter Deckers — Gillian Deery — Jane Dodd — John Edgar — Ilse-Marie Erl — Ruth Evans — Sharon Fitness — Warwick FreemanKarl Fritsch – Elena Gee — Suni Gibson — Caroline Griffin — Jason Hall –  Niki Hastings-McFall — Louisa Humphry — Sinead Jury — Lynn Kelly — Richard Killeen — Rangi Kipa — Owen Mapp — Kelly McDonald — Peter McKay — Craig McIntosh –Matthew McIntyre-Wilson — Peter Madden — Ross Malcom — Doug Marsden — Paul Mason — Roy Mason — Bob Mitchell — Neke Moa — Kate Newby — Stephen Mulqueen — Shelley Norton — Kelly O’Shea — Michael Parekowhai — Amelia Pascoe — Alan Preston — Stanley E. Rea — Sarah Read — Donn Salt — Moniek Schrijer –  Joe Sheehan — Frances Stachl — Inia Taylor — Rob Upritchard — Francis Upritchard — Emily Valentine — Tobias Vodanovich — Lisa WalkerSarah Walker-HoltRaewyn Walsh — Camille Walton — Rohan Wealleans — Areta Wilkinson — Jess Winchcombe

EXPO WUNDERRUMA - Louisa HumphryLouisa Humphry
Alain Preston
Alan Preston White Foreshore Fragment Pin, Shell fragment, Silver
Frances StachlFrances Stachl
Emily ValentineEmily Valentine
Ross MalcolmRoss Malcom

Jane DoddJane Dodd

EXPO WUNDERRUMA - Chris CharterisChris Charteris
EXPO WUNDERRUMA - Lisa WalkerLisa Walker
EXPO WUNDERRUMA - Ross MalcolmRoss Malcolm
EXPO WUNDERRUMA - Bob Mitchell Bob Mitchell
 Shelley NortonShelley Norton – bracelet – plastic

 

Galerie Handwerk
Max-Joseph-Straße 4
Eingang Ecke Ottostraße
80333 München
Tel. +49 (0)89 511 92 40
wolfgang.loesche@hwk-muenchen.de
hwk-muenchen.de/galerie

 

08/01/2014

COUP de COEUR : Tineke JANSEN

Classé dans : COUP DE COEUR,Nlle Zelande (NZ),Tineke JANSEN (NZ) — bijoucontemporain @ 16:01

Tineke JANSEN

« I am a Contemporary Jeweller from New Zealand. My work is dream inspired fantasy with elements taken from nature.
I am in my fourth year of study, I also work part time tutoring jewellery techniques and practical skills »

« My work primarily focuses on form and placement on the body. I enjoy the play on contrasts within my work. By using industrial materials to create an organic flow and femininity of form from a male dominated resource I arouse the curiosities and give my jewellery a touch of playfulness. »
2012 Necklace's -Tineke Maree Jansen (Auckland)  - "Chain reaction"Tineke Maree Jansen (Auckland)  – 2012 Necklace’s – « Chain reaction »
2012 Necklace's -Tineke Maree Jansen (Auckland) - felted balls- "My work primarily focuses on form and placement on the body. I enjoy the play on contrasts within my work. By using industrial materials to create an organic flow and femininity of form from a male dominated resource I arouse the curiosities and give my jewellery a touch of playfulness."   https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.439971462716830.98238.284122084968436&type=3Tineke Maree Jansen (Auckland) – 2012 Necklace’s – felted balls
2012 Necklace's -Tineke Maree Jansen (Auckland) - untitled - rubber ringTineke Maree Jansen (Auckland) – 2012 Necklace’s – untitled – rubber ring
2012 Necklace's -Tineke Maree Jansen (Auckland)   https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.439971462716830.98238.284122084968436&type=3Tineke Maree Jansen (Auckland)   – 2012 Necklace
My Beautiful Nightmare1 -  by Tineke Jansen - 2012Tineke Jansen - « My Beautiful Nightmare 1″ –   2012
« My wok is conceptually focused on the freedom of Surrealism, exploring dreams and awakening the subconscious. ….. For most people fairy stories are a primary-coloured world of beautiful people facing dastardly villains and overcoming insurmountable obstacles on their path to a life full of happiness, a world where good always triumphs…..« 
2012 Necklace's -Tineke Maree Jansen (Auckland)  - "clustered"Tineke Maree Jansen – 2012 Necklace  « clustered »
Tineke Jansen 2012 - chain reactionTineke Jansen 2012 – chain reaction
Tineke Jansen 2012Tineke Jansen 2012 – rubber rings
You can find (buy …) her work here, at the Lopdell House Gallery (NZ)
(in the curiosity-cabinet)

29/06/2013

EXPO ‘HANDSHAKE’ – Objectspace, Ponsonby, Auckland (New Zealand) – 15 Juin-20 Juill. 2013

Classé dans : Exposition/Exhibition,GALERIES,Nlle Zelande (NZ),www Klimt02 — bijoucontemporain @ 23:38

HANDSHAKE project 


HANDSHAKE project - Becky Bliss, Fabrizio Tridenti, Neke Moa, Karl Fritsch, Gillian Deery, Estela Sáez Vilanova, Sam Kelly, Octavia Cook, Jhana Millers, Suska Mackert, Jessica Winchcombe, Warwick Freeman, Nadene Carr, Lucy Sarneel, Sarah Read, Iris Eichenberg, Lynsay Raine, Andrea Wagner, Kristin D’Agostino, Judy Darragh, Debbie Adamson, Hanna Hedman, Sharon Fitness, Lisa Walker  -  Objectspace (Ponsonby, Auckland, New Zealand)  15-Jun-2013 - 20-Jul-2013  www.objectspace.org.nz

The Handshake exhibition is the culmination of the Handshake mentoring project that began in 2011 involving twelve, then emerging, New Zealand-based jewellers. The project initiated by jeweller, teacher, and jewellery activist Peter Deckers, has provided the mentees with the opportunity to work with an internationally renowned artist or jeweller of their choice, as a mentor.
The role of the mentor was to assist the mentee with establishing an ongoing practice that would extend beyond the duration of the project and provide professional support and advice during the process of them developing works for a series of Handshake exhibitions staged in Australia, New Zealand and Germany. While earlier exhibitions  focussed on the mentees, the Handshake exhibition at Objectspace presents works by all the participants and highlights the collaborative process and unique qualities of the relationships between the pairs.
The Handshake website (http://handshakejewellery.com) records the progress of the Handshake participants via blogs that chart the development and exchange of ideas which occurred through a mixture of email, Skype, and studio visits. A recently published book HANDSHAKE – 12 contemporary jewellers meet their hero collects text and images from participants and features an essay from leading international jewellery commentator Benjamin Lignel. The book is available for purchase at Objectspace.
In the final phase of this Handshake project each of the current mentees has been given the opportunity to select a new recent graduate, whom they will mentor for of a year,expanding on the ever increasing circle of learning and contributing to the dynamic flow of shared experiences. These graduating mentees- soon- to- be- mentors are the most valuable jewellery resources generated by Handshake.

participants : 
Becky Bliss / Fabrizio Tridenti
Neke Moa / Karl Fritsch
Gillian Deery / Estela Sáez Vilanova
Sam Kelly / Octavia Cook
Jhana Millers / Suska Mackert
Jessica Winchcombe / Warwick Freeman
Nadene Carr / Lucy Sarneel
Sarah Read / Iris Eichenberg
Lynsay Raine / Andrea Wagner
Kristin D’Agostino / Judy Darragh
Debbie Adamson / Hanna Hedman
Sharon Fitness / Lisa Walker

 

 

Objectspace   
8 Ponsonby Rd | Ponsonby
Auckland | New Zealand
P +64 9 376 6216
F +64 9 376 6246
info@objectspace.org.nz
www.objectspace.org.nz

06/03/2013

Schmuck 2013 – EXPO ‘Classic of the Modern : Warwick Freeman’ – Munich (DE)

Klassiker der Schmuck 2013
Warwick Freeman , New Zeland
Each year at this special exhibition one designer is honoured in a retrospective called « Classic of the Modern ». This time it´s the turn of New Zealand designer Warwick Freeman. His pieces are characterised by a reduced, very clear idiom and a particular reference to natural forms.

« Warwick Freeman makes jewellery that has an air of distilled simplicity, a considered response to the imagery and aesthetic of our collective culture, jewellery that speaks about the complexities of living in Aotearoa New Zealand. » (The Arts FoundationWarwick Freeman biography available too)

(for pictures « in blue », Thanks to Fingers gallery)

Warwick Freeman - Blue Face  lapis 2011Warwick Freeman – Blue Face  lapis 2011

Warwick Freeman - Black Rod and Blue Tube - lapis, argilliteWarwick Freeman – Black Rod and Blue Tube – lapis, argillite

Warwick Freeman, lapis lazuli ball ringWarwick Freeman, lapis lazuli ball ring

Shell Carving by Warwick Freeman, 2004, pearl shell, lacquer, oxidised silver, 120 x 56mm. Shell Carving by Warwick Freeman, 2004, pearl shell, lacquer, oxidise

Warwick Freeman, Big Silver Necklace, 1982    forged fine silver and horsehairWarwick Freeman, Big Silver Necklace, 1982    forged fine silver and horsehair

Warwick Freeman, Tiki Face, 1992, jasper, greenstone, oxidised silver, goldWarwick Freeman, Tiki Face, 1992, jasper, greenstone, oxidised silver, gold

 

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