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17/03/2015

EXPO ‘Creativity for man’ – Creativity Oggetti, Torino (IT) – 12 mars-30 avril 2015

Creativity for man – 12 mars-30 avril 2015 – Torino (IT)

Creativity Oggetti presenta dal 12 Marzo al 30 Aprile
sei collezioni di gioielli realizzate ad hoc per conquistare il pubblico maschile.

Inaugura nella nuova sede torinese di Creativity Oggetti, eclettico spazio di Susanna Maffini riservato alle arti applicate e al gioiello d’autore, una piccola e suggestiva esposizione dedicata al pubblico maschile.

Creativity for man - 12 mars-30 avril 2015 - Torino (IT)

Gli artisti e designer coinvoltiAqto (Piero Acuto) – Isabelle BusnelLucilla Giovanninetti – Carlo A. Tramunto – Luca Tripaldi – Paola Volpi

Aqto lavora con l’alluminio trasformando in anelli, bracciali, collane e portachiavi oggetti d’uso comune. Spille in silicone anche di grandi dimensioni per Isabelle Busnel che re-interpreta il fazzoletto da taschino e il ferma cravatta. Lucilla Giovanninetti (Eandare) propone spille in tessuto irrigidito con resine. Nello stesso modo con cui uno scultore modelle l’argilla per plasmare un’opera, Carlo Antonio Tramunto realizza i suoi bracciali e collari che diventano vere e proprie sculture in miniatura. Paola Volpi crea anelli, ciondoli, gemelli in argento, dallo stampo di antichi bottoni di madreperla, mentre Luca Tripaldi prediligendo linee essenziali e l’uso del bianco e nero, mette in moto la creatività e la cura del dettaglio della sartoria teatrale, evidenziata dall’uso frequente di grafiche stampate con la tecnica della decalcomania.

Creativity for man -  Pin "Trovami", Eandare - Lucilla Giovanninetti Eandare / Lucilla Giovanninetti - Pin « Trovami » - feltro e viscosa irrigiditi da resine

 Pin "Trovami", Eandare - Lucilla GiovanninettiEandare / Lucilla Giovanninetti - Pin « Trovami » - feltro e viscosa irrigiditi da resine

Credo che il gioiello maschile, rispetto a quello femminile, dialoghi in maniera più sottile sia con chi lo indossa, sia con chi lo vede » racconta Lucilla Giovanninetti. « Spesso l’aspetto puramente decorativo, infatti, viene affiancato da valenze politiche, economiche, simboliche, o più semplicemente rappresentative. Da tempo disegno e sperimento possibili gioielli maschili. Per questo ho accolto con molto piacere l’invito da parte di Susanna Maffini di pensare a un gioiello maschile in totale libertà »

  Bracciali, AqtoAqto (Piero Acuto) -Bracciali

Creativity for man -  Spilla, Isabelle BusnelIsabelle Busnel -  Spilla (brooch)

Creativity-for-man - Isabelle Busnel Isabelle Busnel

Carlo Antonio Tramunto Carlo Antonio Tramunto

  Bracciale-scultura, Carlo Antonio Tramunto Carlo Antonio Tramunto – Bracciale-scultura

 

 

Creativity OggettiVia Carlo Alberto 40/f
10123  Torino, Italy
t. +39 011.8177864
susanna@creativityoggetti.it
designer@creativityoggetti.it

 

 

16/03/2015

After Identity Crisis: Ceci n’est pas “art jewellery” (2/4) by Ezra Satok-Wolman

Classé dans : Ezra SATOK-WOLMAN (CA),Reflexion,www Klimt02 — bijoucontemporain @ 21:39

« For real change to occur, action needs to take place. My intention with “Identity Crisis” was to drop a pebble into the water and hope that some of the ripples turned into waves. It is in that spirit that I am publishing this follow up essay.
(This is the second part of a text that will be published in 4 individual texts. Read the previous article: Part 1 ) »

After Identity Crisis: Ceci n’est pas “art jewellery” (2/4).

There are galleries, fairs, exhibitions, university programs, museum collections and stacks of books dedicated to art jewellery.  Art jewellery has gone global.  So how can art jewellery be dead?  The reality is art jewellery isn’t dead, but it has become unrecognizable.  One of the biggest problems that I see today is that art jewellery has become an “umbrella term,” used to refer to a number of different types of jewellery and philosophies about jewellery that collectively create a fairly schizophrenic personality.  It might be more appropriate to suggest that art jewellery has multiple personalities and may at times present itself as craft jewellery, alternative jewellery, or small scale conceptual art (that may or may not function as jewellery at all).

  • One of the biggest problems that I see today is that art jewellery has become an “umbrella term,” used to refer to a number of different types of jewellery and philosophies about jewellery that collectively create a fairly schizophrenic personality

Art jewellery should be more successful today than it has ever been, yet we have continued to slump even further into decline as the field has grown and as time has passed.  Our tendency has been to look for external reasons for our struggles, but I believe it is time we accept that the problems lie within what art jewellery has come to be, rather than factors that have impacted it.  We can no longer blame an unstable economy for the lack of art jewellery sales because the jewellery market in general is booming.  In a recent article about the Birmingham School of Jewellery’s 125th anniversary, Professional Jeweller Magazine1 reported that the UK has seen consistent growth in the jewellery and watch industry since 2009 valuing it today at £5 billion annually.  Why then has art jewellery struggled so terribly?  The contemporary art world is also booming, and it shouldn’t be so crazy to think that art jewellery should be enjoying similar success.  I can’t help but think that the problem must lie within the realm of art jewellery itself because things seem to be fine in the outside world.

  • The extremist approach to art jewellery has guided artists to become consumed with trying to reinvent jewellery, rather than focus on making jewellery art that other people will both react to and want to wear

The problems that have arisen regarding art jewellery’s sustainability may have more to do with issues that are not fundamentally relevant to jewellery at all, but rather relate to radical ideologies about art jewellery that have heavily influenced trends within the field.  We have allowed extremism and dogmatism to take the reigns and now find ourselves asking how we got here.  It is not that people don’t want to buy art jewellery, but perhaps more likely that people don’t want to buy this art jewellery.  The extremist approach to art jewellery has guided artists to become consumed with trying to reinvent jewellery, rather than focus on making jewellery art that other people will both react to and want to wear.  Looking at the full spectrum of what is produced today under the guise of art jewellery might have you questioning how many artists are capable of actually producing good functional jewellery.  Experimentation seems to take precedence over technique. “Narratives” and “concept” have become far more important than the end result.  Craftsmanship and attention to detail seem to be a thing of the past, and too much of either could have people telling you that you’re not an artist at all.  Ted Noten recently spoke about being criticized for this as an art student in a recent interview with The New York Times2 and was quoted saying; “if you want to be an artist you should have the tools and skills to make something.  If you want to come up with concepts, be a writer.”

While I am a dedicated supporter of art jewellery in all forms, the field could certainly benefit from some distinctions being made between the kinds of art jewellery being produced right now.   As art jewellery has grown and developed, a number of facets have taken shape and the term art jewellery has come to represent a diverse range of things, including at times costume, multi-media installations and performance art.  It may be unfair to say that art jewellery in general has failed or has become irrelevant, because some facets are doing much better than others.  There are certain kinds of art jewellery that will always appeal to the market better than others.  There are tremendous differences between the kind of customer that is looking for a highly conceptual piece of “jewellery art” for their private collection, and the customer that is looking for a piece of art jewellery to wear.  I am fairly confident that the number of customers looking to purchase well made art jewellery that can be worn will always outnumber those looking to buy unwearable or overly conceptual pieces that can not be worn.  For the purposes of clear communication and good marketing, it might not be such a bad idea to represent this kind of highly conceptual work separately altogether.  While there may be a place for conceptual jewellery within the spectrum of art jewellery, to have expectations that it will have success on its own commercially may still be unrealistic.

Beyond highly conceptual jewellery, the need to distinguish between art jewellery and craft jewellery is also crucial.  For too long we have allowed serial and edition craft work to masquerade as art jewellery.  Too many makers have resorted to focussing on multiple “editions” or serial work, which may appeal to requests from galleries for “new collections,” but often devalues the pieces overall.   As more makers attend fairs to exhibit and sell their work, art jewellery has been altered to fit the needs of the wholesale format.  Once again this is very reminiscent of craft jewellery, as artists look for ways to produce inexpensive multiples and work within margins.  The market is changing for galleries too, many of which are now spending a good amount of time in the field attending fairs themselves.  Contemporary art and design fairs have become hotbeds of activity for both artists and galleries, but it’s still too soon to say what kind of support will be cultivated in the form of new followers and collectors.

  •  Ultimately it is the audience or market that determines the value of the art we make.  We can only sell our pieces for what people are willing to pay, if they are willing to pay anything at all. 

I often hear people proclaiming that more art jewellery isn’t purchased because the audience isn’t educated, and doesn’t understand the value of what they are looking at.  I happen to disagree with this statement and have found quite the opposite in my experience.  People who have an interest in art jewellery tend to be quite educated.  They also tend to have both an understanding of, and appreciation for art and craftsmanship.  Ultimately it is the audience or market that determines the value of the art we make.  We can only sell our pieces for what people are willing to pay, if they are willing to pay anything at all.  Regardless of how educated the audience is or isn’t, they directly contribute to the valuation and commercial success or failure of an artist’s work, more so than galleries do.  You can’t fake craftsmanship, and it’s something that people have simply come to expect when it comes to jewellery whether you work in gold, plastic, paper or textile.

  • It may be fair to say that there is currently a lot of good craft jewellery and conceptual art being made by people who call themselves jewellery artists.  But calling something art jewellery and something actually being art jewellery are two very different things.

Art jewellery has changed dramatically over the last decade.  When I think back to what art jewellery was about when I first became interested in it, I remember a vastly different landscape.  Fundamentally speaking, art jewellery was about artists making jewellery.  The art jewellery movement began when artists who were highly skilled jewellery makers, started exploring different approaches to jewellery making that were outside the traditional boundaries of conventional jewellery. These artists experimented with various kinds of materials, forms, and techniques, developing a field that at the time was quite radical.  Art jewellery was about more than stringing together bits and pieces, or assembling collections of found objects.  Using alternative materials, casual construction, and giving the piece a socio-political title was not enough to qualify something as art jewellery.  It may be fair to say that there is currently a lot of good craft jewellery and conceptual art being made by people who call themselves jewellery artists.  But calling something art jewellery and something actually being art jewellery are two very different things.

  • Virtual success is measured by social media ratings which in turn has only fed our need for instant gratification.  In a “fast food” like manner we are constantly bombarded with content, giving us little time to digest between servings.

Before the internet became a mainstream resource and tool for communication, the information available about art jewellery was not only limited, but carefully curated as well.  “Information” came in the form of physical exhibitions, books and magazines.  There were no websites or blogs and therefore information was available periodically and for the most part regionally.  Today we each have our own websites or social media “channels,” and information is made available in real-time.  New work is “published” daily and essentially with little to no filter.  The internet has become the ultimate platform for the work we produce, providing artists with the ability to virtually exhibit and sell their work to a global marketplace.  Virtual success is measured by social media ratings which in turn has only fed our need for instant gratification.  In a “fast food” like manner we are constantly bombarded with content, giving us little time to digest between servings.

The art jewellery spectrum has been stretched beyond imagination.  Sometimes it seems as though artists are merely competing to see who can take jewellery to the furthest points of abstraction, physically and philosophically, while others compete to see who can use or repurpose the most obscure materials or objects in a quest to create the “nouvo-collage” on a pin or a string.  This is a complete departure from what art jewellery is intended to be, and a departure that I attribute in part to extremism.  Extremism has convinced students year after year that in order to succeed as a jewellery artist, they must reinvent art jewellery  and the materials they use to create it.  Extremism has replaced skill and technique with ego and shock value.  While I have seen some very interesting and thought provoking things arise from this extremist approach to art jewellery over the years, I would venture to say that it is work of the “extremist art jeweller” that could be pronounced dead rather than art jewellery in general.  If you look at the ideologies at either end of the “art jewellery spectrum,” what you will find are extreme interpretations of jewellery that may not have much potential for commercial success.

In my opinion, if you remove the craft jewellery, alternative jewellery, and the extreme conceptual jewellery from the mix, there really isn’t a tremendous amount of art jewellery being produced, and much of it probably does quite well in terms of sales.  The “art jewellery umbrella” currently covers a lot of work by default that quite frankly would be more accurately described as something else.  A good example of this dynamic exists at Sieraad Art Fair, the annual event in Amsterdam dedicated to art jewellery.  It was my experience at Sieraad that while there was some art jewellery at the fair, the work was primarily a mix of craft jewellery, alternative jewellery and highly conceptual jewellery.  I believe  Ward Schriver was making the same declaration in his review of the 2013 edition of the fair for Art Jewelry Forum,3 in which he concluded by saying; “If you are keen on seeing, and possibly buying, a great diversity of affordable, “modern” jewelry, you’ll have a field day at Sieraad.”

  • Many artists no longer think enough about who or if anyone will ever wear their jewellery, which has led to a complete disconnect with the wearer

Today’s iteration of art jewellery has been diluted.  Our standards have simply been watered down. Craftsmanship, functionality, and synthesis of concept and form are no longer important when assessing the success or failure of a piece. Photographs and artist’s statements have become more valuable currency than the objects themselves, often obscuring the true nature of the pieces they document, or how well or poorly they are made. The foundation skills necessary for making jewellery  are no longer required to make art jewellery, or so it would seem.  Some groups will tell you that a piece of art jewellery need not function as jewellery at all, as long as the intention exists.  Many artists no longer think enough about who or if anyone will ever wear their jewellery, which has led to a complete disconnect with the wearer.  Artists no longer produce jewellery for people to wear, but rather to build portfolios and develop their own artistic identities.  The wearer or end user has been erased from the equation, and herein lies another one of our critical dilemmas.  Jewellery is something that people need to have a very personal and individual connection with, much more so than art which is generally intended for a broader public audience.  Finding a happy medium can often be the biggest challenge when making art jewellery and must at least begin with a desire to do so.

1 Professional Jeweller – Jan 23, 2015, by Sarah Louise Jordan
http://www.professionaljeweller.com/article-15570-why-birmingham-is-boosting-the-jewellery-industry/

The New York Times – Dec 4, 2014, by Nina Siegal
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/05/style/international/ted-noten-jewelry-artist-brings-macabre-art-to-miami.html?_r=1

3 Art Jewelry Forum – Dec 23, 2013, by Ward Schriver
http://www.artjewelryforum.org/conference-fair-reviews/the-sieraad-fair-in-amsterdam

published by Klimt02

After Identity Crisis: Introduction (1/4) by Ezra Satok-Wolman

Classé dans : Ezra SATOK-WOLMAN (CA),Reflexion,www Klimt02 — bijoucontemporain @ 21:31

« For real change to occur, action needs to take place. My intention with “Identity Crisis” was to drop a pebble into the water and hope that some of the ripples turned into waves. It is in that spirit that I am publishing this follow up essay. »

 After Identity Crisis: Introduction (1/4).Ezra Satok-Wolman

Art Jewellery is Dead.”  That’s how all of this began.  With an absurd statement, that after careful scrutiny, may have been nothing more than a wakeup call from someone who really knows what this movement is supposed to be all about.  In fact, what has transpired is nothing more than a frantic call for the defibrillator, and a huge gasp for air.  Resuscitation alone is not enough however.  Art Jewellery is in need of a transfusion and an injection of new fresh blood.  Art Jewellery isn’t dead; it is hiding from its own “identity.”  For fear that it looks in the mirror only to realize that it still has a tremendous amount of growing up to do.  The Dogmas and narrow minded curating of Art Jewellery over the last decade or more have led us to question whether we even have a future as a field.

Over the years I have developed a network of friends and colleagues in the Americas, Europe, and Asia who will all tell you that Art Jewellery is alive and well.  It might not be what you think it is anymore, but a new “identity” is being revealed.  It will be immediately recognizable and you won’t have to ask yourself “is that Art Jewellery?”  Real Art Jewellery slaps you in the face. It makes you feel something.  You might find yourself proclaiming “I have to have that” before you’ve even had time to think, or ask how much it costs.  Anyone who has ever bought a piece of Art Jewellery knows this feeling.  It is an indescribable feeling.  It is amazement that you can affix to your body and show off to the world as your latest discovery.  Ask yourself when the last time you experienced this was and you will soon realize how scarce real Art Jewellery has become.  That is one of the biggest problems we face with Art Jewellery today.

We have come so far, and yet perhaps we have only scratched the surface.  Why stop here?  Things got difficult, and now we’re all just supposed to pack it in?  No way.  Its time to clean house and get things in order.  But if we want to ensure the survival of this movement, we must ensure that our mission statement is clear, that we have realistic goals, and that we celebrate excellence, not mediocrity.  As long as artists create jewellery, an art jewellery movement will exist.  It is entirely up to us however, to determine how successful and prolific we will be as a field.

In October, 2014 I travelled to China where I was invited to serve as one of the art directors for the Shanghai Jewellery Art Exhibition at Shanghai Design Week. I was also invited to present a lecture at Design Week, and asked to specifically speak about finding a balance between artistic expression and commercial success. That lecture was presented a second time to the jewellery department at Wuhan University of Engineering Sciences several days later. The lectures, as well as this essay, have been developed from the notes that I will share with you over the course of this text.  We will look back at the more successful periods that Art Jewellery has enjoyed and try to determine what has changed.  We will also look at how a redivision of the branches of Art Jewellery may help us more accurately understand and communicate with our target markets.

While I certainly don’t claim to have all the answers, I am prepared to share my thoughts and feelings on these subjects in an effort to keep a healthy dialogue flowing.  My end goal is to ensure the survival and success of the field we all work within, and my hope is that we all benefit from reviving this important movement.  I received an overwhelmingly positive response to my last essay “Identity Crisis,”which was a call to action, in an effort to change things before its too late.  But it doesn’t just end with essays, declarations and manifestos.

For real change to occur, action needs to take place.  My intention with “Identity Crisis” was to drop a pebble into the water and hope that some of the ripples turned into waves.  It is in that spirit that I am publishing this follow up essay.

Art Jewellery is Dead.”  That’s how all of this began.  With an absurd statement, that after careful scrutiny, may have been nothing more than a wakeup call from someone who really knows what this movement is supposed to be all about.  In fact, what has transpired is nothing more than a frantic call for the defibrillator, and a huge gasp for air.  Resuscitation alone is not enough however.  Art Jewellery is in need of a transfusion and an injection of new fresh blood.  Art Jewellery isn’t dead; it is hiding from its own “identity.”  For fear that it looks in the mirror only to realize that it still has a tremendous amount of growing up to do.  The Dogmas and narrow minded curating of Art Jewellery over the last decade or more have led us to question whether we even have a future as a field.

Over the years I have developed a network of friends and colleagues in the Americas, Europe, and Asia who will all tell you that Art Jewellery is alive and well.  It might not be what you think it is anymore, but a new “identity” is being revealed.  It will be immediately recognizable and you won’t have to ask yourself “is that Art Jewellery?”  Real Art Jewellery slaps you in the face. It makes you feel something.  You might find yourself proclaiming “I have to have that” before you’ve even had time to think, or ask how much it costs.  Anyone who has ever bought a piece of Art Jewellery knows this feeling.  It is an indescribable feeling.  It is amazement that you can affix to your body and show off to the world as your latest discovery.  Ask yourself when the last time you experienced this was and you will soon realize how scarce real Art Jewellery has become.  That is one of the biggest problems we face with Art Jewellery today.

We have come so far, and yet perhaps we have only scratched the surface.  Why stop here?  Things got difficult, and now we’re all just supposed to pack it in?  No way.  Its time to clean house and get things in order.  But if we want to ensure the survival of this movement, we must ensure that our mission statement is clear, that we have realistic goals, and that we celebrate excellence, not mediocrity.  As long as artists create jewellery, an art jewellery movement will exist.  It is entirely up to us however, to determine how successful and prolific we will be as a field.

In October, 2014 I travelled to China where I was invited to serve as one of the art directors for the Shanghai Jewellery Art Exhibition at Shanghai Design Week. I was also invited to present a lecture at Design Week, and asked to specifically speak about finding a balance between artistic expression and commercial success. That lecture was presented a second time to the jewellery department at Wuhan University of Engineering Sciences several days later. The lectures, as well as this essay, have been developed from the notes that I will share with you over the course of this text.  We will look back at the more successful periods that Art Jewellery has enjoyed and try to determine what has changed.  We will also look at how a redivision of the branches of Art Jewellery may help us more accurately understand and communicate with our target markets.

While I certainly don’t claim to have all the answers, I am prepared to share my thoughts and feelings on these subjects in an effort to keep a healthy dialogue flowing.  My end goal is to ensure the survival and success of the field we all work within, and my hope is that we all benefit from reviving this important movement.  I received an overwhelmingly positive response to my last essay “Identity Crisis,”which was a call to action, in an effort to change things before its too late.  But it doesn’t just end with essays, declarations and manifestos.

For real change to occur, action needs to take place.  My intention with “Identity Crisis” was to drop a pebble into the water and hope that some of the ripples turned into waves.  It is in that spirit that I am publishing this follow up essay.

Art Jewellery is Dead.”  That’s how all of this began.  With an absurd statement, that after careful scrutiny, may have been nothing more than a wakeup call from someone who really knows what this movement is supposed to be all about.  In fact, what has transpired is nothing more than a frantic call for the defibrillator, and a huge gasp for air.  Resuscitation alone is not enough however.  Art Jewellery is in need of a transfusion and an injection of new fresh blood.  Art Jewellery isn’t dead; it is hiding from its own “identity.”  For fear that it looks in the mirror only to realize that it still has a tremendous amount of growing up to do.  The Dogmas and narrow minded curating of Art Jewellery over the last decade or more have led us to question whether we even have a future as a field.

Over the years I have developed a network of friends and colleagues in the Americas, Europe, and Asia who will all tell you that Art Jewellery is alive and well.  It might not be what you think it is anymore, but a new “identity” is being revealed.  It will be immediately recognizable and you won’t have to ask yourself “is that Art Jewellery?”  Real Art Jewellery slaps you in the face. It makes you feel something.  You might find yourself proclaiming “I have to have that” before you’ve even had time to think, or ask how much it costs.  Anyone who has ever bought a piece of Art Jewellery knows this feeling.  It is an indescribable feeling.  It is amazement that you can affix to your body and show off to the world as your latest discovery.  Ask yourself when the last time you experienced this was and you will soon realize how scarce real Art Jewellery has become.  That is one of the biggest problems we face with Art Jewellery today.

We have come so far, and yet perhaps we have only scratched the surface.  Why stop here?  Things got difficult, and now we’re all just supposed to pack it in?  No way.  Its time to clean house and get things in order.  But if we want to ensure the survival of this movement, we must ensure that our mission statement is clear, that we have realistic goals, and that we celebrate excellence, not mediocrity.  As long as artists create jewellery, an art jewellery movement will exist.  It is entirely up to us however, to determine how successful and prolific we will be as a field.

In October, 2014 I travelled to China where I was invited to serve as one of the art directors for the Shanghai Jewellery Art Exhibition at Shanghai Design Week. I was also invited to present a lecture at Design Week, and asked to specifically speak about finding a balance between artistic expression and commercial success. That lecture was presented a second time to the jewellery department at Wuhan University of Engineering Sciences several days later. The lectures, as well as this essay, have been developed from the notes that I will share with you over the course of this text.  We will look back at the more successful periods that Art Jewellery has enjoyed and try to determine what has changed.  We will also look at how a redivision of the branches of Art Jewellery may help us more accurately understand and communicate with our target markets.

While I certainly don’t claim to have all the answers, I am prepared to share my thoughts and feelings on these subjects in an effort to keep a healthy dialogue flowing.  My end goal is to ensure the survival and success of the field we all work within, and my hope is that we all benefit from reviving this important movement.  I received an overwhelmingly positive response to my last essay “Identity Crisis,”which was a call to action, in an effort to change things before its too late.  But it doesn’t just end with essays, declarations and manifestos.

For real change to occur, action needs to take place.  My intention with “Identity Crisis” was to drop a pebble into the water and hope that some of the ripples turned into waves.  It is in that spirit that I am publishing this follow up essay.

Forthcoming topics will include:

  •  What is Art Jewellery?
  •  The Art Jewellery “Umbrella”
  •  Extremism
  •  Pole Shift
  •  The dangers of following trends
  •  Shock value
  •  Overpopulation and Overgrowth
  •   »The Golden Standard,” tarnished or simply abandoned?

 

published by Klimt02

15/03/2015

TALENTE 2015 AWARD : & the WINNER is ……………

[Talente-Award presentation 2015 : 14 March 2015  16:30, Halle B1 Main stage of IHM (Internationalen Handwerksmesse Munich)]

….. and the winner is Jing Yang (CN/DE) from  Akademie der Bildenden Künste (ADBK)

With her vases pendants, the jewelry designer Jing Yang explores and experiments with the gender-specific stereotypes in her home country China. By dissecting vase-shaped elements and arranging the individual parts in a distinctive manner, she plays with formal analyses reminiscent of Concrete Art. (ArtAurea)

Jing Yang  - Pendant: Ich bin keine Vase, 2014 Brass, cotton band 15 x 10 x 76 cm Jing Yang  -  Necklace Ich bin keine Vase. Necklace, brass, cotton cord, 15 × 10 × 76 cm

« I’m not a Vase »

( Exhibition of Jing Yang in the Academy Gallery, Munich, during SCHMUCK 2015 - 11 – 22 march 2015)

« « I’m not a vase. »
The sentence has two meanings. « I’m not a vase, I’m jewelery » which is a
The other interpretation comes from my home. In many cultures, bringing the silhouette and features a vase in connection with a woman. In China it is called pretty but stupid women « vase » – nice but hollow.
My work group « I am not a Vase » has several layers of meaning.
As jewelry is also the vase an object that moves between useful and artistic object.
I’m interested in the artistic jewelry. Even my vases have no function anymore – they are cut into rings and the fragments are then strung on a string and creates a neck piece of jewelry.
Stacked the vase can recognize. The result is a fragile entity. My vases can always decompose and their meaning changes again. You mean to say, « I will not be a vase, I have something to say! »
Also think about the opposite worthwhile. « I am a Vase » says: « I am beautiful ». » (adbkAcademy Gallery)

Jing Yang Pendant: Ich bin keine Vase, 2014 - TALENTE 2015 WINNER Brass, cotton band 15 x 10 x 76 cmJing Yang Pendant: Ich bin keine Vase, 2014 – Brass, cotton band 15 x 10 x 76 cm

14/03/2015

Decouverte : Lynn BATCHELDER, selected for TALENTE 2015

Classé dans : DECOUVERTE,Lynn BATCHELDER (US),SUNY New Paltz (US),TALENTE,USA — bijoucontemporain @ 0:06

 Lynn BATCHELDER

MFA in Metal at State University New Paltz at New York (2013 MFA Thesis)
BFA in Metals/Jewelry Western Michigan University

….. and she is selected for TALENTE 2015

[Talente-Award presentation 2015 : 14 March 2015  16:30, Halle B1 Main stage of IHM (Internationalen Handwerksmesse Munich)]

« I like the idea of making something that is nothing in particular. everyone sees something in everything– in a shape, in a line, in a color– it is our way of identifying or making sense of what we see. thus, non-things – they could be something, but guess what, they aren’t. »

LYNN BATCHELDERLynn Batchelder – SUNY (State University of New York), New Paltz, USA MFA 2013 – necklace, Sawing/Drawing, 2013, steel

lynn batchelder Fictions :   (BACK detail) steel, silver solderLynn Batchelder Reconstructions Brooch  (BACK detail) steel, silver solder

Lynn Batchelder  - Sawing/Drawing (Brooch)  - steel - 2013Lynn Batchelder  – Sawing/Drawing (Brooch)  – steel – 2013

 Lynn Batchelder  - Reconstructions (Chain) - 2013 steel Lynn Batchelder  – Reconstructions (Chain) – 2013 steel

Lynn Batchelder "non-things" - copper, silver, enamel, thread - & back detailLynn Batchelder « non-things » 2009 – copper, silver, enamel, thread – & back detail

Lynn BatchelderLynn Batchelder copper, paint, thread

Lynn Batchelder  silver, maple, house paintLynn Batchelder  (detail of back)

Lynn Batchelder  silver, maple, house paint 1 detail of back

Lynn-Batchelder- non-things - faux leather, threadLynn Batchelder – non-things – faux leather, thread

 

13/03/2015

EXPO ‘Territoires de l’Innovation’ – INMA, Paris (FR) – 10 Mars-31 Aout 2015

Territoires de l’Innovation, galerie de l’Institut National des Métiers d’Art  (Viaduc des Arts, 23 av. Daumesnil 75012 Paris)

 "Territoires de l'Innovation", 10/03 - 31/08/2015,

A l’occasion des

Journées Européennes des Métiers d’Art  (27-28 et 29 Mars) :

Métiers d’art et innovation vous semblent a priori incompatibles? Venez découvrir les dernières créations des artisans d’art au sein de la galerie de l’INMA ! L’exposition Territoires de l’Innovation présente cette capacité qu’ont les métiers d’art à se renouveler. Les professionnels détournent les matières comme Sébastien Carré et ses bijoux en pellicule photographique ou encore le bois gonflable et retro-éclairé des ébénistes d’ARCA. Quant à Luce Couillet, elle repousse les limites de la création textile en imaginant un tissage de bois. Penser différemment les espaces avec l’Ecritoire Plug-In de Pierre Mandile, mi-paravent mi-écritoire.
S’adapter aux avancées technologiques, c’est aussi les utiliser pour mettre au point de nouveaux procédés comme Célia Pascaud qui s’aide de Google Earth pour reproduire à l’échelle une chaine de montagne en verre.
Faire la liaison entre innovation et patrimoine, c’est cette caractéristique que met lumière l’exposition Territoires de l’Innovation. Présenter des artisans qui réinventent les métiers d’art comme Lucas de Staël et ses montures de lunettes en acier, pierre et cuir. Sa dernière création : Vivarium, une monture en peau d’iguane.
Repousser les limites et les capacités des objets du quotidien comme Renaud Gruss et le Coruss. Cette fibre synthétique remplace le crin de cheval classique que l’on retrouve sur les archets sans ses inconvénients. Le vélo Alérion combine parfaitement cette double nature, sculpture fonctionnelle, il prend des allures d’aigle sous les doigts du Meilleur Ouvrier de France en sculpture sur bois, Charles Boulnois et de Keim Éditions.
Pas moins d’une quinzaine de pièces venues de toute la France seront exposées à la galerie de l’INMA, et ce, jusque fin août.

Sébastien Carré - bracelet Le Réveil de Dunn © Milo Lee PhotographySébastien Carré – bracelet  »Le Reveil de Dunn » © Milo Lee Photography

« Les bijoux de Sébastien Carré racontent une histoire, celle de la poésie du corps. Un récit parfois douloureux mais cathartique. En s’inspirant des étapes de l’acceptation de la maladie (qui sont similaires à celles du Deuil décrites par Elisabeth Kübler Ross),  « Inflammation Noire » représente la 4ème  phase, celle de la dépression. Chaque élément de cette création est porteur de symbole, le matériau principal utilisé est de la pellicule de film qui provient du cinéma où le jeune bijoutier se rendait étant enfant. Le film employé (« Le goût des Autres » – d’Agnès Jaoui) permet d’évoquer le problème de communication avec l’entourage.

La pellicule de film c’est le souvenir, ou comment fixer l’instant, se remémorer. Inflammation Noire est la représentation de ce souvenir d’avant la maladie. En voulant jouer sur l’ambivalence, Sébastien Carré a imaginé un collier à plusieurs facettes. D’un côté il peut être doux et hypnotisant, de l’autre piquant et douloureux comme peuvent l’être les souvenirs. L’idée étant de créer un poids sur les épaules par un objet qui au contraire serait très léger.
Le « Le Reveil de Dunn » est un bracelet qui fait également la part belle aux symboles. A l’heure de la virtualité, Sébastien Carré nous entraine dans un monde sensoriel. Afin de réveiller notre corporalité, il pousse le spectateur à se confronter également à des sensations désagréables, gênantes. Mais ce ne sont que des sensations transitoires. Le jeune bijoutier nous apprend à apprécier les choses qui nous entourent grâce au Réveil de DUNN. Une fois enfilé et que la sensation désagréable s’est évaporée, le bracelet se fait doux et agréable, comme une deuxième peau.« 

Sebastien Carré 'Inflammation noire', 2014 - pellicule de film, coton, laine & perlesSebastien Carré ‘Inflammation noire’, 2014 – pellicule de film, coton, laine & perles

 

galerie de l’Institut National des Métiers d’Art (INMA)
Viaduc des Arts
23 av. Daumesnil
75012 Paris
ouvert de 11h à 19h
horaires d’ouverture le reste du temps (en dehors des journées Européennes des métiers d’art) du lundi au vendredi de 10h à 13h et de 14h à 18h.

http://www.institut-metiersdart.org/

tel 01 55 78 85 85

EXPO ‘BRITAIN 2015′ – Galerie Elsa Vanier, Paris (FR) – 21 mars-6 mai 2015

BRITAIN 2015Galerie Elsa Vanier

Vernissage le 20 mars 2015 en présence des créateurs.

 Exposition Britain 2015

Après le succès de l’exposition « un printemps anglais » en 2013, la galerie hisse à nouveau le pavillon britannique en 2015. Trois nouveaux créateurs viennent enrichir la sélection qui inclura également les créations les plus récentes de ceux qui avaient marqué la première édition.
Le souhait réitéré de la galerie d’illustrer la diversité des styles de l’art du bijou d’Outre-Manche anime cette exposition qui met en avant 9 talents très différents.
Jeux entre l’écriture et l’objet, esprit du vent sur des lames de titane, ode à la nature, appel au respect de la planète ou encore hommage aux cristaux et pièces architecturées, les bijoux exposés sont autant d’inspirations singulières et de savoir-faire variés. Les créateurs, souvent primés et de renommée internationale, proposent tout autant de pièces « rock » ou « gothiques » que des bijoux précieux à l’originalité discrète. Les métaux vont des plus classiques, or 18cts, platine ou argent massif, aux métaux d’avant-garde comme le titane et le palladium, un métal gris de la famille du platine encore peu travaillé en France. 
Cette exposition se tient sous le regard bienveillant de la société des orfèvres britanniques. Créée par la charte royale en 1327, cette institution garantit la qualité (c’est à dire le titre) des métaux précieux utilisés en joaillerie et orfèvrerie au Royaume-Uni. Son rôle s’étend, entre autres, par le biais de commandes de pièces d’exception, l’organisation de concours et d’expositions.

Créateurs participant à l’exposition : Jonathan BoydJacqueline CullenJo Hayes-Ward — Sarrah Herriot — Ornella Iannuzzi Josef KoppmannKayo SaitoRie Taniguchi Heather Woof.

Kayo Saito - Dew Brooch - 18ct gold, akoya pearlsKayo Saito - Dew Brooch – 18ct gold, akoya pearls

 Josef Koppmann Josef Koppmann Earrings with boulder opals set in 24ct gold and silver

Rie Taniguchi - Broche “My horn is no medecine” , argent massif, émailRie Taniguchi - Broche « Rhino Head: My horn is no medicine »- 44×39×10mmm- silver, enamel paint, stainless steel pin- photo by Joël Degen

Jacqueline Cullen - whitby jet braceletJacqueline Cullen – whitby jet bracelet

Jacqueline Cullen - whitby jet jewelryJacqueline Cullen – whitby jet jewelry

Jonathan Boyd - Bracelet jonc "an endless rant on craft".Jonathan Boyd – Bracelet jonc « an endless rant on craft ».

"BRITAIN 2015" - Galerie Elsa Vanier, - Broche Windswept by Heather Woof Heather Woof – Broche Windswept 

 "Windswept" brooch  from Heather Woof « Windswept » brooch  from Heather Woof

 Heather Woof - Détail de collier "Slinky necklace" Heather Woof – Détail de collier « Slinky necklace »

 

 

 Galerie Elsa Vanier
7 rue du Pré aux Clercs,
75007 PARIS
+33 (0)1 47 03 05 00

 

12/03/2015

During SCHMUCK 2015 – EXPO ‘Oscure Sacrifices II’ – 3stations, Munich (DEà 12-15 Mars 2015

Opening Thursday, 12. March 2015  15-19 h / 3stations

  »Oscure Sacrifices II«  , Jorge Manilla  

Next Thursday is the opening of my exhibition Oscure Sacrifices II at the International Schmuck week in München, Germany
This year my guest artist are Dimitar Stankov and Jonathan Hens.
I see you there!!!

Oscure Sacrifice – Jorge Manilla,
Schmuck Week
The first part of this Exhibition has happen in Gothenburg City last January 2015.
Presenting the first part of a visual conversation I confronted works and meanings.
The emotional element which gives an obsessive value to communal existence is death.”  George Bataille
In 2010, I  began to work on my series “Only Memories”and “Dust of a Broken Love”, which were inspired by the deepest feelings and fears that we usually avoid, I tried to show with this work the moral and corporeal anatomy of the human soul. Since then, I’ve developed series in which I explore the darker side of human beings. With series like “Pain”, “Melancholia”, “Contemporary Savagery” and “Morbid Moves” .
I’ve researched  and reflected on  topics such as death, life, love, feelings, emotions in both the
psychological and physical aspects of people.
With “Oscure Sacrifice” ,  I seek  to confront  elements of  my previous work with a more positive human outlook. Preserving the mystery and abstractness of the dark side, I want to create new  forms that  originate  a feeling of hope. Shapes and material serve as translators of my thoughts, in my creative process through materials I strive to penetrate in the dark side of the society we live in and then represent an idealized – less  negative image of a society that in the last years has produced mass murders, not only physical but emotional and intellectual. My latest pieces are images born out of the dream of darkness, of hope or solely my instinct.
Jorge Manilla
Sacrifices II
Oscure Sacrifices II (statement by Jorge Manilla)
During the last four years I ve been researching and reflecting on topics as death life love feelings and emotion,in both the psychological and physical aspects of human beings.
Comunicating emotions is not easy people don’t Like to discuss them ans very often my works represents just that.
With my pieces I like to relate to the hidden the secretive, the unknown, and with this to create a mysterious air. My work keep things bottled up, hidden from the world.
I want to make pieces that make people think.
I dont like or want to make easy beautiful work, I want people to feel something when they re in in front of my work. Whether they like or deslike. It doesn’t matter as long as I , leave them thinking And feeling . I would like people to never forget that we are still alive And there is always something positive behind every Black cloud.
Jorge Manilla - Sacrifices II
Jorge Manilla new work
Jorge Manilla Sacrifices II Jorge Manilla - Sacrifices II
Jorge Manilla
Jorge Manilla - ring - obscures sacrifices II
Jorge Manilla - ring – obscures sacrifices II
« Oscure Sacrifices I -
By creating  jewellery Jorge Manilla investigates his environment - religion, emotions, relationships and the meaning of life. 
Manilla has a professional background as a boxer and butcher. He observes violence and cruelty pragmatic and objective and his jewellery often express a brutal rawness – The last years the artist  re discovered his love for the black color, wich has been a constant in his life.
And since 2010 Manilla translate the rawness of life in materials…
For Jorge black relates to the hidden, the secretive and the unknown, and as a result it creates an air of mystery. It keeps things bottled up inside, hidden from the world.
With his dark forms and shapes he creates a barrier between the meanings of the objects and the outside world.
Black implies self-control and discipline, independence and a strong will, and giving an impression of authority and power.
Manilla think that black is the end, but the end always implies a new beginning. 
When the light appears, black becomes white, the color of new beginnings
The work of Jorge are beautiful punches that hit the viewer in solar plexus. » By Karin Roy Anderson
THE NEWBORN by Dimitar Stankov/ OSCURE SACRIFICES by Jorge Manilla/ X10IONS OF THE TRIBE by Jonathan HensTHE NEWBORN by Dimitar Stankov/ OSCURE SACRIFICES by Jorge Manilla/ X10IONS OF THE TRIBE by Jonathan Hens

 

 

3stations
Welsertrasse 11 UG
81373 Munich
Do.15-19 h, Fr./Sa.10-18 h, So. 10-14 h
www.3stations.de

 

 

11/03/2015

During SCHMUCK 2015 – EXPO ‘Trophies / In the Reign of Coyote’ – Deutsches Jagd- Und Fischereimuseum, Munich (DE)- 11-16 Mars 2015

Inauguration 12 Mars 2015 18-20 h/ Deutsches Jagd- Und Fischereimuseum

Trophies // In the Reign of Coyote.
TROPHIES // IN THE REIGN OF COYOTE
with :   Cameron Andersen — Jane DoddAliyah GoldSteven Gordon HolmanAkihiro IkeyamaLore LangendriesMärta MattssonKerianne Quick (Keri Kwik)Anna TalbotTanel VeenreMallory Weston.
TROPHIES // IN THE REIGN OF COYOTE
The hunt is a ritual; through gathering, searching, and collecting we create amulets, myths, and trophies. The works of these jewelers are rooted in these traditions; they look to nature and translate what they see.To hunt is to gather, to search, to collect. Through hunting, making, the weaving of stories, we are able to resist modernity’s denial of belief, and to keep our ties with the natural world. There is a primal, universal longing for myth, for an understanding of the immeasurable power of nature, and an allure in conquering, transforming, becoming. The hunt is a ritual, a way to insert ourselves into an ages-old cycle. In hunting we take on the role of maker, turning one thing into another. In making we are shamans, translating worlds, perspectives, identity.These jewelers distinguish themselves through their sensitive treatment of nature. Their work utilizes the material language of the trophy through the use of animal imagery and materials. The transformations they wrought, and the stories they weave, set them apart from other makers and unify them through aesthetic and conceptual application. In the Reign of Coyote references a collection of stories about the earth’s becoming, fables of animal and human relationships. The work of these artists looks back to a time when we, as humans, turned directly to nature for guidance, sustenance, and support.
 Jane Dodd (NZ) - Jane Dodd
Jane Dodd works in metal, wood, bone, shell and makes pieces that investigate storytelling and narrative. She is particularly interested in exploring a dialogue between nature and culture.
Marta MattssonSwooping work by Märta Mattsson  for TROPHIES
  Märta Mattsson « Märta Mattsson   sees beauty in things that other people find strange or are even repulsed by. She becomes fascinated when there is something you do not want to see and by the feeling you get when you do not want to look at something, yet you still do. Her jewellery deals with the tension that lies between attraction and repulsion. »
Sleek work by Tanel Veenre Jewellery for TROPHIESSleek work by Tanel Veenre  for TROPHIES
 Tanel Veenre  Tanel Veenre ‘s jewels take one on a journey that starts from the depths of the sea, continues on through coral reefs, past dancing sea horses and then on to the cultivation of silkworms. The voyage ends in a cosmic cloud.
Dark work by Lore Langendries for TROPHIESDark work by Lore Langendries for TROPHIES
Her research interests include the interaction between craft and industry, between unique and serial with a particular focus on (re)production, digital technology, tactility, the behaviour of materials and the subjective role of the maker. In her recent series, Hunacturing, Langendries is questioning the nature of reproduction via a combination of natural materials, mechanical treatment and the human touch.
 Aliyah Gold -  Aliyah Gold 
Animal imagery and animal-based materials have been used in jewelry dating back to the first civilizations. Gold challenges herself to create jewelry that contains the essence of an animal rather than merely a representation.
 Mallory Weston (USA)  Mallory Weston 
She works with a variety of medium including metal, fiber, concrete, and spray-paint creating bold, compelling, and interactive wearable art. Currently, she is exploring snake imagery, symbolism, and serpent dichotomies within
her work.
Steven Gordon Holman  Steven Gordon Holman
 he grew up in the West Desert (USA) where he developed a close relationship to the natural world. His work is invested in material and myth, both cultural and personal. Through the building of these myth he creates artifacts and amulets of The Tribe
 Anna Talbot  Anna Talbot
Anna Talbot’s jewellery is inspired by fairy tales, nursery rhymes, songs and stories. Wolves, deer, trees, forests and Little Red Riding Hood are all central elements in her universe, and they don’t necessarily stick to their traditional roles.
Dazzle Camo by Keri Kwik for TROPHIESDazzle Camo by Keri Kwik for TROPHIES
 

Deutsches Jagd- Und Fischereimuseum
Neuhauser Strasse 2,
80331 Munich – Germany
Wed 9:30 – 15:30, Thu 9:30 – 21:00, Fri – Mon 9:30 – 17:00
tel +49 89 220522
info@jagd-fischerei-museum.deDeutsches Jagd- und Fischereimuseum is a museum exhibiting objects connected with the history of hunting and fishing in Germany or other territories which were or are part of it. Located in the pedestrian zone of the city center of Munich

https://www.facebook.com/events/1407311132903160
trophiesschmuck@gmail.com

 We are raising funds for an EXHIBITION CATALOGUE!

 We are raising funds for an EXHIBITION CATALOGUE! If you would like one, or just want to support us making one, or want to get your hands on some LIMITED EDITION RINGS, head over to our catalogue kickstarter page! It’s a great chance to get into the action if you can’t make it to Munich this year! https://www.kickstarter.com/…/trophies-in-the-reign-of-coyo…

10/03/2015

EXPO ‘Fragmentar Matéria – Patrícia Domingues’ – Galeria Reverso, Lisbonne (Portugal) – 6-27 Mars 2015

Fragmentar Matéria | Patrícia Domingues

 Inauguração : 6 março | 18h-20h

Exposição Fragmentar Matéria de Patrícia Domingues – Inauguração com a presença da artista | 6 Mar. | 18h00 | Reverso  – Um evento integrado nas comemorações do 10.º aniversário da PIN – Associação Portuguesa de Joalharia Contemporânea

 Exposição Fragmentar Matéria de Patrícia Domingues

  »The exhibition “Fragmenting Matter” is the first body of work the artist will exhibit in Portugal. The viewer will have the opportunity to experience a range of pieces spanning from those made during her Master´s studies in Art Jewellery in Germany, to the development of more recent works.
Her general interest in the division of things—of earth, people, elements, processes and the spaces which define their beginnings and endings—have driven her to explore different ways of approaching and working materials.

Tracing spaces that provoke separation and facilitate unions, Patricia questions the material, fragmenting it and uniting it, creating intervals that could just as easily liberate as find new restrictions.
Fragmenting and reconstructing have been her process and the foundation of her research; she is always conscious that one cannot speak of separation without speaking of union.  »
Patrícia Correia Domingues

  Blue Mountain | Patrícia Domingues Brooch | Reconstructed turquoise, steel Alfinete | Turquesa reconstruida, aço    Patrícia Domingues Brooch « Blue Mountain »  Reconstructed turquoise, steel / Alfinete – Turquesa reconstruida,aço

Patrícia Domingues  Alfinete / Brooch Patrícia Domingues  Alfinete / Brooch « Many & Deliberated », 2014 – Necuron, steel -11 x 7.5 x 3.5 cm

 Fragmentar Matéria de Patrícia Domingues Patrícia Domingues - Fragmentar Matéria

Patrícia Domingues  Colar / Neckpiece  Patrícia Domingues  Colar / Neckpiece   » Set Free & Matter », 2014Reconstructed ivory, thread - 17 x 7,5 x 3,5 cm

 Patrícia Domingues (1986) studied in Portugal, Spain, Estonia and Idar-Oberstein, in Germany where she completed her Master´s degree in Art Jewellery, and where she currently resides. Her work has been recognized with awards such as New Traditional Jewellery 2012, Talente 2014 and Mary Funaky Award 2014.

 

Galeria Reverso
R. da Esperança 59/61
1200-655 – Lisbon
Portugal
Telephone: +351 213 951 407
Fax: +351 213 951 407
website: www.reversodasbernardas.com
mail: mail@reversodasbernardas.com

 

 

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