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28/02/2017

EXCHANGE-BIJOU 1 – Ute van der PLAATS at LOOT spring 2017

Ute van der PLAATS

have been selected to participate in the 2017 spring edition of LOOT: Mad About Jewelry at the Museum of Arts and Design in New York. From April 4 through 8, 2017

‘LOOT: Mad About Jewelry’ Returns this Spring with 54 Artists from 21 Countries

LOOT spring 2017

From April 4 through 8, 2017, the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD) presents LOOT: MAD About Jewelry, the annual exhibition and sale of contemporary art jewelry. Now in its 17th edition, LOOT presents a cross-section of the most exciting cutting-edge art jewelry designs, while offering the public a rare opportunity to meet and acquire pieces directly from some of the most skilled creators in the field. A striking example of the evolving possibilities of jewelry as an art form, LOOT: MAD About Jewelry champions the vision and craftsmanship of outstanding art jewelers—most of whom have never before shown work in the United States.

This year’s edition welcomes 54 artists from 21 countries, the majority of whom have never been shown in New York. All were selected by Bryna Pomp following a full year of travel and research. For the first time, LOOT will feature three artists from Iceland and one from Romania. There will also be artists from Argentina (1), Austria (2), Belgium (1), Canada (1), Denmark (3), Finland (2), France (5), Germany (4), Greece (2), Holland (1), Israel (1), Italy (5), Korea (2), Norway (1), Portugal (1), Spain (2), United Kingdom (10), and United States (6). [.....]

The 2017 presentation includes driftwood, neoprene, marble, sheer plywood, textiles, ceramic, aluminum, beading, and acrylic. A significant trend this year is the use of recycled materials, including china tableware, plastic bottles and shopping bags, and even skateboards.”
This year, over two dozen artists have designed jewelry using natural forms as their subjects. Artists showcasing their nature-inspired designs include Hebe Argentieri (Argentina); Katharina Eder (Austria); Ute van der Plaats (Belgium); Aino Favén (Finland); Silke Lazarević (Germany); Guðbjörg Ingvarsdóttir (Iceland); Mario Salvucci (Italy); Sowon Joo (Korea); Sunyoung Kim (Korea); Åse-Marit Thorbjørnsrud (Norway); Raluca Buzura (Romania); Ana Hagopian (Spain); Jane Adam (UK); Jacqueline Clarke (UK); Olivia Creber (UK); and Iradj Moini (USA). Visitors will meet Finnish artist Inni Pärnänen, who makes floral designs using sheer plywood, and English artist Rie Taniguchi, whose jewelry depicts animals and birds. Fellow English jewelry artist Olivia Creber uses molten metal with minerals, while French artist Delphine Nardin uses sea glass, gold, and silver to design jewelry inspired by the ocean. And Icelandic artist Helga Mogensen uses driftwood and visible threads to create unique statement necklaces. »

 

THE LOOT ACQUISITION PRIZE
Awarded by a jury, the LOOT Acquisition Prize seeks to recognize a LOOT jewelry artist whose work reflects a maturity in artistry and concept; exhibits both a superior and experimental understanding of materials and form; and demonstrates expertise in technique and execution. The 2017 jury is chaired by William and Mildred Lasdon Chief Curator Shannon R. Stratton, Assistant Curator Barbara Paris Gifford, and LOOT Curator Bryna Pomp. The 2017 LOOT Acquisition Prize will be awarded on April 3 at the Opening Benefit dinner.

2017 LOOT ARTISTS (click to see more pictures):

Jane Adam
Hebe Argentieri
Kate Bajic
Giulia Barela
Ferràn Iglesias Barón
Marianne Batlle
Abigail Brown
Ilka Bruse
Raluca Buzura
Michelle Cangiano
Jacqueline Clarke
Cor Sine Labe Doli
Olivia Creber
Julie Decubber
Anne Dinan
Katharina Eder
Gaëtan Essayie
Aino Favén
Liliana Guerreiro
Aurélie Guillaume
Ana Hagopian
Guðbjörg Ingvarsdóttir
Sowon Joo
Jeong Ju Lee
Kaori Juzu
Sunyoung Kim
Saerom Kong
Konrad Laimer
Silke Lazarević
Tara Locklear
Lucy Martin
Jo McAllister
Rhona McCallum
Helga Mogensen
Iradj Moini
Gerda and Nikolai Monies
Delphine Nardin
Iris Nijenhuis
Semeli Androulidaki and Labros Papageorgiou
Inni Pärnänen
Amalia Petsali
Anna Porcu
Hélène Prime
Hlín Reykdal
Andrea Rosales-Balcarcel
Mario Salvucci
Louise Seijen ten Hoorn
Inbar Shahak
Rie Taniguchi
Åse-Marit Thorbjørnsrud
Karola Torkos
Kristin Urup
Ute van der Plaats
Katrin Zimmermann

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 Ute van der PlaatsUte van der Plaats

« Born in Germany and based in Brussels, Belgium, Ute van der Plaats has worked as a jewelry designer since 2009. In addition to contemporary jewelry, she has a passion for graphic design and ceramics, and her latest collection combines these three disciplines. A few years ago, she discovered porcelain—the white gold—and fell in love with it. Since then, this pure material has become the starting point in the creation process of her jewelry collections. She is attracted by its translucent white color, the fragile appearance that belies a surprisingly solid character, and the almost sensual texture of unglazed porcelain. By integrating different materials, such as 3D-printed ornaments and digitally designed images, into handcrafted porcelain creations, she translates traditional jewelry concepts into contemporary pieces. « 

Ute van der PlaatsUte van der Plaats

Ute van der Plaats - add a little of blue ..... fevr 2017Ute van der Plaats - add a little of blue ….. fevr 2017

Ute van der Plaats - add a little of blue ..... fevr 2017Ute van der Plaats – add a little of blue ….. fevr 2017

 

ARTIST HIGHLIGHTS :

  • Ferràn Iglesias Barón (Spain) has over 20 years of experience in goldsmithing, encompassing academic studies and written publications, teaching, and exhibitions. He is the recipient of numerous awards. Essence and meaning are two driving forces of his growth and creative process. Barón uses the interaction of different mediums and chromas to express emotion, transcending aesthetics to create a new form of beauty and appeal.
  • Ute van der Plaats (Belgium) integrates different materials, such as 3D-printed ornaments and digitally designed images, into handcrafted porcelain creations, thus translating traditional jewelry concepts into contemporary pieces.
  • Michelle Cangiano (Australia) produces limited-edition handmade contemporary jewelry and one-off pieces for private commissions. For her “Paper Cuts” collection, Cangiano draws on her painting background and employs the simple yet time-consuming technique of threading and knotting paper discs to create pieces that seem to shift and change color as they move with the wearer.
  • Julie Decubber (France) specializes in antique porcelain and earthenware plates, turning ordinary objects into unique jewels that explore the theme of memory. Decubber cuts and reassembles pieces in order to highlight what is precious in the ordinary, applying techniques of the jeweler, stonecutter, and potter to generate elegant and unexpected combinations.
  • Aino Favén (Finland) moves between art and design to explore the achievements of nature and man. Her pieces made of translucent plastic bags are subtle comments on the large trash islands floating in oceans and endangering nature and wildlife. They also serve as memorial garlands for birds and other animals who have died from eating plastic waste.
  • Aurélie Guillaume (Canada) is reviving the idea of narrative in enameling through a contemporary context fueled by street art, comics, pop art, and counterculture. A jeweler, enamelist, and illustrator, she begins her designs with illustrations, which through the process of enameling are given new life in the physical world as wearable objects.
  • Guðbjörg Ingvarsdóttir (Iceland) takes inspiration from the Icelandic wilderness. She allows her collections to continually evolve, underlining the organic process of translating concept into finished article.
  • Sunyoung Kim (Korea) finds inspiration in the world of plants, which though frail have a strong hold on life. She focuses on representing this strength with thin metal plates, which she processes through hammering and injection using various chasing tools.
  • Konrad Laimer (Italy) has defined his works through themed workshops ranging from jewelry to objects and graphics. Through installations, international workshops, and multimedia works, he transfers his concepts to various artistic mediums and locations. The Alps have become Laimer’s main source of inspiration in regard to both themes and materials.
  • Silke Lazarević (Germany) focuses on natural materials, with the aim of expressing their inherent qualities and various potentialities. She finds inspiration in the coincidence involved in the process of working with parchment, which as a natural product follows its own logic.
  • Helga Mogensen (Iceland) creates neckpieces of all sorts, as well as smaller-scale works such as earrings, using driftwood in combination with thread and sterling silver. Mogensen considers the thread to represent human connection.
  • Iradj Moini (United States), a jewelry designer with a background in architecture, specializes in the usage of bold stones. In 2006, his jewelry was on display at the Metropolitan Museum of Art as part of Iris Apfel’s collection, in addition to being featured at the Louvre, where he has three pieces in the permanent collection.
  • Delphine Nardin (France) designs jewelry around pieces of found sea glass, rough stones formed billions of years ago, and other collected relics. She combines these found eroded treasures with 18-karat gold or silver to create completely unique, delicate, and understated pieces of wearable history, which forge new links between archaeology and modernity.
  • Hélène Prime (France) creates unique pieces made of horn and of leather, each adorned with semiprecious stones. All of her creations are handmade with the greatest care in Paris and produced in limited series, using metal gilded with fine gold and natural stones.

 

 

Museum of Arts and Design (MAD Museum)
Jerome and Simona Chazen Building / 2 Columbus Circle /
New York, NY 10019
(212) 299-7777

EXHIBITION AND SALE HOURS
Tuesday, April 4: 10 am to 7 pm
Wednesday, April 5: 10 am to 8 pm
Thursday, April 6: 10 am to 9 pm
Friday, April 7: 10 am to 6 pm
Saturday, April 8: 10 am to 6 pm
Entrance is free with Museum admission.
For questions regarding LOOT 2017, please call Rebekka Grossman at 212.299.7712 or email rebekka.grossman@madmuseum.org.

 

 

 

Enregistrer

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21/05/2014

EXPO ‘Multiple Exposures : Jewelry and Photography’ – MAD Museum, New York (USA) – 13 Mai-14 Sept. 2014

« Multiple Exposures »

exhibition at Museum of Arts and Design (MAD Museum), New York, featuring:
JANTJE FLEISCHHUTMARI ISHIKAWAJIRO KAMATA and SHARI PIERCE.

Upcoming exhibition at Museum of Arts and Design, New York, featuring:<br />JANTJE FLEISCHHUT, MARI ISHIKAWA, JIRO KAMATA and SHARI PIERCE.<br />http://madmuseum.org/exhibition/multiple-exposures
 
Multiple Exposures: Jewelry and Photography is the first museum exhibition to explore how contemporary jewelry artists transform and add new meaning to the pervasive images of this digital age.  Drawing inspiration from historic daguerreotypes to manipulated digital images, international jewelry artists explore changing views of beauty and the human body; examine social, political, and cultural issues; probe perceptions of memory and desire; and question the broader relation of jewelry to society and personal identity, issues central to the contemporary experience.
 
More than 80 renowned artists from over 20 countries are represented —including
Gijs Bakker, Wafaa Bilal, Jordan Doner, Mari Ishikawa, Jiro Kamata, Sooyeon Kim, Iris Nieuwenburg, Kara Ross, Gabriela Sanchez, Bernhard Schobinger, Bettina Speckner,
Joyce Scott, Kiff Slemmons, Andy Warhol and Noa Zilberman.
 
The connection between photography and jewelry extends back more than 150 years to the invention of the photographic process.  The exhibition will provide historical context for this evolving relationship by presenting outstanding nineteenth-century pieces, many of which have never before been exhibited. In recent years, both photography and art jewelry have changed dramatically, and the exhibition will present cutting-edge videos and installations that will provide viewers a broader perspective of contemporary jewelry now.
Organized by MAD’s Curator of Jewelry, Ursula Ilse-Neuman, Multiple Exposures: Jewelry and Photography will be on view from May 13 to September 14, 2014.
Multiple Exposures: Jewelry and Photography will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue with essays by Ursula Ilse-Neuman, MAD’s Acting Chief Curator Lowery Stokes Sims, Dutch author and jewelry curator Liesbeth den Besten, photography expert Mark Durant, Curator of Decorative Arts at the Toledo Museum of Art Jutta Page, American author and Metalsmith editor Suzanne Ramljak, photography historian and critic Lyle Rexer and German author and critic Ellen Maurer Zillioli.
The exhibition will be accompanied by a full range of educational programming, including lectures and panels for adults, workshops for young visitors and families, in-house demonstrations of jewelry making, curator-led tours of the exhibition, and a variety of film screenings.
Gijs Bakker Waterman; (brooch), 1991Gijs Bakker – « Waterman » (brooch), 1991 – black & white photo, diamonds, white gold
Martin Papcύn, Ring, 1999Martin Papcun, Ring, 1999 – artist photopgraph, silver, brass
EXPO 'Multiple Exposures : Jewelry and Photography' - MAD Museum, New York (USA) - 13 Mai-14 Sept. 2014 dans Bernhard SCHOBINGER (CH) slideshow_close

 
Célio Braga  -  Golden Boys Collection/ Silver Boys Collection (strings/ colliers), 2010–11  Fragments of digital C-prints, double-sided tape, glitter  Collection of the artist  Photo by Cris Bierrenbach Braga_Celio_C_LORES.jpgCélio Braga  -  Golden Boys Collection/ Silver Boys Collection (strings/ colliers), 2010–11  Fragments of digital C-prints, double-sided tape, glitter  Collection of the artist  Photo by Cris Bierrenbach
Bernhard  Schobinger  Self-Portrait with Nose (brooch), 2010 - Digital photograph on commuter card, hologram, silver, coral  Courtesy of Gallery S O  Photo courtesy of Gallery S OBernhard  Schobinger  Self-Portrait with Nose (brooch), 2010 – Digital photograph on commuter card, hologram, silver, coral  Courtesy of Gallery S O  Photo courtesy of Gallery S O
Viktoria Munzker-Ferus__27th-Week-Brooch.jpg  27th Week (brooch) from the Secret series, 2004  Image dimensions: 640px  x  427px  Viktoria Münzker  Sonogram printed on transparent plastic-foil, silver, plastic hemispheres  Collection of the artist  Photo by Viktoria Münzker
Viktoria Munzker-Ferus -  27th Week (brooch) from the Secret series, 2004  Image dimensions: 640px  x  427px  Viktoria Münzker  Sonogram printed on transparent plastic-foil, silver, plastic hemispheres  Collection of the artist  Photo by Viktoria Münzker
Ramon Puig Cuyàs - N° 1279, Ita est (brooch) from the UTOPOS series, 2009  Internet images, enamel, acrylic resin, silver, nickel silver, onyx, shell, pearl, coral, plastic  Courtesy of a private collection  Photo by Ramon Puig CuyàsRamon Puig Cuyàs - N° 1279, Ita est (brooch) from the UTOPOS series, 2009  Internet images, enamel, acrylic resin, silver, nickel silver, onyx, shell, pearl, coral, plastic  Courtesy of a private collection  Photo by Ramon Puig Cuyàs
Sally von Bargen - Elegy (neckpiece), 2008  Digital photographs on paper, brass, paint  Collection of the artist  Photo by Sally von Bargen
Sally von Bargen – Elegy (neckpiece), 2008  Digital photographs on paper, brass, paint  Collection of the artist  Photo by Sally von Bargen
 Sooyeon Kim  - House on Benefit Street (neckpiece), 2010   Artist’s digital photographs on paper, fabric, magnets  Collection of the artist  Photo by Sooyeon Kim   Sooyeon Kim  – House on Benefit Street (neckpiece), 2010   Artist’s digital photographs on paper, fabric, magnets  Collection of the artist  Photo by Sooyeon Kim
Support for Multiple Exposures: Jewelry and Photography has been provided by Hasselblad, Kara Ross NY, Betsy Z. and Edward E. Cohen, Washington Square Hotel, the Swiss Arts Council Pro Helvetia, the Dutch Culture USA program by the Consulate General of the Netherlands in New York, Creative New Zealand, Janet Kardon, and Frame Finland. Additional support is made possible in part through the generosity of the Inner Circle, one of the Museum’s leadership support groups.
 
2 Columbus Circle
New York, NY 10019
info@madmuseum.org
212-299-7777

25/09/2013

LOOT 2013: MAD about Jewelry – 1-5 Oct. 2013

Classé dans : Exposition/Exhibition,MAD Museum (US),SHOP,USA — bijoucontemporain @ 0:43

The Museum of Arts and Design will present LOOT 2013: MAD about Jewelry, its curated exhibition and sale of artist-made jewelry for four days this October. Now in its 13th edition, LOOT: MAD about Jewelry has become known as the ultimate pop-up shop for contemporary art and studio jewelry by both artists and collectors alike; it affords the public the rare opportunity to acquire pieces directly from some of the most innovative jewelry artists in the world. This year, the creations of more than 50 emerging and acclaimed jewelry artists will be on sale. Prices will range from $200 to $12,000, with $1000 the average. Proceeds from the selling show will benefit the Museum’s exhibition and education programs.

Opening Benefit:
Tuesday, October 1, 4:30PM to 8PM
The Show Continues:
Wednesday, October 2, 11AM to 6PM
Thursday, October 3, 11AM to 9PM
Friday, October 4, 11AM to 9PM
Saturday, October 5, 11AM to 6PM

LOOT 2013: Violaine Ulmer - porcelain
Violaine Ulmer (FR) - porcelain necklace
For Parisian jeweler Violaine Ulmer, the conception of a new piece of jewelry involves consideration of the interactions of light, transparency, form, & space to create a plastic object, not just an item of adornment. Each piece is above all a sculpture & a further source of experimentation. This approach gives form to “objewels” (objects-sculptures-jewelry), work that can be placed at the intersection of art, fashion, & design. Her current explorations focus on the meeting point between specific porcelain techniques & classic jewelry-making processes. Through this research, Ulmer evolves forms that exploit the fundamental character of her materials; they are both generous & pared to the essence.
Mathilde Quinchez .Mathilde Quinchez (FR)
Inspired by the lines found in nature, and more particularly by seeds and cocoons, Paris-based designer Mathilde Quinchez conveys a subtle and sensual world at fertility’s moment of origin. She communicates the most intimate matters with delicacy: her small, original cells convey a latent strength, comprising both the essence and the entirety of the universe. Beyond symbols, Quinchez brings us back to our perception of our senses—a wide range of simple and vital emotions. Her work also reflects on time, in her careful attention to detail, and the patina that the jewels will eventually wear. Quinchez’s way of working with silver, her pure lines and forms that explore fullness and emptiness, and her delicate perforations make her jewels extremely refined. In her hands, the metal becomes a synthesis of light, femininity and subtlety.
Andrea PinerosAndrea Pineros (FR)
 Andrea Pineros ’ work is based on the themes of structure and lightness. With his background in design, he is inspired by urban constructions such as bridges, towers, stairs, and even transport networks. As he observes Paris, its inhabitants, its intrinsic rhythms and movements, he considers the thousands of daily trips that form networks and links. Pineros transcribes these ideas into jewelry, focusing on the essential concepts of full and empty, tension between links, proportion and equilibrium, growth and chaos. The wire he uses to create his designs serves as a pencil does for an architect: this thread which can stretch out, multiply, and fill an entire space allows him to express his creative universe. His pieces remind us that the preciousness of an object resides not only in its material but in its esprit. Through his jewelry, Pineros reduces the monumental in scale to make it accessible and finally tame.
LOOT 2013 Florence Croisier
Florence Croisier (FR)
Florence Croisier composes with the body, catching the variants of composition that movement can offer. Born in Geneva, Croisier graduated from Geneva’s School of Decorative Arts and worked in Paris as a designer or maker for different companies until 1999, when she started her own collection. Three years later, she began working with titanium. This material’s durability, hypoallergenic property, and capacity to take on beautiful colors allowed Croisier to fully express her creativity—and titanium’s lightness allows the wearer to pile on as many pieces as desired while retaining complete freedom of movement. Croisier started this work using a sculptural approach, but later began to use titanium wire as a kind of pencil permitting her to draw directly with the material. Others of Croisier’s pieces are assembled from an accumulation of repetitive elements organized into a structure that is sometimes completely random, sometimes inspired by nature.
LOOT 2013 Fabien Ifirès
Fabien Ifirès

Self-taught designer Fabien Ifirès apprenticed in luxury saddlery and handmade shoe-making workshops. He decided to create his own label in 2010 in collaboration with Michaël Vandewielle. His mastery of traditional sewing techniques allows him to explore all the possibilities of leather, his favorite material, and offer pieces that are precious and unique due to his meticulous creative process. All of Ifirès’ jewels are entirely handmade according to traditional saddlery techniques, with very high quality leathers sourced from the best European tanneries.

Hungarian designer Janka Juhos was born into a family of artists, and so her future career was marked out well in advance. After receiving her BFA in 2010, Juhos founded her own jewelry design company, JUJJ.
Hungarian designer Janka Juhos was born into a family of artists, and so her future career was marked out well in advance. After receiving her BFA in 2010, Juhos founded her own jewelry design company, JUJJ.
LOOT 2013: Yoko Shimizu
Yoko Shimizu
Japanese designer Yoko Shimizu studied at Alchimia Contemporary Jewelry School in Florence, Italy, and chose to stay there to establish her jewelry practice. Living in a foreign country has heightened Shimizu’s consciousness of her cultural background and natural sense of expression and aesthetics. Subtleness and simplicity, fragility and vigor, harmony and tension are all important to her work. The theme of her collection in resin is transformation, which is manifest in Shimizu’s exploration of the mutability of forms, materials, and colors. Pieces of wood are alchemized into pieces of resin, and the surface of wood is transferred onto the surface of the resin. The metamorphosis of wood to resin, of natural to artificial, of opaque to transparent, and the continuous changes that occur when the jewels are worn on the body … all of these inspire Shimizu’s work.
LOOT 2013: Michihiro Sato
Michihiro Sato
Michihiro Sato became interested in contemporary jewelry when he was an arts education student in Japan. After his graduation, he traveled to the University of Pforzheim in Germany to research the field. This was the beginning of a very long stay in Germany, where he gained valuable experiences and perspectives as a citizen, an employee of several advertising agencies, and finally a freelance artist before he left the country in 2002 to study jewelry in Oslo, Norway. Most importantly, in Germany Sato encountered the philosophy of Buddhism, which has influenced his work. Sato is currently living and working in Osaka, Japan as a freelance jewelry artist and teacher. He creates his jewels using various materials, including paper, silver and resin. His experiences living in different cultures have had a great impact on his creations. For Sato, something transient is beautiful if he has the insight to perceive something permanent
Jo Hayes Ward Constructing jewelry from small building blocks,
Jo Hayes Ward – Constructing jewelry from small building blocks

01/09/2012

LOOT 2012: Mad about Jewelry – EXPO-VENTE – MAD Museum, NY (USA) – 11-15 Sept. 2012

 LOOT 2012: Mad about Jewelry

The Museum of Arts and Design will present LOOT 2012: MAD about Jewelry, its juried selling exhibition of artist-made jewelry for four days this October. Now in its 12th year, LOOT: MAD about Jewelry has become known as the ultimate pop-up shop for contemporary art and studio jewelry by both artists and collectors alike; it affords the public the rare opportunity to acquire pieces directly from some of the most innovative jewelry artists in the world. This year, the creations of 50 emerging and acclaimed jewelry artists will be on sale. Prices will range from $200 to $12,000, with $1000 the average. Proceeds from the selling show will benefit the Museum’s exhibition and education programs. LOOT 2012  (Artists: Nikolay Sardamov)  11-15 sept 2012

LOOT 2012: MAD About Jewelry, the ultimate pop-up shop for contemporary art and studio jewelry, whose proceeds benefit the Exhibition and Education programs of the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD Museum), will run from Tuesday through Saturday, September 11 – 15, 2012.
Unlike any other jewelry event in the country, LOOT 2012 gives jewelry lovers the opportunity to meet some of the most innovative creators in the field and acquire work directly from them. This 12th edition of LOOT will be the largest and most international ever, with jewelry by more than 50 emerging and acclaimed artists, hailing from 12 countries.
It will also showcase the work of jewelry students from New York’s own Fashion Institute of Technology.

LOOT 2012  (Necklace by Emmeline Hastings)
(Necklace by Emmeline Hastings)

Like last year, the exhibition and sale has been curated by Bryna Pomp, a jewelry specialist, and Nancy Olnick, a noted collector; they selected the artists for their originality, use of materials, and expert craftsmanship. Much effort was also made to find distinguished artists from around the world.

Among those in this year’s roster will be the acclaimed German bead artist Axel Russmeyer, who in addition to participating in the exhibition and sale will be awarded the inaugural LOOT Award for Contemporary Art Jewelry. This annual prize is in keeping with the long-standing commitment of the Museum of Arts and Design to presenting jewelry as an art form. MAD is the only American museum to possess a gallery dedicated to the display of both temporary jewelry exhibits and its own collection of contemporary and modern studio and art jewelry, which it began assembling soon after its founding in 1956.

“Axel Russmeyer is an artist whose outstanding achievement in crafting highly original and exceptionally beautiful jewelry sets the standard of excellence for all in this medium,” says Michele Cohen, the Chair of LOOT 2012. “His color and texture combinations and his sense of design take beaded jewelry to another level of the imagination. You have only to see and touch his pieces to understand why his work is coveted by the most prestigious museums and private collectors around the world.”

 

Other notable jewelry artists participating in LOOT 2012 are:
Eimear Conyard
This Irish artist views jewelry as object as much as adornment. In addition to producing splendid, yet spare pendants, brooches, and rings, she also makes limited-edition timepieces. For LOOT 2012, she will offer a new
collection of timepieces, specifically designed for the exhibition.
Eva Eisler
In Europe, this Czech artist is as well known for her tabletop, lighting, and furniture designs, as for her minimalist art jewelry. The chair of the metals department at Prague’s Academy of Arts, Architecture, and Design, she will bring along the work of six of her top students, two of whom will be in attendance.
Emmeline Hastings
A sculptor as well as a jeweler, this British artist works in Perspex and a variety of metals to create wearable objects that evoke the motion and pattern of waves.
Dominique Labordery
Working in agate, oxidized silver, and gold, this Belgian-born, Dusseldorf based artist uses minimalist details to the maximum effect.
Jeremy May
This British artist makes jewelry from carved out book pages, which he laminates and polishes. The excavated tome then serves as the jewelry container.
Kazumi Nagano
The Tokyo-based Nagano brings the sensibilities of traditional Japanese painting to jewelry making. Woven out of strands of silver and gold, silk, nylon, and Japanese paper thread, her jewelry is subtle, yet sumptuous,
and gossamerlike in weight.
Linda van Niekerk
Rare Tasmanian wood and tidal stones, ribbons of sterling silver, chunky discs of African amber, and oxidized Turkomen beads are among the materials from which this master artist, born in South Africa, now based in
Tasmania, makes striking wearable sculpture.
Joe Pillari
This Philadelphia-based artist makes enigmatic hand-painted enamel brooches inspired by old photographs.
Nikolay Sardamov
This Bulgarian artist jeweler creates a rigid meshwork out of clusters and layers of circles in silver and gold. While the geometry is simple, the effect is rich in pattern and density.

necklace by Dominique Labordery -- made out of agate, oxidized silver, and gold. Dominique Laborderynecklace  made out of agate, oxidized silver, and gold.
Emmeline Hastings    UK-based artist Emmeline Hastings finds her inspiration in the visualization of sound waves, music, and correlating natural phenomena. She is fascinated by the molecularEmmeline Hastings
beautiful beaded earrings by the legendary jewelry artist Axel RussmeyerAxel Russmeyer beaded earrings 

Kathleen Nowak TucciKathleen Nowak Tucci

 

2012 Graduates of the Jewelry Design Program at FIT, New York   Dana Bodourov — Kaitlin Dunn — Alison Francis — David Hakimian — Melissa Kaye — Selin Kent — Ana Kim — Alexandra Kouadia-Borno — Cole Lopez — Enjung Sung — Veronica Ledovsky

 

 

Museum of Arts and Design (MAD Museum)
2 Columbus Circle,
New York, NY 10019

12/12/2011

EXPO ‘Picasso to Koons: Artist as Jeweler’ – Museum of Arts and Design, – 20 Sept. 2011- 8 Janv. 2012

Classé dans : BOOKS / BIBLIO,Exposition/Exhibition,MAD Museum (US),USA — bijoucontemporain @ 18:02

Jewelry as Sculpture in Miniature at the Museum of Arts and Design

A brooch of ruby lips and cultured pearl teeth made by Salvador Dali, a pendant depicting an abstract face by Roy Lichtenstein and a gold mask designed by Man Ray are among the 240 pieces of jewelry currently on view at the Museum of Arts and Design.

The exhibition, Picasso to Koons: Artist as Jeweler,

Pablo Picasso, Georges Braque, Max Ernst, Jasper Johns, Robert Rauschenberg, Jeff Koons and Anish Kapoor are some of the 20th century’s greatest and best known artists. What is less well known are the incredible works of sculptural beauty created by these artists in the form of jewelry. Guest curated by Diane Venet (featured in the accompanying video), with over 180 masterpieces, Picasso to Koons: Artist as Jewelerexplores works from an array of artists, not known as jewelers, who have created stunning works of jewelry both reminiscent of their existing artistic vocabulary and in other instances representing a striking departure from their oeuvre. These richly imaginative pieces were never intended for mainstream production, but rather were created as one-of-a-kind pieces or limited editions, that were often personal gifts made for family and friends, revealing an intimate view into the lives of the artists who created them. The exhibition will be accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue published by Flammarion/Rizzoli.

 http://media.wnyc.org/media/photologue/photos/cache/Koons__storyslide_image.jpg

Jeff Koons‘ « Pendant: Rabbit Necklace » – He made the piece between 2005 and 2009 (Photo by Sherry Griffin. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.)

http://media.wnyc.org/media/photologue/photos/roy_lichtenstein.jpg

pendant depicting an abstract face by Roy Lichtenstein. (Photo by Sherry Griffin. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.)

http://media.wnyc.org/media/photologue/photos/cache/picasso_le_grand_faune_storyslide_image.jpg

 Pablo Picasso pendant, « Le gran Faune »  1973 (Photo by Sherry Griffin. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.)

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Max Ernst brooch « Tête Triangle. » (Photo by Sherry Griffin. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.)

http://media.wnyc.org/media/photologue/photos/cache/calder_necklace_storyslide_image.jpg

Alexander Calder – necklace – 1935 (Photo by Sherry Griffin. Courtesy of the Museum of Arts and Design.)

MAD Museum
2 Columbus Circle
New York, NY 10019
212-299-7777

 

BOOK :

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From Picasso to Koons, the Artist as Jeweler – Diane Venet – Skira – 2011 – 240 pp.

08/10/2011

LOOT 2011: Mad about Jewelry – EXPO-VENTE – MAD Museum, NY (USA) – 11-14 Oct. 2011

Classé dans : Exposition/Exhibition,MAD Museum (US),SHOP,USA — bijoucontemporain @ 14:11

The Museum of Arts and Design will present
LOOT 2011: Mad about Jewelry,
its juried selling exhibition of artist-made jewelry for four days this October.
Now in its 11th year, LOOT: MAD about Jewelry has become known as the ultimate pop-up shop for contemporary art and studio jewelry by both artists and collectors alike; it affords the public the rare opportunity to acquire pieces directly from some of the most innovative jewelry artists in the world. This year, the creations of 50 emerging and acclaimed jewelry artists will be on sale. Prices will range from $200 to $12,000, with $1000 the average. Proceeds from the selling show will benefit the Museum’s exhibition and education programs.

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MAD – Museum of Arts & Design
2 Columbus Circle
New York, NY 10019
212-299-7777

02/04/2011

COUP de COEUR ! Jennifer TRASK

avec Jennifer TRASK  j’ai eu l’impression d’entrer dans le domaine des elfes et des trolls, sur fond de musique de Björk ……..

Represented at SOFA NEW YORK by Ornamentum, Hudson, NY
Jennifer TRASK has an M.F.A. in metalsmithing from the State University of New York at New Paltz. Inspired by man’s effect on nature, Trask uses salvageable materials like pre-ban ivory, antlers, gold and palladium to create fantastical botanical arrangements. Trask says her “recycled materials address the uncomfortable distance we have created from nature itself. The references are specific, biological and metaphoric…Beauty is great, but I’m more interested in getting people to look at the unusual.” Jennifer Trask will also be a speaker in the SOFA NEW YORK 2011 Lecture Series.

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Jennifer Trask’s  Calciflora (Agavacea) brooch ‘Corona’ – 18K gold, palladium gold, bone, teeth (deer), sapphires, rainbow moonstones -
‘Unnatural Histories’ series, Flourish (2008), begins with the following definitions of the word flourish:
1. To grow well or luxuriantly; thrive
2. To do or fare well; prosper
3. To be in a period of highest productivity; excellence or influence.
4. To make bold or sweeping movements

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_vQwjpChUGaU/TCJsK8da55I/AAAAAAAABvc/nrDQ0JN0220/s1600/Jennifer+Trask2.png
Jennifer TraskOlana Brooch – Found ivory, rose & yellow gold, rose cut diamonds (« Unnatural Histories », 2007)

blog_trask_01.jpg
Jennifer TRASK – « Germinate » neckpiece created out of an assortment of found materials (often in the woods behind her home in upstate New York) : deer antlers, cow and ox bones, pigeon skull, teeth from a nutria (beaver-like animal), pre-ban ivory, plastic, steel, brass and five tiny hidden diamonds – at SOFA N.Y. 2010 (Ornamentum Gallery)

 

« What inspired you to make this piece?
I’ve been working on it along with the large wall installation (below) for the Dead or Alive exhibit at the Museum of Arts and Design (MAD Museum, 2010). Naturally, the work has been mingling and some of these are fragments from the larger piece. The ornament and growth are directional, circular if you look carefully at the neckpiece. The recycled materials also address the uncomfortable distance we have created from nature itself. The references are specific, biological and metaphoric.
Why bone?
I wanted to work with something elemental and bone serves three purposes: the concept, it relates on a visceral level to the body, and is easily sourced as remnants from hunting, or as found material.
How long did it take you to make?
It’s hard to say how long a single piece takes since I work on several projects at once and there is an organic evolution to the process. I gather materials and arrange them, and then rearrange endlessly, sometimes, until there is a natural flow to the design. When you start looking at growth patterns there are curious overlaps—nerve cells and capillaries to the way plants branch and vines twist, and so on.  » (interview on Wmagazine, « Treasure Hunt »)

COUP de COEUR !  Jennifer TRASK dans COUP DE COEUR Feb28_ornamentum_jennifer-trask_DSC_0137
Jennifer TRASK – Acanthus Neckpiece – antler, 17th century gilded frame, gold leaf, gold- 16 x 12 x 3″ – 2010

Necklace by Jennifer Trask par Dmitri Belyi
Jennifer TRASK – Acanthus Neckpiece (Photo by Dmitri Belyl)

http://comeunagazzaladra.files.wordpress.com/2010/01/jennifer_trask_04.jpg dans Gal. Ornamentum (US)
Jennifer TRASK - ‘Allegory’ Neckpiece (& detail)- Found & altered bone fragments, including antlers, deer jaw, jewelry, pre-ban ivory fragments, silver, 18K gold -2009 (« Embodiment series », 2009)

 dans Jennifer TRASK (US)
Jennifer TRASK - ‘Allegory’ Neckpiece (detail)

 dans MAD Museum (US)
Jennifer TRASK -Queen Anne’s Lace’ Brooch – Bone, sewing needles, silver rubies, resin- 2010

 dans organics
Jennifer TRASK -Cluster’ Brooch – Found and altered bone fragments, teeth, found jewelry, silver, diamond – 2010

 

07/03/2011

EXPO ‘A Bit of Clay on the Skin: New Ceramic Jewelry’ – MAD Museum, NY (US) – 15 Mars-4 Sept. 2011

L’exposition de Limoges part à new-York ! :-)
The Exhibition is traveling from Limoges, France, to New York, USA

(cf article  : «  EXPO ‘Un peu de terre sur la peau’ – FONDATION BERNARDAUD, Limoges (FR) – 16 juin-16 oct 2010« )

EXPO 'A Bit of Clay on the Skin: New Ceramic Jewelry' - MAD Museum, NY (US) - 15 Mars-4 Sept. 2011 dans ceramique 188041_152613144796629_7257687_n

A Bit of Clay on the Skin: New Ceramic Jewelry explores the manifold appeal of ceramics, especially porcelain, in jewelry. Organized by the Fondation d’Entreprise Bernardaud and curated by the renowned German-born goldsmith and jewelry artist Monika Brugger, the exhibition showcases the versatility and allure of the medium, which can be modeled or cast, used alone or with metal, wood, and stone, and vary in color and texture. Best known as the stuff of the luxurious and the mundane, of fine tableware and technical equipment, when used in jewelry, porcelain sparks the visual and physical sensations to become an object of desire.
The exhibition showcases the scope and ingenuity of the more than one hundred works on view and features the work of 18 cutting-edge jewelry artists, including creations by such notables as Peter Hoogeboom, Evert Nijland, Ted Noten (The Netherlands), Gésine Hackenberg (Germany), Marie Pendariès (France), and Shu-Lin Wu (Taiwan). While some make reference to traditional jewelry in materials and symbolism, others altogether redefine it in substance, form, and matter.
« Even though the Egyptians produced seal rings in faience, and the Greeks and Romans gilded terracotta to imitate gold, the use of ceramics in the fabrication of jewelry was abandoned centuries ago, » says curator Monika Brugger. « Today many artists, like those assembled in this show, are popularizing porcelain as a compelling material for jewelry. »
« Ceramic jewelry embodies the creative transformation of a humble Earth material by art and industry into a wearable object of great refinement and sensuality, » notes MAD’s Jewelry Curator Ursula Ilse-Neuman. « Exploring new currents in art jewelry is a vital part of the Museum’s mission, » she continues. « We are delighted to present these visually and intellectually engaging works to a New York audience. »

Marie PENDARIES (FR) 'la dot' - 28 pieces en porcelaine
Marie Pendaries (FR) ‘la dot’ – 28 pieces en porcelaine

THE FONDATION D’ENTREPRISE BERNARDAUD
Established in 2003 by Michel Bernardaud, the family-run company’s Chairman and CEO, the mission of the Fondation d’Entreprise Bernardaud is to promote a deeper public awareness of porcelain’s fascinating history and extraordinary qualities. The Fondation, located in Limoges, France, welcomes an international array of artists and designers who are invited to invent unexpected usages for porcelain. Through these innovative and technically challenging projects, the Fondation aims to give new value to a craft that favors the « wisdom of the hand. »

 

PETER HOOGEBOOMPeter Hoogeboom – ‘Spanish collar’ série ‘Handle with care’ – céramique argent 

BERNARDAUD
A family owned-and-operated company founded in 1863, Bernardaud is the premier manufacturer of Limoges porcelain. Deeply rooted in the history and activity of that region, the company is highly regarded for its artistic, technical and innovative prowess. Among French luxury brands it is a considered a trendsetter for objects that are characterized by original forms and stunning decorative embellishments, while globally the company is renowned for its commitment to the French traditions of impeccable craftsmanship, refinement, and creativity in the fabrication of porcelain objects. The vast range of its collections–tableware, jewelry and decorative interior objects—elegantly fuses design, art, and lifestyle.

A Bit of Clay on the Skin: New Ceramic Jewelry is made possible in part by the Mondriaan Foundation, Amsterdam, and the Curators Circle, a leadership Museum support group.Champagne for the opening reception graciously donated by La Caravelle.

Evert Nijland - collier 'Rococo' porcelaine, linTerhi Tolvanen - collier 'Zig ZAg' de la serie 'woodland' - porcelaine, argent
Evert Nijland – collier ‘Rococo’ porcelaine, lin
Terhi Tolvanen - collier ‘Zig ZAg’ de la serie ‘woodland’ – porcelaine, argent

Katja Prins - broche 'Inventarium' - argent porcelaine caoutchoucShu-Lin WU (Taiwan) - collier 'mokume' porcelaine
Katja Prins – broche ‘Inventarium’ – argent porcelaine caoutchouc
Shu-Lin WU (Taiwan) – collier ‘mokume’ porcelaine

 

MUSEUM OF ARTS AND DESIGN  (MAD Museum)
2, Columbus Circle
10019 New York, NY (USA)
T : +12122997777
info@madmuseum.org
collections.madmuseum.org