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22/02/2015

During SCHMUCK 2015 – EXPO ‘Mythen/Myths 2015′ – Galerie Weltraum, Munich (DE) – 11-17 Mars 2015

«Mythen/Myths 2015» A contemporary insight in precious Greece

Galerie Weltraum

Opening: 11 March, 7 – 10 p.m.
Sofia Zarari,  "Chronos", 2013, Photo credit: Myrto KoutoulSofia Zarari  -  « Chronos », 2013, Photo credit: Myrto Koutoul
Thirteen visual artists, architects and designers and four guest stars turn their daily experience in Greece into jewellery: family violence, mother’s Alzheimer, unconditional love, negation of death, bankruptcy, androgynous sexuality, Charlie hebdo’s impact on freedom of speech etc.
Exhibits make part of a sculptural, walk-in installation reminding of a broken ancient Greek temple or a human-sized trap, a double symbol for the Greek crisis. Daily art performances inspired by contemporary Greek culture reflect on archaic uses of jewellery.
« The Greek drama is taking place right now, almost a third of the young do not have a job, many people live hard lives. Their hardships can be connected to the suffering that heroes from the great Greek stories underwent. Our contemporary dramas both in world politics as in our personal lives resemble those tragedies described in the great Greek theater.
We lose a loved one, we encounter unfaithfulness, we are in warlike situations due to real war or we seem to be in a battle to keep our health or sanity and all of us cope with these things in different ways. All these themes are expressed in the great Greek myths. Every Greek is steeped in her or his heritage as I know from having travelled many times in Greece.
For the artists of this show their Greek background is a focal point that one can always go back to. In the jewelry and other art, made by the exhibiting artists the Greek myth has been an enormous rich well to draw from as you will see.  »
Marietta de Bruïne, Art historian, Amsterdam.
Artists: Katerina GlykaChristina KarababaAnna Kitsou –  Maro KornilakiYakinthi OikonomouSofia PaschouLoukia RichardsHeleni Siousti — Margarita Skokou — Eleftheria SpantidakiSystemalab (Sofia Daniilidou) — Konstantina Tzavidopoulou — Marianna Tzouti — Sofia Zarari
Guest artists: Eugenia Feroussi — Elina Kakourou — Katerina Kolonellou — Sofia Paschou.

 Yakinthi Oikonomou, Bonds, 2014, Photo by Orestis Rovakis
Yakinthi Oikonomou, Bonds, 2014, Photo by Orestis Rovakis
 Yakinthi Oikonomou  -"Tough love", Mixed technique, Canelloni, paper, silver, 2014 Photo credit: Orestis Rovakis  Yakinthi Oikonomou  - »Tough love », Mixed technique, Canelloni, paper, silver, 2014 Photo credit: Orestis Rovakis
  SYSTEMALAB Ring: Peristerionas Rings, 2013 Photo by: SYSTEMALABSYSTEMALAB Ring: Peristerionas 3D printed Rings, 2013 Photo by: SYSTEMALAB
Loukia Richards, "Sirens", 2013 Photo credit: Christoph Ziegler  Loukia Richards, « Pornogirls/Sirens », 2013 Photo credit: Christoph Ziegler
 Anna Kitsou, Athens  Anna Kitsou, “Kyklikos Chronos” (“Κυκλικός χρόνος”), 2012, Ρhoto credit: Giannis SeferosAnna Kitsou’s reference to aesthetics can be traced back to the Neolithic settlements, the Acropolis of Tiryns with the Cyclopean Walls, the Cycladic idols or the harmonious aerial photographs of excavations.  Her jewellery reflects magic rituals and the hope of humankind that with fire, gemstones and knots can gain control over destiny. Long before the construction of houses, roads, airplanes or refrigerators, mortals created jewellery to give them strength to confront not only enemies of the terrestrial world, but also the demons from beyond.  Jewellery was a companion for eternity, emphasizing faith in immortality.
“Each piece is a journey through land, water and fire… My inspiration is the Earth, Greece and cultures,” says the young designer and ceramist.
Mix & match of shapes and materials by Maro Kornilakh Mix & match of shapes and materials by Maro Kornilakh
"Synapsis/Alzheimer". Work in progress by Heleni Siousti. 2015  for Myths 2015 @ SCHMUCK Munich Jewellery Week: Heleni Siousti « Synapsis/Alzheimer ». Work in progress  2015 -
Helices or spirals are characteristic patterns of ancient Greek jewellery. They symbolize the moon, mazes, snails, snakes, ebb and flow, cyclical time, regeneration, perpetual motion, echo, appearance and disappearance, consciousness and unconsciousness, memory and oblivion, even the human brain itself.
The jewellery of Helen Siousti, often unfinished or imperfect, signifies memory fading away due to Alzheimer disease.
It illustrates the pain of those who, unable to act, watch their loved ones crossing the river of Lethe while being alive. Her pieces are relics of beautiful, powerful moments – the offspring of the unknown future and love.
Heleni Siousti uses her art to unite robust remembrances with glimpses of memory in an attempt to explain how fragile and vulnerable we become through the memory of what has been and will not be — no more.
She hauls childhood fears to the surface, fears which become alive as our parents walk slowly, but steadily, towards the dark forest of fairy tales while we – like helpless Hop-o’-My-Thumbs – have only crumbs in our pockets to help them trace the path leading back to us…
Heleni Siousti studied Economics in Athens and worked in the private sector. She is an acrtive member of the ecological movement in her home town Kozani in Macedonia.

Christina Karababa, Peace man! "Bang-Bang 1", 2014 Photo credit: Christina Karababa - Myths 2015 @ SCHMUCK, Munich Jewellery Week 11-17 March Galerie Weltraum: Peace man!  -  Christina Karababa, « Bang-Bang 1″, 2014 Photo credit: Christina Karababa

and should god Hephaestus, the famous blacksmith of Olympus, continue making weapons and jewellery in his workshop, he would possibly use a 3D printer.
Renowned for its decoration and apotropaic/defensive perfection is the shield Hephaistos made for Achilles.
Bang bang!
The sound of the gun in comic strips suits the myth of revolutionary subversion of aesthetics standards.
Such myths are endlessly created by fashion and technology in modern urban centers.
Everything goes, but in a different way…
« In my work I mould odd objects with contradictions as far as their operation, meaning and interpretation are concerned. These items should be conceived mostly as comments, as toys or as dangerous and naive fantasies, » writes Christina Karababa.
The artist teaches in Applied Science University Düsseldorf. She has held numerous individual and group exhibitions and co-curated the international art jewellery meeting « Zimmerhof Symposium » in 2014.
"war-like jewellery" of Katerina Glyka  Katerina Glyka  – « Lethal Jewellery » -  « war-like jewellery » of Katerina Glyka which has as starting point scenographic imitations of archaic weapons made with the technique of paper mache and ends up being potentially lethal tools made from cement.

 

Galerie Weltraum
Rumfordstrasse 26, Munich
Opening 11.03.2015 19:00 – 22:00
12.03.2015 – 17.03.2015
14:00 – 20:00
Rumfordstrasse 26, Munich
Opening 11.03.2015 19:00 – 22:00
Mail: info@weltraum26.de
tel : 0175 1121656

https://www.facebook.com/weltraum.me

 

 

12/06/2014

DECOUVERTE / COUP de COEUR : Jane Ladan

Classé dans : COUP DE COEUR,Jane LADAN (Mauritius) — bijoucontemporain @ 0:25

Jane Ladan grew up in Mauritius, a culturally rich and diverse island of the Indian Ocean with traditions and influences originating from China, Africa, Europe and India.  Having lived in South Africa and Kenya, she moved to Canada where she has been residing for the past five years.  A painter, sculptor and jewellery maker, she is a graduate of the Ottawa School of Art.  Her work celebrates the rich colours and textures found in mother earth’s biodiversity, particularly in the undersea world. She is passionate about creating unique, contemporary organic and feminine sculptural jewellery for bold and daring women of all ages.  Inspired by the dialectic inherent to positive and negative energies, she uses varied materials, genres and techniques to create sophisticated artistic and fashionable pieces that elevate humanity. Jane is the recipient of the Ted Marshall Award (2011), the David and Nicole Henderson Scholarship (2012), Lilian Raport Memorial Fund for the Arts (2012) and the Robert Hyndman Drawing & Painting Scholarship (2013)

 De la couleur, de la matière à l’excès, de la nature mais remaniée, de l’exotisme pour sûr … de la beauté en veux-tu en voilà …….

JANE LADAN - PAINTER/SCULPTOR/JEWELRY ARTIST - MAURITIUS/CANADA  - janeladan.com  https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=a.648302488597542.1073742529.135294296565033&type=3JANE LADAN – PAINTER/SCULPTOR/JEWELRY ARTIST – MAURITIUS/CANADA

Jane LADAN - Maasai’s Inspired Neck pieces "Superb Starling (Lamprotornis Superbus)"Jane LADANMaasai’s Inspired Neck pieces « Superb Starling (Lamprotornis Superbus) » – 2012-2013

 While living in Kenya in 2007, I became fascinated by the Maasai people, for their very distinctive dress and jewellery, and the rich and beautiful biodiversity that is found in Kenya and other parts of Eastern Africa.  I was particularly struck by the Maasai’s beautiful beaded jewellery and circular necklaces.
Combining this experience with the Indian Ocean influence and my background I decided to integrate my oceanic reefs’ research with the concept of circular Maasai necklaces. To represent the multiple layers of necklaces normally worn by Maasai woman, I sculpted sea anemones on my pieces.
Each neck piece is unique. Instead of using colours and geometric forms found in the sea world or in original Maasai artwork, I painted my necklaces in the distinct colours of exotic birds found in the Kenyan forest;  in contrast the delicate urchins’ primary spine give the illusion of layering and of birds’ feathers.
Most of my pieces have bright colours as in the Maasai culture each colour has a meaning: blue for the water that gives life to the grass and cattle; green representing land, grass and health; yellow and orange signifying hospitality; and black for life’s hardships. Wool was used to balance each neckpiece and to replace the long-beaded strings which are generally used in the traditional Maasai necklaces.

Jane LADAN - Maasai’s Inspired Neck pieces "Saddle-Billed Stork"Jane LADANMaasai’s Inspired Neck pieces « Saddle-Billed Stork »

Jane LADAN - Maasai’s Inspired Neck piecesJane LADANMaasai’s Inspired Neck pieces « Green-Winged Pytilia »
jane ladan - neck-piece-series-on-lichen-and-undersea-anemonesJane LADAN – neckpiece series on lichen and undersea anemones
 
« Ocean rebirth serie »

As Mauritius-born artist, my work celebrates the rich colours and textures found in mother earth’s environment, particularly in the undersea world. I am passionate about creating unique, contemporary, organic and feminine sculptural jewellery.
During the past few months I lived through emotional ups and downs triggered by the departure of my grandmother and the unambiguous weather changes that marked the months of March and April. Consequently, I was inspired to reconnect with my Indian Ocean roots triggering my desire to investigate the sea and its rich and peaceful ocean world.
In my enquiry about sea anemones, I was particularly fascinated by the Zebra Colonial Anemone for its shape and distinctive black and white stripes as well as the detail of its hundreds of tinny tentacles. Almost fabric-like to the eyes, I sculpted those anemones and painted them with different shades of white to give a sense of lightness and translucency.
In my paper clay neck piece, I use sober white, green and brown colours in the main body of my work, representing restfulness while bright red, orange and purple colours are used for anemones, depicting rebirth and life. I have also added wool into my piece to add movement and contrast between stability and change.
My approach conveys a sense of change after an accomplished cycle as well as a sense of positive renewal.

Jane LADAN - Ocean rebirthJane LADAN - Ocean rebirth – detail 
Jane LADAN - Ocean rebirthJane LADAN - Ocean rebirth neck piece - paper clay , wool
Jane LADAN - Ocean rebirthJane LADAN – Ocean rebirth – detail
Jane LADAN - Ocean rebirth detailJane LADAN - Ocean rebirth – detail
Jane LADAN - Ocean rebirth detailJane LADAN – Ocean rebirth – detail
http://janeladan.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/img_1611.jpg?w=700&h=nature inspired neckpiece

25/05/2014

EXPO ‘The After Joya effect – Maria Tsimpiskaki’ – Popeye Loves Olive, Athens (Greece) – 20-31 Mai 2014

Classé dans : Exposition/Exhibition,GALERIES,Grece (GR),Maria TSIMPISKAKI (GR) — bijoucontemporain @ 0:41
The « After Joya effect »  – Tsimpiskaki Maria Jewellery
 Tsimpiskaki Maria Jewellery exhibition!!
Inspired by the Joya – International Jewelry Exhibition in Barcelona, 6 Greek and 28 foreign jewelry designers, travel and meet again, this time at a new place, “Popeye Loves Olive” in Athens. The aim of this encounter is the interaction and the transformation of individuality to collaboration, diversity to unification and exchange to sharing.MARIA TSIMPISKAKI
Maria Tsimpiskaki was born in Rethimno, Crete in Greece. She graduated from “Athens University of Economics and Business”. She is a jewelry designer since 1990 after attending painting, sculpture, jewelry making and design courses. She lives and works in Athens.She thinks of jewelry design as a combination of lines, colors and materials that each time reveals a result of a given frame of mind, of different mental and emotional state.
It is the lines, the forms and the shapes that we encounter all around us in the natural world, in the street, or in everyday life, or even in the images that trigger in the mind…
The colors that are inherent to the materials, almost invariably require special processing before they are revealed…
Finally the materials themselves, whether luxurious, or humble, complementary or disparate or ephemeral, worked by hand; using traditional and modern techniques they produce a range of unique pieces.
Her aim is to create jewelry that are flawless in terms of construction and finish, perfectly fitting the human body so they become an essential and cherished accessory, setting off the personality of the wearer.
She is a member of the international art jewelry community klimt02 and the Italian association of contemporary jewelry AGC και Gioiellodentro.

Tsimpiskaki Maria
Tsimpiskaki Maria
Erosion-Bracelet-Maria Tsimpiskaki.  http://tsimpiskakimaria.com/

Tsimpiskaki Maria – erosion bracelet – Silver & PVC

Maria Tsimpiskaki  Jewellery   Maria Tsimpiskaki  Jewellery
Libona 5, Plateia Agias Eirinis
10560 Athènes

 tel +30 21 0867 3461

09/02/2014

EXPO ‘Gioielli Alternativi’ – Fiera Abilmente di Vicenza, Vicenza (IT) – 20-23 Fevr. 2014

« Gioielli alternativi: ingegno e creatività indossabile », Vicenza, Italia

Abilmente, Fiera di Vicenza

Gioielli Alternativi

The exhibition « Unconventional Jewels: Wearable Talent and Creativity« , hosted at Abilmente on the Vicenza fairgrounds, is dedicated to body ornaments testifying to the happy mix between manual skills and courageous insights gaining their strength from artist’s experiences, preferences and personal histories.
Curated by Nunzia De Feo is organized by associazione Nurò established in Verona, that aims to enhance works by artists and designers working on contemporary jewelry.
The more than one hundred works that will be presented, created ​​by 38 artists from various countries, in their wearability, meet the need, as old as humanity, to create artifacts with which to inevitably communicate fragments of real life stories and for this reason authentic .
As stated by one of the participants, the London based artist-goldsmith Joanne Haywood in her interesting book « Mixed-media Jewellery », there is no limit to the choice of materials to use. The rings, bracelets, necklaces, earrings and brooches exhibited are made ​​of ceramic, fiber, yarn, horn, leather, plastics, metals, wood, resin, silicone, enamels and fabrics, sometimes recycled and used in different ways to produce innovative solutions. Metal is not one of the preferred choices and is often absent or relegated to a marginal role.
In light of this consideration, the link is evident between this show and Abilmente, place of choice for fresh and important encounters with materials and experiences and with the objects of the workshops which characterize this fair.
In conclusion, these « unconventional jewels » possess an intriguing and captivating charm, sometimes as naive as disarming. They are characterized by a narrative or abstract language rich of symbolic or conceptual references and by a raw, bitter , pungent, or sometimes, by contrast, graceful, kind and almost childlike aesthetic. They offer rare moments of intellectual and spiritual empathy to visitors. They are « little living worlds » capable of awakening dormant emotions, never suspected inclinations and reflect today’s contemporaneity crossed by the incessant demand for vitality and positive zeal.
Curator Nunzia De Feo

(at Gioielli Alternativi) Marion DelarueMarion Delarue

Artistas participantes :

Luis Acosta (AR/NL) — Patricia Alvarez (AR) — Rafael Luis Alvarez Main (AR) — Agata Bartos (PL) — Elizabeth Bone (UK) — Isabelle Busnel (FR/UK) — Elizabeth Campbell (UK) — Aurelio Castano (USA) — Patricia Cruz (IT) –  Nunzia De Feo (IT) –  Marion Delarue (FR) — Corrado De Meo (IT) — Clara Del Papa (IT) –  Suzanne Esser (NL) — Resi Girardello (IT) — Laura Giusti (AR) — Marianna Hadass (UK) — Liz Hamman (UK) — Joanne Haywood (UK) – Paula Isola (AR) — Laserbean (UK) — Paula Lindblon (SE) — Francesca Marcenaro (IT/UK) — Rita Martinez  (CR/IT) — Robyn McLean (UK), Mikiko Minewaki (JP) — Maria Rosa Mongelli (AR) — Louise Perrone (CA) — Jelka Quintelier  (UK) — Wanda Romano  (IT) — Swing Kit (UK) — Uniqeco (FI) – Julie Usel (UK) — Stella Valencia (CR) — Monica Vinci (IT) — Iolanda Violante (IT) — Seo Jeong Woo (KR) – Melania Zucchi (IT)

Luis Acosta - bracciale  (at Gioielli Alternativi)Luis Acosta - bracciale
Laura Giusti - necklace (at Gioielli Alternativi)Laura Giusti – necklace

Paula Lindblom, Brooch, 2011Paula Lindblom - Brooch: Untitled, 2011 – Mixed media, glass beads, silver 925

Joanne Haywood, Neckpiece, 2013 Joanne HaywoodNeckpiece: Plant Hunter, 2013 – Silver, silk yarns, Merino felt

Elizabeth Bone, Brooch, 2012Elizabeth BoneBrooch: Geometric, 2012Oxidized silver with orange silk thread – 13x18cm

 Mikiko Minewaki, Brooch, 2006Mikiko Minewaki, Brooch, 2006

DELARUE Marion "Mania" Objet de main. Laque naturelle coréenne, cheveux humains. 2011.
Marion Delarue,   »Mania » Objet de main. Laque naturelle coréenne, cheveux humains. 2011.

Julie Usel - la route de la soie - Princes Von Thurn und Taxis: silk, thread, silver leaf, broochJulie Usel – la route de la soie : brooch « Princes Von Thurn und Taxis » – silk, thread, silver leaf

Jelka Quintelier  Polilla coll.Jelka Quintelier – Polilla, the butterfly of the night. Dark, graceful, rhythmic.

Louise Perrone - "strictly platonic" neckpiece - flag fabric, styrene sheet, nylon thread, sailing cord - 2013  http://louiseperrone.com/Louise Perrone – strictly platonic – Flag fabric, styrene sheet, nylon thread, sailing cord – 2013

Robyn McLean - Velvet Bone BroochRobyn McLean – Velvet Bone Brooch
Clara Del Papa, Ring IguazuClara Del Papa, Ring Iguazu
Corrado de Meo - brocheCorrado de Meo – brooch

 

 

Fiera Abilmente di Vicenza
Via dell »Oreficeria
36100 – Vicenza
Italy
Telephone: 333 7443972
website: www.xn--associazionenur-trb.it
mail: associazionenuroo@gmail.com

13/11/2013

Niki Stylianou en noir et blanc

Classé dans : COUP DE COEUR,Grece (GR),Niki STYLIANOU (GR),plastiques — bijoucontemporain @ 0:19

 For JOYA Barcelona 2013 Niki Stylianou presents « Vessels and Matter«   Rubber, silk and linen threads jewels.

Niki Stylianou  won the IV Yearbook Award-Arte & Joya
This award sponsored by Gruppo Duplex consists of a large communication campaign among the magazines of the group as well as a series of international promotion measures.
« I love making things with my hands and I love learning new techniques while exploring diverse materials and their inherent qualities. Jewelry gave me the opportunity to experiment, in a much smaller scale, with the tools that my Architectural experience gave me. And I really liked the designs I came up with. They had a structure, a certain form and they could be deconstructed and rearranged in endless variations. I guess this was the biggest challenge for me… I entered my own game and I never stopped playing …
I would describe my style as different, I think. A little bit controversial with a dose of irony and humor. It is geometrical but whimsical. Austere but playful and colorful at times. Elegant but bold. And it has ethnic references. My customers do not belong to a specific age group. but they tend to be somewhat passionate and eccentric.« 
What inspires you?
« The human body, everyday life, humble and overlooked materials, the ambiguous and the ephemeral, Bauhaus, geometry and architecture, form, color, texture, rhythm and repetition, humor…« 
« Starting to incorporate into my metal-smithing different re-cycled or up-cycled materials. Lately I have been obsessed with rubber, coming from up-cycled kitchen rubber gloves. An object that almost every woman can identify with. I hand-cut it, hand-paint it and combine it with precious and semi-precious metals and stones to give it new life. To transform it into something else. What amazes me is that although a synthetic material, rubber becomes “alive’ again, through an almost “organic” process. Slow, meticulous and repetitive. The resulting pieces grow to their final form while unfolding in time in a meditative kind of way.«   (from Noblivity interview)
Niki Stylianou presents "Vessels and Matter"  Rubber, silk and linen threads.
‘VESSELS AND MATTER’ Necklace; rubber, silk and linen threads

Niki Stylianou - 2013
necklace worn
Niki Stylianou | Necklace, from Joia Barcelona exhibition
Necklace; rubber, silk, linen threads, metal
Niki Stylianou wearing her necklace
Niki Stylianou wearing her necklace during JOYA Barcelona 2013
Niki Stylianou necklace
Niki Stylianou necklace
Niki Stylianou necklace
Niki Stylianou necklace with some silver « finger tips »
Niki Stylianou necklaceNiki Stylianou necklace  (details)
Niki Stylianou brooch
Niki Stylianou brooch
Niki Stylianou black necklace - detail
Niki Stylianou black « scarf » necklace – detail

22/05/2013

Concrètement, vous avez quoi ?

c’est certain que le ciment, c’est « concret », pour jouer avec les mots !

Attention, article bétonné !! ;-)

Amira Jalet presents "La esencia del Otro"  Cemento procesado con arena y piedra, rejilla electro-soldada, resina transparente, madera de balsa y laurel, vidrio de color y aluminio.sera présente à JOYA 2013Amira Jalet  « La esencia del Otro »  Cemento procesado con arena y piedra, rejilla electro-soldada, resina transparente, madera de balsa y laurel, vidrio de color y aluminio.

 Mass Construction by Benita Dekel (Jewelry Design Department, Shenkar College of Engineering and Design)  You can almost sense Betina’s hands carving their way through concrete. The raw feeling of it takes me to the land of scaffolding and builders.  Photos by Ran Plotnizky.Benita Dekel (IL),  2011  – Mass Construction by Benita Dekel (Jewelry Design Department, Shenkar College of Engineering and Design)
You can almost sense Betina’s hands carving their way through concrete. The raw feeling of it takes me to the land of scaffolding and builders.  Photos by Ran Plotnizky. (from DesignMilk)

Benita Dekel, 2011 - jewelry with concreteBenita Dekel, 2011 – jewelry with concrete – braceletBergner Schmidt‘s concrete jewelry is both architectural and sculptural.Bergner Schmidt concrete jewelry – collier en béton – Bergner Schmidt‘s concrete jewelry is both architectural and sculptural.

Bergner Schmidt concrete jewelry - collier en bétonBergner Schmidt  concrete jewelry - 

bergner schmidt, concrete jewelry Concrete Jewelry by Bergner Schmidt
Concrete collar - concrete jewelry by bergner schmidtBergner Schmidt Concrete collar – concrete jewelry

Geraldine Nishi  Necklace: Melanzana 2010  Concrete, silver, beadsGeraldine Nishi  Necklace: Melanzana 2010  Concrete, silver, beads
kathleen_hennemann - beton - http://www.khxx.com/index_flash.htmlKathleen Hennemann – beton collection 
kathleen_hennemann beton http://www.khxx.com/index_flash.html
Kathleen Hennemann – beton collection
kathleen_hennemann beton - http://www.khxx.com/index_flash.html Kathleen Hennemann – beton collection
The dynamic concrete SET bracelet worn - 275$ -  concrete jewelry by KON ZUKconcrete jewelry by KON ZUK - Concrete + Stainless Steel  bracelet (Karen Konzuk aspires to create jewelry that is more wearable architecture than simple accessory. A graduate of the Nova Scotia College of Art and Design, Karen earned a BFA with a major in Jewelry Design and a minor in Art History, and then introduced the KONZUK line shortly after graduation.)
anillo de hormigón armado diseñado por Fernando Menis    Menis concrete ringanillo de hormigón armado diseñado por Fernando Menis   (ES)  Menis concrete ring
Concrete ring by Holcim Art (author of jewelry is MgA. Katka Venclíková, A graduate of the Academy of Arts, Architecture and Design in Prague) -  http://www.holcimart.cz/en/inspiration/Concrete ring by Holcim Art (CZ) (jewelry by MgA. Katka Venclíková, A graduate of the Academy of Arts, Architecture & Design, Prague)  
Holcim Art - "Functionnal house' concrete necklaceHolcim Art (CZ) (jewelry by MgA. Katka Venclíková) – « Functionnal house’ concrete necklace

REVIVRE RING, Concrete-Nickel. Nickel-plated concrete and brass ring shank. REVIVRE RING, Concrete-Nickel. Nickel-plated concrete and brass ring shank.
DECADENCE – Collection 05 – by GALA curios (AU), a jewellery and accessories label by designer Jasmine Noir.
DECADENCE draws aesthetically on ruinous cities – landscapes which have been developed and then abandoned by humans, and overgrown once again by nature. Contrasting sharp geometry with organic, ornamental detail, the collection miniaturises the cycle of life, death and the beauty of decay.

Área Visual: Concrete rings: materiales de arquitectura al servicio de la moda. 22designstudio.22Design Studio (Taiwan) created a series of rings which were inspired by architectural design and urban style, made from cement and stainless steel. Smooth, cool concrete texture and various shapes of these rings emit calm yet inspiring design by the two young designers from Taiwan. (22 Design Studio was founded by Sean Yu and Yi-ting Cheng in 2005. The main mission of 22 Design Studio is to operate self-owned label 22™. The collection of 22™ presents series of personal accessories made of cement and metal) 

concrete ring - Jim Cotter Jewelryconcrete ring // Jim Cotter Gallery

Ring in gold and concrete with diamonds by Patrice FabrePatrice FabreRing in gold and concrete with diamonds  

Concrete Objective Ring - Faceted angles have been cast and shaped by hand into a sculptural, cubist-style grey ring. Care instructions: This is a unique handmade piece of art jewellery. Please treat it delicately and avoid contact with liquids and perfumes. 66£  notjustalabel.com  20130127 11:32notjustalabel – Concrete Objective Ring – Faceted angles have been cast and shaped by hand into a sculptural, cubist-style grey ring. notjustalabel.com

stylized organs jewlery. these are actually pendants. made of concrete by anna szabó. i'd take the heart.Anna Szabó / Ivanka Studio (HU) – stylized organs jewlery – pendants. made of concrete (from Mocoloco)- awarded “Jewel of the Year 2012”

Concrete rings - by Israel's Hadas Shaham  Defying the cold, industrial style you might expect from a line of concrete jewellery, her pieces are architectural with a pretty flourish — little pieces of paved paradise that even Joni Mitchell might appreciate.    http://www.hadas-shaham.com/Concrete rings – by Israel’s Hadas Shaham  Defying the cold, industrial style you might expect from a line of concrete jewellery, her pieces are architectural with a pretty flourish   (from thecarrotbox)

Another square ring from Hadas Shaham. concrete tire tread pattern.square ring from Hadas Shaham (IL) (detail). concrete tire tread pattern.

Hadas Shaham Ring Necklace - Concrete, Sterling Silver and Gold PlatingHadas Shaham Ring Necklace – Concrete, Sterling Silver and Gold Plating

Set in Cement Round Ring - concrete ring -    Made exclusively for sale in the Walker Art Museum Gift Shop.  shop.walkerart.orgSet in Cement Round Ring – concrete ring -    Made exclusively for sale in the Walker Art Museum Gift Shop.  shop.walkerart.org

Concrete ring for Hazy day  by Lezerman, via Flickr      http://www.lezerman.comLinda Ezerman Concrete ring for Hazy day

Metsa Design : Cement pearls - These cement earrings are modeled on classic pearl studs. Each concrete sphere is cast by hand and set onto a sterling silver post. With wear, the colour of the earrings will deepen as the concrete is exposed to the air and the oils from your skin.Metsa Design : Cement pearls – These cement earrings are modeled on classic pearl studs. Each concrete sphere is cast by hand and set onto a sterling silver post. With wear, the colour of the earrings will deepen as the concrete is exposed to the air and the oils from your skin.
Check this out – Handmade Concrete Jewelry from Berezki Handmade Concrete Jewelry from Berezki Jewelry (Alisa Berezovski)

Liesbet Bussche

Belgian designer & street artist Liesbeth Bussche adds glamour to Amsterdam streets by replicating jewelery pieces from industrial items found around town such as these post earrings made of concrete ballsLiesbet Bussche - Belgian designer & street artist Liesbeth Bussche adds glamour to Amsterdam streets by replicating jewelery pieces from industrial items found around town such as these post earrings made of concrete balls

urban concrete ball earring by Liesbeth Bussche
Liesbet Bussche, her graduation project from the Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam was all about street jewellery.

cement returns to cement …………..

05/04/2013

EXPO ‘Jess Dare: The Nature of Memory’ – Studio 20/17, Waterloo (Australia) – 2-20 Avril 2013

Jess Dare: The Nature of Memory – Jewellery & Objects

 Jess Dare detail  http://studio2017.com.au/(Lampwork glass detail)

Jess Dare’s exhibition, ‘The Nature of Memory’ explores the fragility of memory through a series of delicate glass plant specimens. Her interest in our innate human desire to preserve the natural world is realized throughought this series of miniatures and wearable objects. “In this exhibition I aim to express the ephemeral nature of memory through the fragility of glass and nature itself.”
Dare’s work references the idea that life, like memory is fleeting and fragile. She laments that the beauty and detail is often compromised when trying to replicate the intricacies of natural forms, with the exception of the Blaschka’s hyper-realistic glass models in The Natural History Museum at Harvard University. These exceptional pieces of glasswork have strongly influenced Jess Dare’s practice to date and she feels a connection within this current series to the documentary detail of these botanical models.
The series itself is composed of objects and wearable items, miniature glass succulent forms that are silicon moulded and cast in silver; transforming the delicate, fragile glass with its lustrous colour into sturdy, cold and almost lifeless silver replicas. Jess Dare explores the botany of the mind, accentuating the transience of memory through her intricate and fantastical miniatures.

 Jess Dare  http://studio2017.com.au/Jess Dare Brooches: Drawn Epicormic Series 2013 White powder coated brass and copper, stainless steel, sterling silver, lamp work glass photo Grant Hancock

Jess Dare  Brooch: Xylem Series 2013  White powder coated brass and sterling silver, stainless steel  photograph by Grant HancockJess Dare  Brooches: Xylem Series 2013  White powder coated brass and sterling silver, stainless steel  photograph by Grant Hancock

Jess Dare  Neckpiece: Xylem 2013  White powder coated brass, stainless steel  photograph by Grant HancockJess Dare  Neckpiece: Xylem 2013  White powder coated brass, stainless steel  photograph by Grant Hancock

 

Studio 20/17
Unit 6B, 2 Danks St
NSW 2017 – Waterloo
Australia
Telephone: 02 9698 7999
Fax: 02 9698 7999
website: www.studio2017.com.au
mail: gallery@studio2017.com.au

09/03/2013

EXPO ‘Arrhythmia ‘ – Beyond Fashion, Antwerp (Belgium) – 14 Mars-20 Avril 2013

Carolina Apolonia: Arrhythmia  

 The heart. Unnoticed but for its consistent beat, it determines whether we live or die. The heart is thrilled when in love, swells with inspiration and good spirits, is flooded by passion and broken by grief.
My work, this collection, is about the resilience of the human heart; its rhythm pulsating with great joy, trouble and adversity. I used natural materials very close to the human skin: leather and parchment. By hand-stitching these materials to silver, I create new structures to be worn almost as an extension of the body; as outward expressions of the rhythms inside.
My mother taught me at a very early age how to stitch. Stitching holds memories of long happy hours working with her. I think I am drawn to its time-consuming, repetitive and meditative nature: it forces me to slow down and gives me a sense of freedom: that I can use the needle to connect and repair anything. Most of the leather I use for these pieces is old and recycled. So are the used book covers. Old and worn-out materials tell stories, they carry tales about how they’ve been cherished or abused. The stitching brings the old materials together, heals them, thus creating new narratives out of old histories.  Carolina Apolonia

Carolina Apolonia: Arrhythmia    Place: Beyond Fashion  (Antwerp, Belgium)  14-Mar-2013 - 20-Apr-2013Carolina Apolonia – Brooch – Leather, silver

Carolina Apolonia  Brooch  Leather, silverCarolina Apolonia – Brooch – Leather, silver

CAROLINA APOLONIA

CAROLINA APOLONIA

 

Beyond Fashion
Pourbusstraat 7
2000 – Antwerp
Belgium
Telephone: +3232378541website: www.beyondfashion.be
mail:beyondfashion@antwerpen.be

25/01/2013

EXPO ‘BODYPARTy’ – Goldfingers Gallery, Copenhagen (DK) – 10 Janv.-5 Fevr. 2013

BODYPARTy / Katrine Borup

10 jan – 5 feb / Fernisering 9 jan. kl 16-19 / Artist talk 16 jan 16.30 -17.30

BODYPARTy is a jewellery series related to anatomic models – objects that playfully address a likeness to body parts, organs, tissue types, cell structures etc.

It can be characterized as a sort of information project but also as a critique of today’s prevailing concept of the body that is based on information and science. We know EVERYTHING there is to know about what is healthy and unhealthy for us. We are bombarded with self-help books, articles in women’s magazines and information campaigns. Control and restraint are in vogue; pleasure and indulgence are considered signs of weakness.
All the jewellery is made of balloons. This choice is not least based on a desire to strike a contrast to the rational mindset – balloons are associated with celebrations and happy occasions, childish innocence; they hold immediate appeal and are very physical ….they make us want to reach out and touch. In the project, some of the most prominent balloon characteristics, such as their inflatability, have been used as a comment on to the body-related theme.
The project also plays with the concepts of applied art, crafts, art and design, in part by virtue of the functional quality of some of the pieces – although the function does border on the absurd.
The jewellery in the BODYPARTy series consists of deliberately contradictory, almost inconsistent objects, at once playful and serious, appealing and unappealing, intellectual and sensuous. At once cause and effect or disease, cure and prevention in an often confounding mix.
“The fact is that we all have a risk of dying of all sorts of things. And the risk of dying is 100 percent.”
John Brodersen, associate professor in the Department of Public Health, the University of Copenhagen

 

EXPO 'BODYPARTy' - Goldfingers Gallery, Copenhagen (DK) - 10 Janv.-5 Fevr. 2013 dans Danemark (DK) 7_om_ugen....web
7_om_ugen...n_ja_mske_lidt_ dans Exposition/Exhibition

Katrine Borup Piece: 7 units a week … well, maybe just a drop more … /red wine flask 2013

Wine-coloured mouths of balloons, two complete balloons, corks, red leather string, silver
My worst visions of a stomach suffering the effects of too much red wine – spongy and full of holes. Two complete balloons have been inserted into the stomach to mark the transitions to, respectively, the oesophagus and the intestines, and the size and shape of the stomach is approximately correct. This piece of jewellery is worn on the body like a waist pack, so that the container is located on top of the actual stomach on the left side of the body, directly underneath the ribs. The wearer can fill the two balloons with a liquid according to preference (and conscience).  The red X on the back acts as a ‘NO’ mark.

discokollaps_web dans Gal. Goldfingers (DK)
Katrine BorupPiece: Disco Collapse/posture-correcting back jewellery 2013
Balloon ends from long, thin neutral-colour balloon animal balloons
The human spine consists of 24 vertebrae, the os sacrum and the coccyx. In between the vertebrae (7 cervical (neck) vertebrae, 12 thoracic (middle back) vertebrae and 5 lumbar (lower back) vertebrae) there are a total of 23 elastic discs, made of cartilage, which serve as buffers to prevent the shock of body movements from affecting the brain. Over time, the discs are worn, and in the Western world especially, many people suffer from back problems; a prolapsed disc is a common diagnosis. Too much sedentary work is one of the explanations, and the solution – both the prevention and the cure – is physical activity and posture-correcting and muscle-strengthening back training.

Disco Collapse consists of 23 balloon discs that can be assembled to form 4 small (disco) balls (which also bear some resemblance to massage balls), which in turn can be combined in pairs to form “dumbbells”. The piece can take on a wide variety of shapes, from the completely collapsed to the carefully assembled. The 23 balloon discs vary in size like the discs of the spine, and the assembly of the balloon snippets plays on the fact that a prolapsed disc is a bulge on a disc that occurs as the soft centre of the disc pushes through the tough connective tissue that surrounds the disc. The balloon discs consist of nothing but bulges. The mouth of a balloon has been integrated to reflect a dream of simply being able to fix a prolapsed buffer by re-inflating it.

drowning_by_enumbers_1 dans Katrine BORUP (DK)
 Katrine Borup -  Piece: Drowning by E-numbers 2013
Balloon ends from long, thin balloon animal balloons, thread
A section of my beautifully colour-enhanced small intestine enlarged ten times.
This piece of jewellery resembles the shape and appearance of the small intestine – a section of human small intestine enlarged ten times. The inside of the small intestine is covered in intestinal villi: millimetre-sized folds that increase the surface area of the small intestine and thus the absorption of nutrients considerably. Drowning by E-numbers is a wide belt or tube that one pulls up around one’s body (or down – depending on one’s build) – a balloon corset. Drowning by E-numbers maintains the same diameter throughout the length of the tube, so unlike a normal corset it will fit loosely around the waist and tend to fold up, turning the ”villi-lined” interior inside-out. In this state, the piece almost resembles a bathing ring or life ring. Others might be reminded of a “belly tyre”. While the corset is associated with CONTROL, the tyre is a sign of the opposite. The title refers to food colouring and plays with the idea that it takes knowledge and information to eat right. Anyone taking on that challenge might soon find themselves drowning in the vast ocean of often contradictory information on the topic.

 
Goldfingers
Klosterstræde 18
1157 Copenhagen K
Denmark
Tlf (+45) 32173730
mail@goldfingers.dk

http://www.goldfingers.dk/dk/page/bodyparty–katrine-borup

01/12/2012

EXPO ‘UNEXPECTED PLEASURES’ – Design Museum, London (UK) – 5 Dec. 2012–3 Mars 2013

Classé dans : BOOKS / BIBLIO,Exposition/Exhibition,Grande-Bretagne (UK),MUSEE — bijoucontemporain @ 0:03

UNEXPECTED PLEASURES

The Art and Design of Contemporary Jewellery

A Design Museum, London touring exhibition

unexpected-pleasures-0.jpg

Bringing together almost 200 objects from around the world, Unexpected Pleasures celebrates the work of contemporary jewellers who have challenged the conventions of jewellery design.

Curated by jewellery designer and maker Dr. Susan Cohn, the exhibition offers a survey of contemporary jewellery presented through a number of themes: Worn Out – celebrating the experience of wearing jewellery, Linking Links – looking at the ways in which meaning and narratives are expressed in jewellery and A Fine Line – offering insights into the origins of contemporary jewellery today, highlighting key instigators of the contemporary jewellery movement.

The exhibition will feature prominent UK and international jewellers including Wendy Ramshaw, renowned for her complex geometric designs, Hans Stofer’s intricate wire form jewellery, Gijs Bakker’s conceptual adornments and delicate abstract pieces by Dorothea Pruhl.

« UNEXPECTED Pleasures, an exhibition of the world’s ugliest, loveliest, most intriguing contemporary jewellery, opened at the National Gallery of Victoria International yesterday.
 »Everything here is designed to be worn, » said guest curator and jewellery designer Susan Cohn.
Visitors took that as a challenge, moving through 180 dimly lit curiosities by the world’s most radical designers, trying to imagine what it would be like to wear a necklace of glass and ceramic dildos. Or a tubular  »veil » collar like a pearly plastic version of Ned Kelly’s helmet. Or a cluster of rusted bolts and nails on a silver  »Screw Ring ».
»After procreation and survival, our next instinct as humans is adornment, » Cohn said when asked,  »Why? »
 »Adornment is about attracting a mate, which in turn, is about procreation and survival. »
Some humans, however, obviously require more complex, intellectual adornments than others.  »Yes, some wearers will want something that speaks that way for them, » Cohn said. Among the exhibits was a vast choice of such expression, from the minimalist exquisitry of a grey sunray-pleated yoke, to a clump of small pale  »tumours », photographed bursting through a model’s frock. The latter was in a category of radical ideas.
NGV director Gerard Vaughan said the exhibition offered  »a fresh view of the many meanings associated with jewellery ».
The visiting director of London’s Design Museum, Deyan Sudjic, said it was the result of a  »long, drawn-out, cerebral process », and that is precisely how it felt.
Unexpected Pleasures: The Art and Design of Contemporary Jewellery, is a Design Museum, London, exhibition funded by the Joan and Peter Clemenger Trust.
It is free and runs until August 26, when it will travel to London. (Daily Life.com.au)

 

MEGA,  2009
Camilla Prasch – MEGA 2009 – red dyed snap fasteners, nylon thread, silicone discs – Photo: Dorte Krogh
Lauren Kalman, Hard Wear (Oral Rims), 2006, Electroformed mold with gold plating

Doug Bucci, USA, Trans-Hematopoietic neckpiece (2010).Doug Bucci, USA, Trans-Hematopoietic neckpiece (2010).

Susie Ganch, USA, Yellow dust, brooch (2010).Susie Ganch, USA, Yellow dust, brooch (2010)

Unexpected pleasures exhibition.David Bielander, Scampi, armband/bracelet, 2007

Unexpected pleasures exhibition.Karl Fritsch Screw ring 2010 silver, nails, screws

 

Karl Fritsch, New Zealand, Steinhaufen, ring 2004.Karl Fritsch, New Zealand, Steinhaufen, ring 2004

Unexpected pleasures exhibition.Hyewon Kim -  Torn 1 (2011) – resin, twigs Photo: Myoungwook Huh

Unexpected Pleasures exhibition
Tiffany Parbs – Extension (2008) – hand woven hair, digital print – photo Terence Bogue
Caroline Broadhead, England, Veil, necklace (1983).
Caroline Broadhead, England, Veil, necklace (1983).
Susanne Klemm, Frozen, necklace, plasticSusanne Klemm, « Frozen » necklace, plastic

Blanche Tilden  Speed, neckpiece  2000  borosilicate glass, titanium, anodised aluminium  1.2 x 24.0 cm  Collection of the artistBlanche TILDEN – Speed, neckpiece  2000  borosilicate glass, titanium, anodised aluminium

Paul Derrez  Pleated Collar  1982  Plastic, steel  Collection of Paul DerrezPaul Derrez  Pleated Collar  1982  Plastic, steel 

Felieke van der Leest - necklace Felieke van der Leest – necklace

Rose by Gijs Bakker: Colour photograph in laminated plastic (1983)    http://egetal.com.au/static/files/assets/7ab4f2ba/Image_1_news.jpgGijs Bakker Rose necklace – Colour photograph in laminated plastic (1983) 

Dorothea Prühl - Habicht (Hawk), 2006 necklace, elm wood - H 40 cm Dorothea Prühl Habicht (Hawk), 2006 necklace, elm wood – H 40 cm

Noon Passama, Brooch, 2010Noon Passama, Brooch, 2010

 

First on show at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 20 April – 26 August 2012, this exhibition will also tour to the Design Museum in London, 5 Dec 2012 – 3 Mar 2013. Melbourne based designer and maker Dr. Susan Cohn (interview with The Age) has curated this exhibition for the Design Museum and is also co-author of the substantial catalogue documenting this event as well contributing to the discussion about contemporary design and making.

 

 

VIDEO

 

Design Museum
28 Shad Thames
London SE1 2YD
Programme 020 7940 8790
Office 020 7403 6933
Fax 0207 378 6540info@designmuseum.org

OPENING HOURS

Daily 10am – 5.45pm
Last admission 5.15pm

 

BOOK :

EXPO ‘UNEXPECTED PLEASURES’ – Design Museum, London (UK) - 5 Dec. 2012–3 Mars 2013 dans BOOKS / BIBLIO Unexpected-Pleasures-634
exhibition catalog -  Unexpected Pleasures – By Design Museum edited by Susan Cohn, 2012
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