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27/04/2015

EXPO ‘Stonecutting’ – Gallery Velvet da Vinci, San Francisco (USA) – 1er-31 Mai 2015

 San Francisco’s VELVET DA VINCI is proud to present Stonecutting, an exhibition of work by New Zealand artists Craig McIntosh + Joe Sheehan
Opening reception with the artists will take place on Friday, May 1, from 6-8 pm.

 StoneCutting - Velvet da Vinci

 

Craig McIntosh’s most recent series of brooches are hand carved and fabricated from Pakohe (argillite), a material rich with metaphor for New Zealand’s cultural and natural landscape. A highly indurated sedimentary rock, hardened through intense compression and heat, Pakohe is often described as “basement rock,” as it literally represents the material New Zealand is built from and upon. Calling to mind visions of topographical maps and aerial nature photographs, McIntosh’s process channels the aesthetic and symbolic implications of his material, resulting in fractured, layered, and laminated compositions. According to the artist:
“The brooches… are abstract forms arrived at through the making process, and the associations with landscape and boundary are the result of thinking through making. When I’m working with stone I take the perspective that I am in some way are some way working with land, or can be seen as working with place, or even working possibly with here…. Landscape is a human construct, it is the way we see and interpret the physical environment. The division and breaking up of land into the idea of a system of human made spaces has shaped our environment. So for me it is therefore critical, when using stone in a contemporary jewelry context to have an understanding of both identity and boundary, jewelry can not be made concerning anything else until this is considered.”
McIntosh earned a Bachelors of Visual Arts and Masters Degree from the Dunedin School for Art. His works have exhibited in Japan, New Zealand, and Germany. Highlighted shows include WUNDERRUMA, a touring exhibition that debuted at the 2014 Schmuck conference. The artist presently lives and works in Dunedin.

Craig McIntosh, Pakohe Brooch 004, 2015, Carved Pakohe (Argillite), 1.85 x .25 x 2.15″Craig McIntosh, Pakohe Brooch 004, 2015, Carved Pakohe (Argillite), 1.85 x .25 x 2.15″

Craig McIntosh, Pakohe Brooch 006, 2015, Carved Pakohe (Argillite), 2.15 x .25 x 2.15″Craig McIntosh, Pakohe Brooch 006, 2015, Carved Pakohe (Argillite), 2.15 x .25 x 2.15″

Craig McIntosh, Pakohe Brooch 0011, 2015, Carved Pakohe (Argillite), 1.65 x .35 x 2.80″Craig McIntosh, Pakohe Brooch 0011, 2015, Carved Pakohe (Argillite), 1.65 x .35 x 2.80″

Craig McIntosh, Pakohe Brooch 003, 2015, Carved Pakohe (Argillite), 3.65 x .25 x 2″Craig McIntosh, Pakohe Brooch 003, 2015, Carved Pakohe (Argillite), 3.65 x .25 x 2″

Joe Sheehan’s series The Quick and the Dead is a collection of remote controls meticulously carved from stone.   Presented as artifacts in the style of classic typological museum display, the work takes the form of whole units and broken pieces, calling to mind futuristic archaeological documentations of contemporary culture. Arranged by similarity and type, the series poses questions about contemporary methods in museum studies, addressing notions of preservation and historiography from a global perspective. Working with New Zealand native stones such as greywacke, basalt, and argillite, Sheehan shines a light on the heavy historic symbolism of each material from a South Pacific cultural context, referencing prominent museum collections of Toki: stone adzes made by Maori and other Polynesian cultures.

Joe Sheehan, The Quick and the Dead (Group 5), Greywacke, basalt, argillite, Sizes vary. Photo Credit: Kallan MacLeod.Joe Sheehan, The Quick and the Dead (Group 5), Greywacke, basalt, argillite, Sizes vary. Photo Credit: Kallan MacLeod.

Joe Sheehan, The Quick and the Dead (Group 4), Carved basalt, Sizes vary. Photo Credit: Kallan MacLeod.Joe Sheehan, The Quick and the Dead (Group 4), Carved basalt, Sizes vary. Photo Credit: Kallan MacLeod. 
Velvet da Vinci
2015 Polk Street,
San Francisco, CA 94109
Phone: 415-441-0109
Email:  info@velvetdavincigallery.com
Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11am – 6pm, Sunday, 11am – 4pm.

 

17/04/2015

EXPO ‘Forgotten Stones / Vergessene Steine’ – Eva Maisch’s Gallery, Würzburg (DE) – 18 Avril-23 Mai 2015

Forgotten Stones – Art Jewelry Exhibition at Eva Maisch’s Gallery

neue Ausstellung « Vergessene Steine » wird am Samstag, den 18. April eröffnet.

 Eva Maisch gallery

Wir präsentieren Arbeiten von  Adam & Stoffel, Michael Becker, Rudolf Bott, Petr Dvorak, Annette Ehinger, Dominique Labordery, Deborah Rudolph, Nils Schmalenbach und Pia Sommerlad.

Lustrous and colorful, hard and imperishable: stones have piqued people’s interest since the early days of human history, when hunters and gatherers, our early ancestors, interpreted them as gifts from the gods and attributed healing and protective powers to them – and used them as jewelry. Over the course of cultural history, people have changed their notions and interpretations of them. Precious stones appeared in legends and fairy tales, and were incorporated in the crowns of aristocrats and the jewelry of wealthy citizens. They became status symbols, an economic factor and the subject of scientific research. In our day and age, precious stones continue to play an important role as jewelry elements or investments. In contrast to conventional gem-studded jewelry, which features gemstones in classical cuts and arranged in repetitive patterns, contemporary jewelry artists are using their own individual techniques to restore the magic of gemstones.

Deborah Rudolph, Halsschmuck, JaspisDeborah Rudolph, Halsschmuck, Jaspis

Claudia Adam & Jörg Stoffel, necklace. AgateClaudia Adam & Jörg Stoffel, necklace. Agate

Michael Becker, bangle, 2010. 750 gold, dolomite, 18 × 2,8 cmMichael Becker, bangle, 2010. 750 gold, dolomite, 18 × 2,8 cm

Some of the Forgotten Stones showcased at Eva Maisch’s gallery radiate an almost weightless aura, others display a heavy, solid quality, and others again surprise the beholder with unusually imaginative cuts or their natural crystal structure. They stimulate our senses with finely engraved textures or imposing cuboidal shapes. Combined with matte gold, blackened silver or stainless steel, or spotlighted without any setting at all, they provide impressive reifications of creative freedom and individuality. With her current exhibition, the Würzburg-based gallerist and goldsmith provides insights into the work of eminent designers. They developed their individual styles while studying at art academies and universities, and have been honored with many international awards. At 7:30 p.m. on April 28 and 29, 2015, there will also be a concert with the singer and songwriter Hubert Treml (ArtAurea)

Petr Dvorak, earrings. AgatePetr Dvorak, earrings. Agate

Nils Schmalenbach seems unable to conceive jewelry without photography  Nils Schmalenbach seems unable to conceive jewelry without photography- Brosche, Achat

 

Annette Ehinger – boucles d’oreilles 2012 or 585, tourmaline rose, quartz enfuméAnnette Ehinger – earrings 2012 or 585, tourmaline rose, quartz enfumé 

 

Eva Maisch Schmuck
Sterngasse 5
97070 Würzburg
Germany
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27/02/2015

EXPO ‘Tarja Tuupanen: Marbles’ – Gallery Four, Göteborg (SE) – 27 Fevr.- 4 Avril 2015

Tarja Tuupanen : marbles

Opening: Friday Febuary 27th 17.00-21.00 

Lecture: Thursday February 26th, 16.00, HDK Kristinelundsgatan 6-8
The exhibition runs until April 4th

Tarja Tuupanen Necklace: Untitled, 2014 Ready-made marble tableware, velour sticker, steelwire stonepart 10 x 6 x 4-5 cm; length of the necklace: Photo: Lassi RinnoTarja Tuupanen Necklace: Untitled, 2014 Ready-made marble tableware, velour sticker, steelwire stonepart 10 x 6 x 4-5 cm; length of the necklace- Photo: Lassi Rinno

Tarja Tuupanen is a master of stone. Out of agate, granite, marble and quartz she brings out shapes that reveals the raw soul of the stone and tells its history. The work is a sensitive investigation and her love for the material is unmistakable.
The material has always been a raw block of stone, but recently Tuupanen has started to use ready-made marble tableware; a tacky candleholder or saltshaker from the 80s. Industrially made object triggers the creative process. The most interesting things in these stones are man made instead being natural; green stickers, tool marks, stains, wax. The tableware has been used and it has a history of its own with cultural references.
Tuupanen lives and works in Lappeenranta Finland. She has graduated as MFA in 2013 from Konstfack, University College of Arts, Crafts and Design, Stockholm, Sweden. Tuupanen has exhibited internationally since 1998, the last solo exhibition was in 2012 in Gallery Ida, Tallinn, Estonia. She has been the chairwoman of Finnish Art Jewellery Association between 2005-2012.

Tarja Tuupanen Necklace from 2014 - marble  Tarja Tuupanen Necklaces from 2014 – marble

Tarja Tuupanen  - Brooch - ready made marble tableware, brassTarja Tuupanen  – Brooch – ready made marble tableware, brass

Broche en marbre de Tarja TuupanenBroche en marbre de Tarja Tuupanen

Tarja Tuupanen Necklace from 2014 - marble  Tarja Tuupanen  Necklace: Untitled, 2014 – Ready-made marble tableware, velour sticker, steelwire
stonepart 11 x 6,5 x 6,5-3,5 cm; length of the nec – Photo: Lassi Rinno

Tarja Tuupanen Necklace: Notions of skill, 2013 Ready-made marble tableware, velour sticker, steelwire stonepart: 9 x 8,5 x 6,5 cm; length of the necklac Photo: Lassi Rinno.Tarja Tuupanen Necklace: Notions of skill, 2013 Ready-made marble tableware, velour sticker, steelwire stonepart - length of the necklace 9 x 8,5 x 6,5 cm;  Photo: Lassi Rinno.

Tarja Tuupanen Brooch: Notions of skill, 2013 Ready made marble tableware, brass 16 x 6 x 1 cm Photo: Lassi RinnoTarja Tuupanen Brooch: Notions of skill, 2013 Ready made marble tableware, brass 16 x 6 x 1 cm Photo: Lassi Rinno

Tarja Tuupanen Brooch: Notions of skill, 2013 Ready made marble tableware, brass 16 x 6 x 1 cm Photo: Lassi RinnoTarja Tuupanen Brooch: Notions of skill, 2013

Nordhemsgatan 74,
Göteborg (Sweden)
+46 73 086 42 49

 

22/02/2015

COUP de COEUR at SCHMUCK 2015 : Katharina DETTAR – ROCK on …..

Katharina DETTAR, selected for SCHMUCK 2015.

2013 : University of Applied Sciences Trier, Jewellery and Stonework Design in Idar-Oberstein (DE)
2014 : BKV-prize / Finalist

Forcément, avec sa formation à Fachhochschule Trier, Idar-Oberstein,  elle nous taille dans la pierre des bijoux à couper le souffle ….

 

"papallona" - Katharina Dettar - brooch - labradorite - papallona exhibition ( BUTTERFLIES at AmarantoJoies, Barcelona, exhibition )Katharina Dettar  « papallona » brooch – labradorite – papallona exhibition ( BUTTERFLIES at AmarantoJoies, Barcelona, exhibition )

KATHARINA DETTAR-DE Inhorgenta/Graduates BA 2013KATHARINA DETTAR- « Leave the scene behind » – agate, silver and steel wire – 250|400|30 mm – photo by Manuel Ocaña – Inhorgenta – Graduates BA 2013

KATHARINA DETTARKATHARINA DETTAR- « Leave the scene behind » -  agate, silver and steel wire 250|400|30 mm  - photo by Manuel Ocaña

KATHARINA DETTAR Agate, wood, gold, silver, steelKATHARINA DETTAR « Summer is gone » neckpiece – Agate, wood, gold, silver, steel (back of the neckpiece)

Katharina Dettar, Summer is gone, 2013, Necklace, Agate, wood, gold, silver, steelKatharina Dettar, Summer is gone, 2013, Necklace, Agate, wood, gold, silver, steel (front of the neckpiece)

Katharina Dettar, Germany-SpainKatharina Dettar « leave the scene behind » neckpiece 2010

 

07/12/2014

Coup de coeur : Julia Maria Künnap – une beauté qui COULE de source …

Classé dans : COUP DE COEUR,Estonie (EE),Julia Maria KUNNAP (EE),pierre / stone — bijoucontemporain @ 0:07

MELTING beauty ………………

Julia Maria Künnap graduated in 2004 from the Estonian Academy of Arts, Jewellery Art Department under Prof Kadri Mälk. Before this she studied at Konstfack, Stockholm and in 2006 was the Artist in Residence at Alchimia School of Contemporary Jewellery in Florence. She has exhibited in various group exhibitions throughout Europe and in 2013 presented her first solo exhibition in the Emerging Artist Platform at Sienna Patti.

Julia Maria Künnap, Is This The Happiness, 2012, brooch, smokey quartz, gold, 35 x 35 x 20 mm, photo: artistJulia Maria Künnap, Is This The Happiness, 2012, brooch, smokey quartz, gold, 35 x 35 x 20 mm, photo: artist

“..I usually don’t regard the equipment used for accomplishing my works as important enough to talk about separately, but questions that have arisen in connection with those fusible stones show that an explanation is needed. A dealer from Munich was convinced that I’m approaching the issue in a post-modernist fashion: I purchase a cut stone and melt it down by the corners – “the melting point of quartz is said to be quite low!” That is, for better or worse, impossible. There are no hat tricks, bamboozling or conjuring in making my work. All of the stones are cut from one piece of raw material without any glue or resin.
Working with this material in this way was as if I was stepping across some invisible doorstep. I had been told, stone cutting is an “entire science in itself” that demands “extremely great skills and experience”, as well as “very expensive equipment”. Additionally, I had a certain awe for a rare natural material such as large gemstone crystals – I didn’t want to grind them aimlessly into dust. Luckily, my art-academy education encouraged me: I nonetheless started searching for solutions to execute my idea, not for accommodating it or pouring it into a more simply- and quickly-workable material.
I derive from classic cuts when constructing my own, but I redo them according to my own style. I’ve used a step cut in the case of many stones: it is an older type of cut, which gives the stone a calmer and more static reflection, and it doesn’t shine in such a crazy way. The “Nobody’s Perfect” ametrine is cut using Standard Round Brilliant in principle, but I made it 9-fold instead of the usual 8-fold mirror-image symmetry – while something akin to a notched 8-pointed cross makes up (below) half of a standard brilliant pavilion, this stone’s design has nine branches.
My faceting workshop is located in my kitchen sink. The machine, with which I cut these stones fits onto an A4-size sheet of paper and costs less than the average Estonian’s holiday trip to a warm, sunny destination. I’ve gradually rebuilt and improved the machine according to my needs: for a faceted cut, it has a faceting head, with which I can hold the stone at the correct angle. For the most part, I cut the facet part first, and then cover the entire polished area with sealing wax for safety and carve end polish the flowing forms.
It’s quite pointless to talk about the amount of time spent working the stones. Raw crystal can be observed for a week or two, a couple of years, or a dozen before cutting. After the work is complete, there is always the feeling that it could have been done better; but I suppose that is merely the blink of an eye in comparison with the age of the stone itself.”

 Julia Maria Künnap, Molten, brooch, 2010, Smokey Quartz, gold, 3 x 3.5 x 2.5 cm, private collection in ItalyJulia Maria Künnap, Molten, brooch, 2010, Smokey Quartz, gold, 3 x 3.5 x 2.5 cm, private collection in Italy

I am inspired by imperfection. It is a strong source of motivation. If I see a perfect thing—an artwork, a poem—I just breathe in and breathe out. It just comes and then goes. But if I see something that irritates me, I start analyzing. Why am I irritated? Why isn’t it perfect? Where is the ‘mistake’ made? Usually, once I have deconstructed the whole piece in my mind, I already have so many good ideas. In the end, these ideas don’t have much to do with the source of inspiration. (Sienna Patti)

Julia Maria Kunnap, Regret, brooch– obsidian, gold – at Art gallery Putti "Endless closeness" exhibitionJulia Maria Kunnap, « Regret » brooch– obsidian, gold at Art gallery Putti « Endless closeness » exhibition

read her INTERVIEW on AJF by Aaron Decker (dec. 2012) :
« Can you comment on the juxtaposition of the facets with the parts that appear melted or in liquid form?
Julia Maria Künnap: There is a large contrast in many ways. The stones cannot melt like this. The drop could not freeze like this. Even if you could melt quartz, it would be so wrong. Gems just don’t melt. Glass does. It is trying to capture a moment in something so eternal as stone. »

Julia Maria Künnap - A Half At Every Angle, (brooch), 2014. Rock crystal, gold, 2 1/2 x 1 3/4 x 3/4Julia Maria Künnap – « A Half At Every Angle » brooch, 2014. Rock crystal, gold, 7.6 × 3.1 × 1.3 cm

JULIA MARIA KÜNNAP-EE,  brooch "From the Middle of a Dream", 2010, obsidian, gold, 50 x 20 x 10 mmJulia Maria Künnap - brooch « From the Middle of a Dream », 2010, obsidian, gold, 50 x 20 x 10 mm

Julia Maria Künnap -  it-starts-rai-ning earringsJulia Maria Künnap -  it-starts-rai-ning earrings

Julia Maria Künnap -   "Nubis" brooch 2011Julia Maria Künnap – « Nubis » brooch 2011 – obsidian, gold, 6.5 x 5 x 1 cm, photo: Ulvi Tiit, Collection of Estonian Museum of Applied Arts and Design, Tallinn, Estonia

 

08/11/2014

Decouverte : Elvira Golombosi & her « GUARDIANS »

Elvira Golombosi (MFA student at Idar Oberstein) – exhibited at « nsaio 5 – Neuer Schmuck aus Idar-Oberstein » 05 – 09 November 2014 -

Her recent work, « GUARDIANS », series of rings-objects carved in stone

….. and she is selected for TALENTE 2015 !

[Talente-Award presentation 2015 : 14 March 2015  16:30, Halle B1 Main stage of IHM (Internationalen Handwerksmesse Munich)]

Elvira Golombosi  - rose quartz, obsidian, falcon’s eye 7x7cm - rings 2014 - "GUARDIANS"  *My recent work -- Series of rings-objects carved in stoneElvira Golombosi  - rose quartz, obsidian, falcon’s eye 7x7cm – rings 2014 – « GUARDIANS »

Elvira Golombosi • Ring "Guardian" • Rose quartz, falcon's eye and obsidian • 2014 • ©p Nahe-ZeitungElvira Golombosi • Ring « Guardian » • Rose quartz, falcon’s eye and obsidian • 2014 • ©p Nahe-Zeitung

Elvira Golombosi -   obsidian, smoky quartz, falcon’s eye, onyx 11 x 4cmElvira Golombosi -   obsidian, smoky quartz, falcon’s eye, onyx 11 x 4cm

Elvira Golombosi -  carneol 6 x 7 cmElvira Golombosi -  carneol 6 x 7 cm

Elvira Golombosi - Ring Lapis Lazuli, 12x6cmElvira Golombosi – Ring Lapis Lazuli, 12x6cm

 

 

05/11/2014

EXPO ‘nsaio 5 – Neuer Schmuck aus Idar-Oberstein’ – Mobile Galerie Aurum, Frankfurt (DE) – 5-9 Nov. 2014

nsaio 5 – Neuer Schmuck aus Idar-Oberstein presented by mobile galerie aurum
05 – 09 November 2014
Opening: 4 November 2014, 7 pm
 

nsaio5 - The new jewellery from Idar-Oberstein

(Stephie Morawetz necklace)

The exhibition includes a selection of semester projects and final projects of the bachelor and master programs. It will be exhibited jewelery and gemstone work. Students at the University of Trier on campus Idar-Oberstein embark on the search for their place and their role as jewelry makers in today’s society. Because of the location Idar-Oberstein, a world trade center for gems, the use of the material gem is of particular importance.In addition, the experimental approach with other materials is explicitly promoted, since the development of a personal artistic expression is a priority objective of the studies.
For the exhibition a publication is published that now offers the opportunity to read statements from students, in particular relating to Gemstone. This topic gives the department of gemstone and jewelry design a unique position. We see this position represented by more than 20 nationalities, that are united by the group of students in Idar-Oberstein. For the team of the departement, it is a extreme pleasure to be working with such cultural diversity and to determine on a daily basis, how young people, for example from Korea and China, Israel and Iran, Pakistan and Russia are mutually supportive and work collaboratively on the issue of gemstone and jewelry design.

Typhaine Le Monnier NSAIO5Typhaine Le Monnier Gummi rubber necklace

Eduardo Tarin NSAIO 5Eduardo Tarin – brooch « Antipoda 9″ copper

Alejandra Solar (MFA 2014) • Brooch "Aire Negro" • Onyx, silver and photo transfer • 2014 • p© catalogue "New jewellery from Idar-Oberstein 5“Alejandra Solar (MFA 2014) • Brooch « Aire Negro » • Onyx, silver and photo transfer • 2014 • p© catalogue « New jewellery from Idar-Oberstein 5“

 NSAIO 5 Elvira Golombosi – (MFA stud.) • Ring « Guards » • Onyx, smoky quartz, obsidian and falcon´s eye • 2014 • p© catalogue « New jewellery from Idar-Oberstein 5“

Cristina Martí Mató (MFA 2014) • Necklace "The Nest" • Copper and garnet • 2014 • p© catalogue "New jewellery from Idar-Oberstein 5“Cristina Martí Mató (MFA 2014) • Necklace « The Nest » • Copper and garnet • 2014 • p© catalogue « New jewellery from Idar-Oberstein 5“

Anna Jacobs (MFA stud.) • Necklace "Versteck" • Stone and cotton • 2014 • p© catalogue "New jewellery from Idar-Oberstein 5“Anna Jacobs (MFA stud.) • Necklace « Versteck » • Stone and cotton • 2014 • p© catalogue « New jewellery from Idar-Oberstein 5“

Petr Dvorak (MFA stud.) • Necklace "Achat Collier" • Agate, steel and titanium • 2014  www.dvorakart.comPetr Dvorak (MFA stud.) • Necklace « Achat Collier » • Agate, steel and titanium • 2014

Petr Dvorak (MFA stud.) • Necklace "Achat Collier" • Agate, steel and titanium • 2014  Petr Dvorak (MFA stud.) • Necklace « Achat Collier » • Agate, steel and titanium • 2014

Working with stones
Pornrudee Boonyapan (Thailand), M.F.A. 3rd sem. Stone lives for itself and people try to use it according to their needs. But stone is stone.
Katja Köditz (Germany), M.F.A. 2nd sem. In Idar-Oberstein stones are bound fast together with the history of the town and its inhabitants. For me, dealing with the social questions and phenomena of our time and visualising these with jewellery and using stones also means me devoting myself to Idar-Oberstein’s identity.
Petr Dvorak (Czech Republic), M.F.A. 4th sem. Stone is a part of jewellery. Jewellery without stone is almost unthinkable. Stone is jewellery. Stone is something beautiful, the only colour we have from the earth. A stone is beautiful in itself, but you give it a shape, which wasn’t there before. The question is, whether this is beautiful. That depends on the beholder and is usually only recognised a century later.
Stephie Morawetz (Austria), M.F.A. 1st sem. I find stones really beautiful, but I can’t find a way in. Perhaps because they exist in the present and my pieces in the future. It is difficult to create a connection between the material I work with and the stone. They live in two different universes, in two different times. Maybe that will change when I colour my stones myself, through a procedure that is no longer natural.

NSAIO 5 - collier Stephanie Morawetzcollier Stephanie Morawetz

On the significance of gemstones and jewellery in art
The debate, well known within our field, about whether the creation of gemstones and jewellery should be classed as craft, design or art has significantly contributed, in the context of the Bologna Process, to raising the profile of our department. Answering this central question of professional identity is the focus of current research within our field and department. Reconsidering the assignment of gemstones and jewellery as it is interpreted and understood today steers us to an ever-clearer position, which defines itself, amongst other means, by examining its relationships with neighbouring fields;
– The creation of gemstones and jewellery is not a craft. Although there is an intersection with the crafts’ central tenet of specialst craftsmanship, the contemporary focus differs.
–  The creation of gemstones and jewellery is not design. Although there is an intersection with design’s central tenet of fashionable aestheticization and the successful marketing of this, the contemporary focus differs.
–  The creation of gemstones and jewellery is not liberal art. Although there is a certain intersection with the liberal arts’ central tenet of “existing outside of oneself”, the contemporary focus differs.
Establishing this position is not intended to draw or sharpen demarcation lines, but to rethink the identity of jewellery creators within a wider context than the pre-existing criteria of other specialties, which are insufficient for our field.

 

mobile galerie aurum
Ausstellungshalle 1A
Schulstraße 1a
Frankfurt am Main
www.galerie-aurum.de
www.ausstellungshalle.info

galerie aurum
Kristina Balzer
Tel 0177 491 42 53
email: info@galerie-aurum.de
www.galerie-aurum.de

 catalogue :

NSAIO 5 catalogue

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

nsaio 5: The new catalogue « New jewellery from Idar-Oberstein 5“ shows works in stone, jewellery and photography together with written statements on the subject of working with gemstones, from students of the Trier University of Applied Sciences Department of Gemstones and Jewellery in Idar-Oberstein.

 

15/03/2014

mineralART 2014 “between layers – worlds within agate” – and the WINNERS are ….

EXPO ‘MineralART 2014 – Between Layers’ – Staatlichen Antikensammlungen, Munich (DE) – 13 Mars- 11 Mai 2014

during  SCHMUCK 2014 – Munich – 12-18 Mars 2014

“Between layers – worlds within agate”

The prize-giving will take place on Thursday, 13 March 2014, as part of a celebratory event inside the Munich State Collection of Antiques. The competition-winning pieces and other outstanding works will be on display here during SCHMUCK 2014 and until 11 May 2014 during museum opening hours.

Flyer mineralART

Award ceremony & opening: Thursday, 13th March 2014, 7:00 pm
State Collection of Antiques, Königsplatz, Munich.

 mineralART 2014 is proud to present the work of following artists in Munich :

Claudia Adam — Penka Arabova-Pasheva — Paula Bahadian — Frans Beelen — Tereza Borlova –
Carolin Denter — Katharina DettarPatrícia DominguesMatthias DyerTanja Emmert – Elvira Golombosi — Lina Goltsios — Elena Gorbunova — Taehee In — Levani Jishkariani — Christina Karababa – Yeonkyung Kim — Beate Klockmann — Karina Lazauskaitė — Typhaine Le Monnier — Tianqi Li –  Cristina Martí Mató –  Judy McCaigViktoria Münzker – Tom Munsteiner — Julia Obermaier — Ruudt Peters — Hester Popma-van de Kolk — Sari Räthel — Philip Sajet — Nils Schmalenbach — Kvetoslava Flora Sekanova –  Giovanni Sicuro — Supavee Sirinkraporn — Jörg Stoffel — Karen Vanmol — Karol Weisslechner — Zindzi Wijminga — Getter Ziugand   ………..

An overwhelming number of 275 pieces by 161 participants ………………

mineralART 2014 | "between layers – worlds within agate"| Some impressions of the judges' meetingThe final discussion - will it be four or five honorable mentions...?;)Jury Members: Jiro Kamata, Helena Lehtinen, Estela Saez Vilanova, Gerhard Schmidt and Dr. Marjan Unger The jury final discussion – will it be four or five honorable mentions… ?  
Jury Members: Jiro Kamata, Helena Lehtinen, Estela Saez Vilanova, Gerhard Schmidt and Dr. Marjan Unger

and the WINNERS are :

 

Giovanni Sicuro, Italy1st Prize Series of rings:  „Bianchi Untitled 1-3“, Agate, gold"Giovanni Sicuro, Italy 1st Prize Series of rings:  „Bianchi Untitled 1-3“, Agate, gold
« The effect of the rings fascinated the Jury; at first glance they are classic pieces of jewellery but the material used irritates the observer, awaking curiosity. The simple, white agate does not look like stone but rather like ivory or plastic. Only when touched is the cool, hardness of stone revealed and on closer inspection the concept of the pieces is exposed. A traditional ring is reversed here; the entire body of the ring is cut from a layer of white agate concealing the gold band. The stone is not reduced to being a decorative accessory but forms the defining element, which through exceptional craftsmanship replicates ‘traditional’ ring stones. This subtle play with the expectations of traditional ring design and with the notion of agate as a stone which is valued for its pattern or colour, won over the Jury unanimously. »
Levani Jishkariani, Georgia 2nd Prize Object: Wood, agate  Levani Jishkariani, Georgia 2nd Prize Object: Wood, agate 
« This object, made from wood and agate sticks, impressed the jury with its archaic expression. Its effect is earthy, as if it came from the distant past but at the same time it is very contemporary. The piece works on completely different levels, awakens associations and memories, from a piece of agricultural equipment to an instrument of torture, depending on the viewer’s experiences. This multidimensionality earned it second place from the jury.« 
Typhaine Le  Monnier, France3rd PrizeNecklace: Agate, elastic band Typhaine Le  Monnier, France 3rd Prize Necklace: Agate, elastic band
« The unusual combination of materials in this necklace delighted the jury. The elastic band is reminiscent of a brassiere strap; a very feminine element, which however remains mostly unseen, hidden. Through its use in a classic neck adornment, the hidden is placed centre-stage, drawing the observer’s gaze upon itself. The soft material enters into a fascinating combination with the hard, cold stone exacerbated by the positioning of the supple band, designed for proximity to the body, on the outside and the distal stone next to the body. Through the choice of materials, the colour and the form of the agate the piece relates strongly to the body. The jury particularly highlighted the haptic quality of the jewellery; when worn the cool weight of the agate is felt on the neck but the stone nevertheless fits itself to the body and is very wearable. Beyond its function as a necklace, the jury explicitly commended the effect of the piece as an object »

31/10/2013

EXPO ‘GeMANOgy: Gem as Storyteller’ – MANO Contemporary Jewellery & Object, Taipei City 106 (Taiwan, R.O.C.) – 28 Sept.-3 Nov. 2013

Classé dans : Exposition/Exhibition,GALERIES,pierre / stone,Taiwan (RC),www Klimt02 — bijoucontemporain @ 0:17

GeMANOgy: Gem as Storyteller -

MANO Contemporary Jewellery & Object (Taipei City 106, Taiwan)

“GeMANOgy” aims at showing how the contemporary jewellers express the word/ material « Stone » in various and contemporary way. Set aside the traditional value for gemstones defined in Gemology, MANO would like to offer the viewer a different angle to read the stories behind these jewellery.

« How the most precious thing about stones in a jewellery box is not always their rarity, their size or their perfection. It is their stories. » by Victoria Finlay, author of ‘Jewels: A Secret History’.

Since the word “Jewellery” for most Taiwanese public still relates a lot to precious material, faceted gemstones, jade jewelleries, beaded bracelet, etc., we would like to present the jewelleries with diverse and contemporary interpretation of the theme “stone” in search of that real preciousness. Each artist gives their unique point of view: to bring out the social-psychological side of the material, to discuss about the collective thoughts on material, technique, and artistry, or to question the real meaning of value.

DM-web1合

Artists:   Gieh-Wen Lin –  Karl Fritsch –  Katja Prins –  Nelli Tanner –  Philip Sajet –  Shu-Lin Wu –  Tarja Tuupanen

Gien-Wen Lin, Necklace, 2012Gien-Wen Lin, Necklace, Diamond is not the point 2012 – Silver, crystal

Philip Sajet, Ring, Philip Sajet – Ring: Straal verticaal – Yellow gold, white gold

Philip Sajet_1-webPhilip Sajet – Ring

Karl Fritsch, Ring, 2012Karl Fritsch, Ring, 2012  Silver, steel, cubic zirconia

Shu-Lin Wu, Ring, 2013Shu-Lin Wu – Ring: Hiver#1 2013 – Silver, porcelain, white chalcedony, rubber

Tarja Tuupanen, Brooch, 2013Tarja Tuupanen – Brooch : Untitled 2013 – Ready-made marble tableware, brass

 
 
MANO Contemporary Jewellery & Object
No.4, Ln. 16, Taishun St
Da’an Dist. – Taipei City 106
Taiwan, R.O.C.
Telephone: +886 2 2365 2519
website: www.manomanman.com
mail: info@manomanman.com

11/07/2013

EXPO ‘Romancing the Stone’ – Pieces of Eight Gallery , Melbourne (AU) – 9 juill.-17 Aout 2013

« Tessa Blazey: Romancing the Stone » - Pieces of Eight Gallery (Melbourne, Australia)

"Tessa Blazey: Romancing the Stone" - Pieces of Eight Gallery (Melbourne, Australia) 09-Jul-2013 - 17-Aug-2013 website: www.piecesofeight.com.au

‘Romancing the Stone’ is an exhibition exploring Melbourne jeweller Tessa Blazey’s ongoing love affair with minerals and gemstones. As she explains, “I am continually captivated by the exquisite geometry of mineral specimens. When I look at these crystalline forms I experience a shift in scale. Like Alice, I am transported down the rabbit hole into their miniature world. I imagine myself immersed in a diamondiferous landscape glinting beauty”.

In this exhibition Blazey explores the geometric structures and landscapes of crystal and mineral specimens through mimicry and transformation. Utilizing raw curiously cut and mounted stones she frames each piece to mimic the stone that inspired it. To individualise each piece within the context of its miniature wonderland, Blazey has personified each piece by naming them after an iconic heroine.

 Tessa Blazey Ring: Luna 18ct white gold, 0.57ct Ceylon blue sapphireTessa Blazey Ring: Luna 18ct white gold, 0.57ct Ceylon blue sapphire

Tessa Blazey Earrings: Uhura 9ct yellow gold, oxidised sterling silver, cast fluorite
 Tessa Blazey Earrings: Uhura 9ct yellow gold, oxidised sterling silver, cast fluorite
Tessa Blazey
Tessa Blazey ‘Nyx’ Ring: 18ct yellow gold, trilliant cut parti coloured sapphire

Tessa Blazey Ring: Lady Godiva 18ct yellow gold, 1.58ct rough octahedral diamond (right)

Tessa Blazey Ring: Lady Godiva 18ct yellow gold, 1.58ct rough octahedral diamond (right)

 

Pieces of Eight Gallery
28 Russell Place
VIC 3000 – Melbourne
Australia
Telephone: +613 9497 8121

website: www.piecesofeight.com.au

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