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02/09/2015

EXPO ‘Jo Pond: Intimate’ – Gallery Velvet da Vinci, San Francisco (USA) – 19 Aout-20 Sept. 2015

Jo Pond: Intimate
An exhibition of new works by the UK based artist

Artist’s Reception:  Friday August 21, 6-8pm

Intimate - Jo Pond - Velvet da Vinci

 

Jo Pond’s most recent jewelry works can be seen as reincarnated objects, relics of everyday urban life that have been transformed by the artist’s process. Material elements such as buttons, coins, cans, and keys are modified and reinterpreted, simultaneously creating new narratives for each piece while drawing from each object’s industrial heritage and unique past. Precious metals and stones such as diamonds or pearls are often included in combination with these found objects, playing with visual and conceptual notions around beauty and the mundane, social status, and hierarchical value or worth.

Born in Chiswick, London, Pond currently lives and works in rural Staffordshire. Her work has exhibited on an international level; highlights include exhibits at Schmuck (Munich), the V&A Museum, (London), the Price Tower Arts Centre (Oklahoma), and Contemporary Applied Arts (London). Pond’s Narrative Jewelry Collection received the 2005 BDI Industry & Genius Awards in the category of Products and Genius. The artist earned her Masters at The School of Jewellery, Birmingham and is a member of Contemporary Applied Arts, London.  She presently serves as a full-time lecturer at the School of Jewelery in addition to maintaining her studio practice.

 Jo Pond, Fine Quality (Brooch), Repurposed steel tin, steel, iron, diary pencilJo Pond, Fine Quality (Brooch), Repurposed steel tin, steel, iron, diary pencil

Jo Pond, Intimate tin locket, Repurposed steel tin, repurposed bone page turner, silver, gold plate, ribbonJo Pond, Intimate tin locket, Repurposed steel tin, repurposed bone page turner, silver, gold plate, ribbon

 Jo Pond, Baking Tin and Grater Series, Repurposed baking tin, citrine, 18ct Gold, Steel.Jo Pond, Baking Tin and Grater Series, Repurposed baking tin, citrine, 18ct Gold, Steel.

Jo Pond, Phillumeny neckpiece, Suspended in Pink Series, 1940’s baking tin, match sticks  Jo Pond, Phillumeny neckpiece, Suspended in Pink Series, 1940’s baking tin, match sticks 

Jo Pond, Planted Frame Brooch, Repurposed steel tin, steel, silver, gold plateJo Pond, Planted Frame Brooch, Repurposed steel tin, steel, silver, gold plate

Statement from the Artist:
“Using found objects is like starting the process of creating with part of the story already written. I am able to choreograph, make introductions and interventions. I may add and remove lines within the story and then watch to see if they read true to me, sometimes living with them in one form or another, still, watching and listening for them to tell me when they are comfortable and appropriate. I have a bond with each stage, a personal connection, one of belonging, a reluctance to let go or and an uncomfortable enjoyment of that which I have choreographed. Saving these intimate moments by capturing them safely in photographs, I am able to intervene once again, in the knowledge that I can recall that grouping and the essence of relationship it brings. My compositions work more happily in groups, sometimes the harmony of material, color or repetition compels the creation of a family, a void being left once one conclusion is made and moved to one side to free space for further meanderings. The conclusions are the quietest moments, following a multitude of compositional conversations it is necessary to listen to the outcomes to know if they are complete. There is a sense of separation at this point, the umbilical cord becomes severed and some of the tension seeps away, leaving me comforted in my decision making process.
There are phases, maybe somewhat fickle, where I have a changing passion for that which I find. Sometimes time, location or circumstance can influence these phases, but they mark a point of change and must be consciously considered. It is all part of being true to the visual conversation being orchestrated, alongside the voluntary and involuntary narratives, which serve to conduct my metaphor.”  Jo Pond, 2015

 Jo Pond, Small Necessities, Silver, repurposed bone toothbrush, 18ct gold, gold plate  - DETAIL: Jo Pond, Small Necessities, Silver, repurposed bone toothbrush, 18ct gold, gold plate  – DETAIL 

 

Velvet da Vinci
2015 Polk Street,
San Francisco, CA 94109
Phone: 415-441-0109
Email:  info@velvetdavincigallery.com
Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11am – 6pm, Sunday, 11am – 4pm

 

 

26/06/2015

DECOUVERTE ….. Monica Cecchi, recup’ in red

Monica Cecchi

  »My studio is like a child’s playroom where everything is permitted but under the rule of my game. I almost always start with very free sketches trying to keep the lightness and spontaneity of the gesture on paper. During the planning and the execution I do not exclude any possibilities of changing my plan that the randomness or other events can suggest to me. I try to consider what is happening and choose what interests me at the that moment. I think it is a game played on the unconscious memory because my intention is to loose a certain kind of control in my creative phase losing the intent of reason to arrive at something that I have known but, at the same time, surprises me.
I try to reach a result that amazes me while I can recognize as something familiar, like when, during the day you notice something that reminds us of a dream the night before that you were not able to recall with an effort of will. I work both in field of jewelry and in sculpture probably because both of these two disciplines have a base of technical progress that is able to keep my ego and my opinion busy, until the end of the job.
One of the materials that I love are the old thin cans; I like their graphics because represent a certain type of history of society of the last century where the packaging was non junk it was reusable. These containers remind me of my childhood, of grandmother who preserved these boxes of cookies where they kept wires and button or other tools that they consider valuable. I am a passionate collector and, at the same time, a destroyer of these objects that have had a particular symbolism for me ranging from the protection and coercion, but at the same time, can be used as a palette for a painter and still possess a charm which doesn’t seek an explanation.
I really like using the old material, which has the signs of aging or has cracks that suggest their story without revealing it completely. Generally I join these objects, unique for and valuable for their history, with the material prized for its commercial value because it seems to me that this contrast is interesting and that between these two types of material a relationship and tension is born because their difference. »

Monica Cecchi  Necklace: Geometrie intorno al centro 2010  Tin, ironMonica Cecchi  Necklace: Geometrie intorno al centro 2010  Tin, iron

Monica Cecchi Ring: La cosa che ho perso, 2015 Recycled tin 5 x 3 x 1.5 cmMonica Cecchi Ring: La cosa che ho perso, 2015 Recycled tin 5 x 3 x 1.5 cm

Monica Cecchi Necklace: Legami di sangue, 2015 Recycled tin ø 20 cmMonica Cecchi Necklace: Legami di sangue, 2015 Recycled tin ø 20 cm

Monica Cecchi Necklace: Legami di sangue, 2015 Recycled tin ø 20 cm Detail viewMonica Cecchi Necklace: Legami di sangue, 2015 Recycled tin ø 20 cm Detail

Monica Cecchi Necklace: Corrispondenza, 2014 Recycled tin ø 25 cmMonica Cecchi Necklace: Corrispondenza, 2014 Recycled tin ø 25 cm

Monica Cecchi - Sculpture/Brooch: Lei 2009 Tin10 x 11 x 8 cm & 11 x 10 cm Monica Cecchi – Sculpture/Brooch: Lei 2009 Tin10 x 11 x 8 cm & 11 x 10 cm

Peperepe by Monica Cecchi  - Alchimia 2015Monica Cecchi  « Peperepe »  (Alchimia 2015)

Monica Cecchi - at Alternatives gallery Monica Cecchi - at Alternatives gallery

24/06/2015

IL FAUT SAUVER LE ….. LA …. “uncommon jewelry for independent women”

Classé dans : COUP DE COEUR,metal,recup' / recycled,Roxy LENTZ (US),USA — bijoucontemporain @ 23:21

Non non non, vous n’y êtes pas ! on n’est pas « au cinéma ce soir » avec « Il faut sauver le soldat Ryan »,  MAIS plutôt il faut « sauver » la créatrice de bijoux Roxy Lentz ! ;-)

Effectivement elle vient de m’écrire « Where I live none of the jewelry we both love would sell, none. So, when I try to go for that, I never know if I am going on the right path. …… I am ready to stop making jewelry to please the midwest taste …. »
NOOOOOOOOOOOOOOO !!!!!

J’avais déjà remarqué, et donc aimé, certains de ses bijoux sur mon « board » Pinterest « ROUGH, RUDE & SAUVAGE … jewelry » mais en voici plus … rien qu’en son honneur !

She calls her jewelry  uncommon jewelry for independent women…..

  Roxy Lentz - Copper, pexi glass, steel.Roxy Lentz – necklace – Copper, pexi glass, steel.

« Re purposed metal with a new mission. My jewelry is fabricated from recycled metals I find at thrift shops; I occasionally will use purchased metal, but prefer the patina of metal that has a history. Silver plate trays once given as wedding gifts, stored and then abandoned are crafted into one of a kind pieces that will bring attention to the wearer every time they are worn.  In 2010 I received a grant from the Italian Cultural Institute of Louisville, KY to go to Florence, Italy and take a two week course of intensive study in the fabrication of studio art jewelry, at the world known Alchimia Contemporary Jewellry School. Jewelry resulting from this study is in the “Firenze Collection”.  I show my one-of-a-kind jewelry at selected art shows, and in several galleries across the US. (for example, « Ferrous », held at Velvet da Vinci in San Francisco CA. 2013)  » Roxy Lentz

Roxy Lentz | 3 brooches made from repurposed metals, largest 6”Roxy Lentz - 3 brooches made from repurposed metals, largest 6”

Roxy Lentz - Bangle from re purposed silver plated trays, copper wire, fire patina.Roxy Lentz – Bangle from re purposed silver plated trays, copper wire, fire patina

Necklaces - Roxy Lentz Jewelry - Steel wire, brass.Roxy Lentz – Necklace – Steel wire, brass

Roxy Lentz   - Brooch - Silver plate tray, fire patina, steel. Photo by artist.Brooches - Roxy Lentz Jewelry - Silver plate tray, fire patina, steel. Photo by artist. (BACK)

Roxy Lentz   – Brooch (front & back) – Silver plate tray, fire patina, steel. Photo by artist

Roxy Lentz -  Necklace of recycled metal, PVC pipe. Discarted show, Ojai CA.Roxy Lentz -  Necklace of recycled metal, PVC pipe

 Roxy Lentz -  "I found it on the ground" - broochRoxy Lentz -  « I found it on the ground » – Brooch, plexi-glass, nickel silver, brass, steel.
The pexi-glass is from a fabric store sign that was blown down during a hurricane. Hurricane Ike took a side trip to the mid-west. NFS – More brooches may be made in this material and style.   about 3″ long.

« I found it on the ground«  The materials used for this jewelry have a past, and memories that go back to the beginning of time. Elements fused together and became metal, the metal was refined and fabricated into beautiful silver plated trays given as gifts for a new marriage, to someone who earned a bit of recognition, or just because. 
Then the memories change and are passed on to someone else, and the old memories are refashioned into new ones. 
A walk along a beach or river, will often find bits and pieces of burnt wood, things once recognizable and useful, now cast aside. Memories of a campfire, love, friendship, and good food. 
This collection is about the memories that fill our lives, we share, put away, then burn into our consciousness for safekeeping.
 Roxy Lentz -  "I found it on the ground" - Cuff/bangle of repurposed silver plate tray with fire patina. Riveted to found pexi-glass with frosted finish. About 5 inches across Roxy Lentz -  « I found it on the ground » – Cuff/bangle of repurposed silver plate tray with fire patina. Riveted to found pexi-glass with frosted finish. About 5 inches across

Roxy lentz - The wild child, it can be just about anything. Will it catch on peoples clothes? yes, if they wear a loose weave. But, some people love it, and wouldn't have it any other way.Roxy Lentz - « The wild child » cuff, it can be just about anything. Will it catch on peoples clothes? yes, if they wear a loose weave. But, some people love it, and wouldn’t have it any other way -
I LOVE it !!

20/05/2015

EXPO ‘DESECHOS PRECIOSOS’ – Universidad Gestalt de Diseño, Xalapa, México – 3-12 Juin 2015

Mariana Acosta : Los espero! DESECHOS PRECIOSOS, una muestra de 19 de los mejores proyectos de mi clase de Joyería Contemporánea Sustentable .

Inauguracion Junio 03 2015 / 6-8pm. Lobby de la Universidad Gestalt de Diseño.

I am pleased to share with you the opening of PRECIOUS WASTE. A collection of 19 sustainable contemporary jewerly neck pieces from my class at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño.

June 3rd / 6PM in Xalapa, México.

Mariana Acosta -  · Los espero! DESECHOS PRECIOSOS, una muestra de 19 de los mejores proyectos de mi clase de Joyería Contemporánea Sustentable . Junio 03 2015 / 6-8pm. Lobby de la Universidad Gestalt de Diseño.  I am pleased to share with you the opening of PRECIOUS WASTE. A collection of 19 sustainable contemporary jewerly neck pieces from my class at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño. June 3rd / 6PM in Xalapa, México.

I am very proud to share with you the launch of PRECIOUS WASTE an Online Exhibition containing all of my class projects. The physical exhibition will held a selection of 19 pieces from my teaching at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño but there are close to a 100 pieces that need to be seen and shared with the world!
Please help me share ! – Mariana Acosta

http://desechospreciosos.wix.com/macosta

Mariana Acosta - Precious wasteMiguel Rodriguez – spring 2013 – collar hecho de tetrapack

Mariana Acosta  - my class at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño.Mariana Acosta -  from my class at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño.

2013-2015. Five years ago I had to abandon my dream of staying in the US after graduating from my MFA, just like many other international art students and friends who had to leave during 2008 recession. Only the though ones remained, gloriously if I may say, they honor the opportunity they were given every day. What to do with a degree that is barely know in México – contemporary jewelry – often mistaken for traditional designers jewelry?

Well, I decided to teach. It’s been four years since I started this life project, and I call it that because for me, informing the new generations about contemporary jewelry is a life mission. I work with waste materials. Why? Because they were all I had left as working materials after graduating from a very prestigious but also pricey school. So I decided to make lemonade with the lemons I had, or as I named my toilet paper cardboard rolls jewelry series « When Life Gives you Shit, Use it as Fertilizer « . As a result, three years later, I am gathering the outcome of this project with a physical & virtual exhibition. Thank you everyone who has handed me an opportunity to make this happen. Special thanks to Universidad Gestalt de Diseño in Xalapa, Ver. Mx for fostering an opportunity for contemporary jewelry to flourish in México.

 

FOR THE OTHER (FANTASTIC) JEWELS, see my post here : Sustainable jewelry at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa (Mexico): BREATHTAKING !!

 

 
Universidad Gestalt de Diseño

Av. 1o de Mayo No. 113.
Xalapa. Veracruz, México.
tel (228) 8 15 63 92informes@ugd.edu.mx
http://www.ugd.edu.mx/

03/05/2015

Sustainable jewelry at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa (Mexico): BREATHTAKING !!

Classé dans : ECOLE / SCHOOLS,Mariana ACOSTA (Mx.),Mexique (MX),recup' / recycled — bijoucontemporain @ 0:09
Mariana Acosta  professor at sustainable jewelry class of Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa, Mexico  :
« Aug_Jan_2014/15 : This is my students work. The class goal was to make a piece of contemporary jewelry from waste materials that are considered useless outside the creative realm. A dialogue between the maker and the material is enabled through a process of profound research and experimentation. Understanding the possibilities of the material to be transformed into an out of the ordinary body ornament was central to the success of the work. I feel very proud that some of them were able to develop their own personal exchange with the material« 
Alfredo Quesada - alumno at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa Alfredo Quesada – alumno at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa
Can you guess the material from which this piece was made? Have you seen how Styrofoam sheets are made?
/ El material del que esta hecha esta pieza es increíble. Han visto como están hechas las láminas de unicel? De bolitas!Carla Sánchez - alumna at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño XalapaCarla Sánchez – 2014 – alumna at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa
This beauty is thoroughly made from egg cartons. / Esta hermosura esta hecha meticulosamente con cartón de huevo.
Fernando Benítez - alumno at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño XalapaFernando Benítez - alumno at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa
In México, brands of snacks like chips usually have this « tazos » inside their chip bags as a collectable item for years now. They usually depict cartoon characters. My student created this amazing piece which interestingly shines like it was made of precious stones due to the holographic prints in them. / Esta pieza esta hecha de « tazos » que por su naturaleza holográfica brillan como si fueran piedras preciosas.
Sarai Hernández - alumno at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño XalapaSarai Hernández – alumno at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa – 2014
Celebrating graphic design day with gorgeous sustainable contemporary jewelry pieces & crit!
/ celebrando el día del diseño gráfico con una entrega de mi clase de joyería contemporánea sustentable! –
cassette tape material
Alberto Martínez - alumno at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño XalapaAlberto Martínez – alumno at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa
- 2014 – Material: Glass / reused light bulbs – Photo © Mariana Acosta Contreras
María Crivelli  - alumno at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño XalapaMaría Crivelli  - alumna at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa
- 2013 – Material: Tetrapack – photo © Emannuel Xolalpa
José Antonio Nill - alumno at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño XalapaJosé Antonio Nill - alumno at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa
- 2013 – Material: Paper / Magazine – Photo © Emannuel Xolalpa
 Susana Utrera - alumno at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa Susana Utrera - alumno at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa
- 2013 – Material: Paper / newspaper – Photo © Emannuel Xolalpa
Marta Dawe - alumno at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño XalapaMarta Dawe - alumno at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa
- 2013 – Material: Paper / magazines – Photo © Emannuel Xolalpa
Luz Ma. Campos - alumno at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño XalapaLuz Ma. Campos – alumno at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa
- 2013 – Material: Paper / bus tickets – Photo © Emannuel Xolalpa
Alejandra Castillo Morales - alumna at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa - Pet Bottles / reused - Photo © Mariana Acosta ContrerasAlejandra Castillo Morales – alumna at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa – Pet Bottles / reused – Photo © Mariana Acosta Contreras
Alejandra Castillo Morales - alumna at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa - Pet Bottles / reused - Photo © Mariana Acosta ContrerasAlejandra Castillo Morales – alumna at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa – Pet Bottles / reused – Photo © Mariana Acosta Contreras
Carlos Antonio Flores Ledesma - alumna at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa - Pet Bottles / reused - Photo © Mariana Acosta ContrerasCarlos Antonio Flores Ledesma – alumno at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa – Pet Bottles / reused – Photo © Mariana Acosta Contreras
 Ariana Torres - alumna at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa -  Cassette Tape - Photo © Mariana Acosta ContrerasAriana Torres – alumna at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa -  Cassette Tape – Photo © Mariana Acosta Contreras
Carlos Antonio Flores Ledesma - alumna at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa - Pet Bottles / reused - Photo © Mariana Acosta ContrerasCarlos Antonio Flores Ledesma – alumno at Universidad Gestalt de Diseño Xalapa – Pet Bottles / reused – Photo © Mariana Acosta Contreras

01/02/2015

selected for SCHMUCK 2015 : Karen Vanmol

Classé dans : Belgique (BE),bois / wood,Karen VANMOL (BE),recup' / recycled,SCHMUCK (DE) — bijoucontemporain @ 12:41

Karen Vanmol

« Karen Vanmol finds a city without nature claustrophobic, but nature with no sign of humanity is too quiet. She uses her tools trying out how materials reacts to them.  »

« As in my earlier work, I find my inspiration in architecture and nature. Except that everything continues to evolve and change. A city without a little nature works claustrophobic for me, but a nature landscape with no sign of humanity is too quiet for me. Protecting or imitating nature, the use of natural materials in architecture, the restoring of a road surface, accidental strong shapes on a construction site, these things I find very interesting. 
On my way through town, I hunt and collect. I always encounter interesting images that I use as an inspiration. In addition, there is a certain choice of materials and colors, these are strongly influenced by memories. For example the necklaces, furniture in different colors, certain constructions. I make my story and the viewer projects its own story on top of mine.
  I always start from my sources of inspiration, with these eyes I look around me. I show viewers how I look at things around me. Next to that I make jewellery and I like to use my tools and try out how materials reacts to them. Eventually I work with materials, and that provides an additional factor. I find out the properties they possess and how I can edit them and this will count in the final result. Some techniques I use are common and you can find them in your house. 
Naturally I tend to work clean and delineated, here I try against it by for example damaging materials. It gets me out of my comfort zone and it bothers me, but at the same time I want to do it. » Karen Vanmol page at Klimt02

Karen Vanmol -   Brooch 'Cultivate' 2014Karen Vanmol -   Brooch ‘Cultivate’ 2014

Karen Vanmol - "Cultivate"  Brooch: wood, fiber reinforced plastics, brass, steel, 2013 .Karen Vanmol - « Cultivate »  Brooch: wood, fiber reinforced plastics, brass, steel, 2013 .

Karen Vanmol  Wood, formica, veneer, silver, steel pin  Brooch, 2012Karen Vanmol -  brooch back & front – Wood, formica, veneer, silver, steel pin   2012

Karen Vanmol, Cultivate Necklace 2, 2014, wood, laminate, plastic, vintage beads, brass, spray-paint, 110 x 270 x 20 mm, photo: artistKaren Vanmol, « Cultivate » Necklace 2, 2014, wood, laminate, plastic, vintage beads, brass, spray-paint, 110 x 270 x 20 mm, photo: artist

 Karen Vanmol "Evolving Habitat"  Karen Vanmol « Evolving Habitat »  Necklace 2012 Wood, fiber reinforced plastics, veneer, oxidized silver, vintage plastic beads Pendant: 8 x 11 x 1 cm chain: 44 cm

karenvanmol.com - "cultivate" collection - brooch 2013Karen Vanmol - « cultivate » collection – brooch 2013

Karen Vanmol Rings: Under construction 2010 Wood, concrete, paint, cotton, silver 2.5 cm x 4 cm x 3.5 cmKaren Vanmol Rings: Under construction 2010 Wood, concrete, paint, cotton, silver 2.5 cm x 4 cm x 3.5 cm

karenvanmol.com - under construction collectionKaren Vanmol - « Under construction » collection

11/01/2014

EXPO ‘DETRITUS’ – Houston Center for Contemporary Craft, Houston,TX (US) – 15 Nov. 2013 – 26 Janv. 2014

Detritus

Houston Center for Contemporary Craft (HCCC) is pleased to present Detritus, on view November 15, 2013 – January 26, 2014, in the Artist Hall. With material investigation as the foundation of their practices, artists Kat Cole, Laritza Garcia, Tara Locklear and Chesley Williams have constructed objects of adornment that employ found elements, remnants of industrial products, and other alternative non-precious materials that carry meaning and hint at a purpose. By observing their environments and taking up the practice of collecting, these artists have created inspiring jewelry and headwear that contain a gritty richness reminiscent of urban and industrial landscapes. Incorporating detritus and evidence of human inhabitance, the works possess an artifact-like quality that not only presents a reinterpretation and re-contextualization of ubiquitous materials but also allows the viewer to consider what the source materials reveal about contemporary society.

EXPO Detritus http://www.crafthouston.org/exhibitions/current-exhibitions/( Kat Cole, “Box Bracelet,” 2010. Tin, copper)

In line with the concept-driven field of contemporary jewelry, in which the use of materials, skills and compositions are applied to explore ideas, Kat Cole’s work and methodology are a means for her to actualize a connection to her surroundings. Cole has lived in eight different states over the past 10 years, adjusting to and appreciating the diverse natural, industrial, and cultural landscapes of each location. Through the examination of architecture, industrial structures, and their inherent histories, along with scouting for objects to incorporate into her jewelry, she actively seeks out personal and tangible ways to link each art object to its place of origin.

Detritus exhibition - Kat Cole, Assemblage X Necklace, 2013. Found objects, brass, sterling silver, steel. Photo by Kat Cole.Kat Cole, Assemblage X Necklace, 2013. Found objects, brass, sterling silver, steel. Photo by Kat Cole.

Raised in the South Texas Border region, where the influence of a vibrant Mexican culture is pervasive, jeweler Laritza Garcia’s work is inspired by her attraction to the physical presence of color in the world around her. The brilliant oranges, blues and pinks that cover facades of buildings in this locale are palpable in her expressive color pallet. With a desire to convert two-dimensional graphics into wearable configurations, Garcia begins her process by creating loose gestural illustrations from inks and calligraphy brushes.  From there, she layers bold colors and graphic lines evocative of street art and graffiti and, with an understanding of the mood-elevating effects of color, she creates jewelry to bring a sense of whimsy to the landscape of the body.

 Laritza Garcia, “Roundabout Necklace,” 2013. Steel, copper, brass, powder coat. Photo by Laritza Garcia.Laritza Garcia, “Roundabout Necklace,” 2013. Steel, copper, brass, powder coat. Photo by Laritza Garcia.

Asking her viewers to reevaluate their conventional notions of preciousness and value, Tara Locklear incorporates everyday materials, such as wood, concrete, and glass, into her jewelry.  She also repurposes fragments of skateboard decks in some of her pieces. The incorporation of this unique material was inspired by a community of friends with a reverence for the urban sport and a desire to give the decks, laced with sentimental value, new life. The colors and graphics of the boards spark a vision of a skateboarder’s utopia, a concrete jungle filled with vivid and eye-catching graphics. Locklear’s exploration of traditional jewelry forms and her affinity for costume jewelry of the 1940s and ‘50s serve as inspiration for the visual format used to illustrate her concepts.

Tara Locklear, “Concrete Costume Cluster Necklace 1,” 2011. Cement, steel, faux gold leaf. Photo by Tara Locklear.Tara Locklear, “Concrete Costume Cluster Necklace 1,” 2011. Cement, steel, faux gold leaf. Photo by Tara Locklear.

 Tara Locklear, “Iconic Interpretation Brooch,” 2012. Cement, reclaimed glass, sterling silver, faux gold leaf. Photo by Tara Locklear. (DETRITUS)Tara Locklear, “Iconic Interpretation Brooch,” 2012. Cement, reclaimed glass, sterling silver, faux gold leaf. Photo by Tara Locklear.

Tara Locklear, “Drop Deck Studded Bangle,” 2012. Recycled skateboards, sterling silver, brass, pigment. Photo by Tara Locklear (exhib. DETRITUS)Tara Locklear, “Drop Deck Studded Bangle,” 2012. Recycled skateboards, sterling silver, brass, pigment. Photo by Tara Locklear

 

Tara Locklear, “Unbridled Royalty Necklace,” 2011. Cement, reclaimed glass, sterling silver. Photo by Tara Locklear.Tara Locklear, “Unbridled Royalty Necklace,” 2011. Cement, reclaimed glass, sterling silver. Photo by Tara Locklear.

The accumulation and transformation of mundane objects is a fundamental component of Chesley Williams’ artistic practice of creating innovative headwear. With the D. I. Y. (Do-It-Yourself) social movement and high fashion as inspiration, Williams creates works of art that push the boundaries of traditional design with her use of materials and techniques. Her process begins with the accumulation of materials—from donations, recycling centers and thrift stores—which are then transformed into raw materials through deconstruction. Clustering, grouping and building with these materials, she creates sculptural forms that serve as bold and beautiful reminders of the layers of daily waste generated within urban environments. By including fragments of consumer products (for example, headphones, used for structural support) and incorporating traditional textile methods of weaving, stringing, tying, stitching, and wrapping, Williams’ avant-garde head adornments present a highly imaginative approach to recyclingChesley Williams, “Untitled,” 2013.  Zippers, electrical tape, foam flex, nickel plated split rings, metal u-locks, and deconstructed headphones. Photo by Meghan Nicole. (DETRITUS)Chesley Williams, “Untitled,” 2013.  Zippers, electrical tape, foam flex, nickel plated split rings, metal u-locks, and deconstructed headphones. Photo by Meghan Nicole.

Detritus was curated by Ashley Powell, Curatorial Assistant at Houston Center for Contemporary Craft.

 

 

Houston Center for Contemporary Craft
4848 Main Street,
Houston, TX 77002
Phone: 713.529.4848
Fax: 713.529.1288

Ne pas jeter le GANT …..

« Jeter le gant » : Par allusion à la coutume des anciens chevaliers qui jetaient leur gant ou gantelet, par manière de défi, à ceux contre qui ils voulaient combattre – Défier quelqu’un au combat.  [throw down the gauntlet] (wiktionary)

 

Xiaorui Zhang- Dyed rubber gloves, 14ct plated gold. (showed by flexible wearability)Xiaorui Zhang- Dyed rubber gloves, 14ct plated gold.  collection « rubber chains » 2010
« I have chosen rubber gloves as my material, aiming to transform a mundane everyday item into beautiful and original objects. I have explored unique dyeing techniques on my material to bring a special colour result« 
Xiaorui Zhang - rubber gloves jewelryXiaorui Zhang – rubber gloves jewelry
Xiaorui Zhang necklaces
Xiaorui Zhang necklaces
Xiaorui Zhang necklaces - made with rubber glovesXiaorui Zhang necklaces – made with dyed rubber gloves
Xiaorui Zhang -  rubber gloves  necklaces yellow 1Xiaorui Zhang -  rubber gloves  necklaces yellow – collection « rubber chains »
Xiaorui Zhang -  rubber gloves - 2010 - green necklaceXiaorui Zhang -  rubber gloves – 2010 – green necklace
Xiaorui Zhang - red necklace - made with rubber glovesXiaorui Zhang – red necklace – made with rubber gloves
Camilla Prasch, - Handschuhkette Gummi neckpiece, rubber glovesCamilla Prasch – Handschuhkette Gummi neckpiece, rubber gloves
Camilla Prasch (DK) Rubber Glove NecklaceCamilla Prasch (DK) Rubber Glove Necklace
Lucilla Giovanninetti Necklace: Clasp!, 1996 Cotton 106 x 10 x 3 cmLucilla Giovanninetti Necklace: Clasp!, 1996 Cotton 106 x 10 x 3 cm
Niki Stylianou  necklace 2013  - made with rubber glovesNiki Stylianou  necklace 2013  – made with rubber gloves
Niki Stylianou black necklace - detail  - made with rubber glovesNiki Stylianou black necklace (presented at JOYA 2013) – back detail  – made with rubber gloves
Niki Stylianou brooch  - made with rubber gloves
Niki Stylianou brooch 2013 – made with rubber gloves
Min-ji cho - jewellery from rubber glovesMin-ji Cho – jewellery from rubber gloves
Bracciali di Min-Ji ChoMin-Ji Cho bracelet – rubber gloves a pearls – 2007
La collezione più bella rimane quella del 2007, quando Min-ji Cho si è fatta conoscere con gioielli realizzati con argento/perle e soprattutto guanti di gomma (quelli per pulire la cucina o il bagno), ritagliati in moda da creare degli originali pizzi. Difficile da credere vedendo il risultato, ma dal dettaglio si vede in modo chiaro. Recentemente ha presentato dei nuovi bracciali, ma non vedendone traccia non resta che parlare dei guanti…Min-Ji Cho earrings 2007
Min-Ji Cho brooch - 2007 - rubber gloves & pearlsMin-Ji Cho brooch – 2007 – The Gloves’ Dream – Rubber gloves, sterling silver, freshwater pearls, 18ct gold
crazily creative - min-ji cho's jewellery made from rubber glovesMin-Ji Cho bracelet
Min-Ji Cho Rubber Gloves BroochMin-Ji Cho Rubber Gloves Brooch
in BOOK 'Showcase 500 necklaces' (juill 2013) - Elida Kemelma 'hands' 2012 leather gloves Elida Kemelman ‘hands’ 2012 leather gloves (in BOOKShowcase 500 necklaces‘ (juill 2013))
gabrielle desmarais -    Les mains de Madeleine  Collier/Necklace  Rubber gloves,thread  (crédit photo: Joannie Lafrenière)Gabrielle Desmarais –  » Les mains de Madeleine »  Collier/Necklace  Rubber gloves, thread  (crédit photo: Joannie Lafrenière)
Margherita Marchioni necklace made from household cleaning (rubber) gloves.Margherita Marchioni necklace made from household cleaning (rubber) gloves.

05/11/2013

EXPO ‘TEMA PENDIENTE’ – CCEBA, Buenos Aires (Argentina) – 5-18 nov 2013

Pending Issue / Tema pendiente CCEBA, Centro Cultural de España en Buenos Aires

Exhibition of contemporary jewelry with recicled materials
TEMA PENDIENTE - CCEBA 5-18 nov 2013 http://issuu.com/temapendiente/docs/catalogo
Exponen:
Silvia Abrevaya — Alejandra Agusti — Gabriela Ahumada — Mirta Allutto — Florencia Alonso — Hebe Argentieri — Alicia Atencio — Iacov Azubel — Sara Elizabeth Bari — Gaby Bonelli — Mónica Borgogni — Paula Botto — María Camicha — Nora Capitman — Maria Carelli — Jorge Castañón — Anne Luz Castellanos — Nora Castillo — Mercedes Castro Corbat — Daniela Comaleras — María Celina De Lorenzi — Graciela Di Monaco — Graciela Fassi — Marina Fatta — Nélida Ferrari Lázar — Mirta Figueroa — Sol Flores — Fabiana Gadano — Patricia Gallucci — Paula Giecco — Martha Gigena — Liliana Ginocchio — Déborah Glinberg — Maria Fernanda Gomez — Elisa Gulminelli — Cecilia Hecker — Marcia Helman — Alicia Hidalgo — Claudia Rosana Jofman — Wanda Juarros — Elida Kemelman — Mirta Kraves — Alejandra Kunz — Liliana Labarta — Vanesa Lamadrid — Eleonora Lanne — Laura Leyt — Liliana Macklin — Magela Maggi — Marta Mallar Sirkis — Susana Mandelbaum — Patricia Mastaller — María Mendieta — Gabriela Miguel — María Rosa Mongelli — Cecilia Mórtola — Facundo Narduzzi — Iona Nieva — Gabriela Nirino — Silvia Ogasso — Claudia Olivieri — Dolores Oneto — Susana Ortiz — Alejandra Oyón — Irene Palomar — Maria Grazia Pane — Ana ParedesMabel PenaSandra Pulgar — Gabriela Rapoport — Patricia Rodriguez — Claudia Rosenberg — Maria Gracia Salinas — Marita Sario — Ruth Schaffer — Liliana Schissel — Claudia Schnaider — María Eugenia Solís — Maria Solórzano — Gabriela Squassini — Sabina Tiemroth — Albertina Tozzini — Beatriz Velardo — Fabiana Vodanovich Casañas — Silvia Vollaro — Ana Weisz — Anita Zalts — Beatriz Zarazaga.
 
Workshops of Jorge Castañón, Fabiana Gadano and Mabel Pena.
Humans are facing, embodied their own reflection, a powerful enemy: their own capacity for self-destruction.
To question the massive and indiscriminate urban waste production is the starting point for change, the need to modify behaviors that separate us from natural balance.
During the last ten years, contemporary jewelry in Argentina has grown exponentially, expressing ideas and concepts. On this occasion, the work of the workshops of Castañón, of Pena and of Gadano, is an invitation to make us think of that which is of use and of no use, which we do not know, which we forget, and of the possibility of generating profound changes in our lifestile habits in favor of ourselves.
Fabiana  Gadano, Brooch,
Fabiana  Gadano, Brooch – Water bottles, PET plastic (polyethylene terephthalate) Recycled material
Mirta  Kraves, Necklace,
Mirta  Kraves, Necklace – Water bottles, PET plastic (polyethylene terephthalate) Recycled material
Susana Ortiz, Necklace, Susana Ortiz – Necklace – Cardboard egg’s packaging  Recycled material
Ana Paredes, Brooch,
Ana Paredes – Brooch – Milk cream containers, HDPE plastic (high density polyethylene)  Recycled material
EXPO pendiente - Gabriela Miguel - Brooch:  Polyethylene garbage bags
Gabriela Miguel – Brooch:  Polyethylene garbage bags
EXPO pendiente - Mabel Pena - collar selva
Mabel Pena – collar selva – bolsas de supermercado –   Recycled material
CCEBA, Centro Cultural de España en Buenos Aires
Sede Florida 943
- Buenos Aires
Argentina

03/07/2013

Le Bonheur de regarder un bijou de Jack Cunningham

Jack Cunningham

Jack Cunningham is an academic and contemporary studio jeweller whose particular interest is narrative jewellery, being that which tells a story or makes a statement through visual imagery.

Jack Cunningham trained at Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art in Dundee and is currently head of silversmithing and jewellery at Glasgow School of Art where he has taught since 1990.
« I am motivated by the construct of our relationship with family, place, people, of recollection and memory, life and death. I am also interested in the dialogue that is consequently established between the maker – the originator of the artefacts statement, the wearer – the vehicle by which the work is seen, and the viewer – the audience who thereafter engages with the work.
I work exclusively with the brooch form to explore these personal narrative themes, which are sourced during numerous visits to Japan and time spent in Glasgow and Paris. »
His work is held in a number of public collections including the National Museums of Scotland and the Musee des Arts Decoratif in Montreal. He has exhibited widely in the UK and abroad and was a shortlisted finalist for the Jerwood Applied Arts Prize 2000

Chaque fois que je me retrouve face à un bijou, souvent une broche, de Jack Cunningham, j’ai un sourire… C’est comme retrouver son âme d’enfant, une fraicheur, une joie de vivre, une « simplicité » qui font chaud au coeur …. Je suis peut-être naïve ou simple d’esprit, mais ses bijoux me font du bien au coeur, ce ne sont pas des « crises esthétiques » mais « juste » de petits bonheurs …..

« In most of my designs I aspire to evoke a feeling of nostalgia. I consciously work in a miniature scale, using a diverse range of materials in order to create attention so that the onlooker has to become more involved in the piece, hopefully sparking memory or thought as well as making them smile. »

oui, tout à fait ……………

Jack CunninghamFragments -  Brooch 2006 – white metal, garnet, green coral, wood, crystal

Jack Cunningham - Fragments Brooch 2006 white metal, coral, readymadeJack Cunningham – Fragments Brooch 2006 white metal, coral, readymade

 » The choice of materials in the pieces reflects an alchemical collage approach. Plastic and coral, biscuit tin and garnet; the found and the sought-after cohabit in many pieces where, most succesfully they show the validity of each person’s story as an ‘everything-except-the-obvious’ approach in order to put across a personal coherence, a revelation and a testimony, and ultimately a report on the highlights of the experience of cultural transplantation.  » (about the Narrative jewelryAnalysis of ‘Transplantation A sense of place and culture- British and Australian Narrative Jewellery’ – Samuel O’Hana – Manchester, Samuel O’Hana, 2012- Klimt02-forum)

Jack Cunningham, 'The Great Barrier'  Photo by Electric EggJack Cunningham, ‘The Great Barrier’  Photo by Electric Egg

Jack Cunningham  Brooch: The Great Barrier (series)  Found objects (detail)  Photo by Electric EggJack Cunningham  Brooch: The Great Barrier series (detail) – Found objects   Photo by Electric Egg

Jack Cunningham - "Kit" series -   Love Kit Blue  Brooch 2002 white metal, enamel, moonstone, turquoise, cultured pearl, amethyst, sodaliteJack Cunningham – « Kit » series -   Love Kit Blue  Brooch 2002 white metal, enamel, moonstone, turquoise, cultured pearl, amethyst, sodalite

Jack Cunningham - "Kit" series - Nature Kit  Brooch 2003 - white metal, amber, shell, cultured pearl, amethystJack Cunningham – « Kit » series – Nature Kit  Brooch 2003 – white metal, amber, shell, cultured pearl, amethyst

Jack CunninghamJack Cunningham – « I collect many things, but this particular collection is based on plastic and lead geese and chickens, which were manufactured by a Company called Britains. » The story behind the collection… : « I am a contemporary narrative jeweller (in addition to being a full time Academic), and therefore collect small items which may in some way, convey a message, tell a story or trigger a memory. »

The "Paris" series - Midnight Blues  Brooch 2003 - white metal, lapis lazuli, agate, turquoise  http://www.jackcunningham.co.uk/jack_phd/m.htmlThe « Paris » series – Midnight Blues  Brooch 2003 – white metal, lapis lazuli, agate, turquoise 

Jack Cunningham - "Japan" series -  "The Peak" brooch 2003 white metal, obsidian, jade, nephrite, rock crystalJack Cunningham – « Japan » series -  « The Peak » brooch 2003 white metal, obsidian, jade, nephrite, rock crystal

Jack Cunningham - 'Relationship' Series - "How deep is your love"  brooch 2010 - white metal, bone, wood, cultured pearl, aquamarineJack Cunningham – ‘Relationship’ Series – « How deep is your love »  brooch 2010 – white metal, bone, wood, cultured pearl, aquamarine

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