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09/12/2016

EXPO ‘New Tastes – Twelve New Graduates’ – Kath Libbert Jewellery Gallery (UK) – 10 Nov. 2016–29 Janv. 2017

New Tastes


Twelve New Graduates

 New Tastes Twelve New Graduates - kath libbert jewellery gallery- 10th Nov - 29th Jan 2017Darcey Skelly,  Space Cows From Space)

 Twelve New Graduates
Delectable jewellery, metalwork and silversmithing! Our annual pick of the most delicious new talents selected from all across the UK and Ireland!

Kath Libbert Jewellery Gallery, which this year celebrates twenty years at Salts Mill, Saltaire, has selected and exhibited the work of new graduates since its inception. In numerous cases these emerging talents have gone on to gain wide acclaim for their work, and many continue to be represented by the gallery. For the exhibition New Tastes Kath serves up twelve sumptuous collections cooked up by new graduates from all over the UK and Ireland:  ‘Spotting and then supporting the work of cutting edge new graduates has always been extremely central to the ethos of the gallery.  Forging a career straight out of college is really challenging. Now, more than ever, it is vital to exhibit and encourage these incredibly talented jewellers and metalsmiths at this formative stage in their careers.’

 
Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art -
Rob Anderson, Sheffield Hallam University - already a winner, bagging the prestigious 2016 Business Design Centre New Designer of the Year Award for his Japanese ceramic inspired ‘family’ of earthy steel vessels entitled ‘Heavy Hands’. Their meditative beauty arises from his carefully considered making process – a wonderfully tactile collection with great presence.
Hayley Brooks, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee -
Chen Cheng, Birmingham School of Jewellery -
Sheng Zhang, Birmingham School of Jewellery

Room for more?

We are also delighted to serve up collections byFrancesca Lobb, Manchester School of Art; Felicity Lynden, University of Edinburgh;  Freya Alder, Glasgow School of Art; Stephanie O Leary, Middlesex University, London; Michaela Murrain, De Montfort University, Leicester, and Amanda Denison, Winchester School of Art.

 ***

Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art‘Go with the Glow’ is a taste explosion – sensual, soft to the touch jewels, in a riot of fluorescent UV reactive nylon wire, inspired by raves, laser light shows, and jellyfish!
« My jewellery is focused on exploring the multisensory experience and making tactile wearable pieces, which involve different sensory experiences such as vision, sound, and touch. The inspiration for the jewellery series “Go with the Glow” stems from capturing the moving moments in the natural world. I was deeply attracted by free-swimming marine animal. For example jellyfish, which is soft, light, and glowing with the characteristics of amazing colours. I was also fascinated by dancing, rave party and laser light show.
I developed my work by experimenting with acrylic, moving beads, UV reactive nylon wire, UV light and fluorescent paints resulting in light-weighted tactile, colourful and playful pieces. The nylon wires under UV light creates an amazing fluorescent effect and provide a pleasant visual enjoyment for the wearers and viewers. Moreover, the pieces create subtle sounds, following freely with the movements of the body. »

Education
2009-2013 | BA Jewellery and Silversmithing College of Art and Design, Beijing University of Technology
2014-2016 | MFA Jewellery and Silversmithing  Edinburgh College of Art

Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art - ‘Go with the Glow’- bangle in acrylic, seed beads, fluorescent plastic tube and nylon wire. Photo by Shannon Tofts  Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art – ‘Go with the Glow’- bangle in acrylic, seed beads, fluorescent plastic tube and nylon wire. Photo by Shannon Tofts 

Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art - ‘Go with the Glow’- brooch in acrylic, seed beads, fluorescent plastic tube and nylon wire. Photo by Shannon Tofts Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art - ‘Go with the Glow’- brooch in acrylic, seed beads, fluorescent plastic tube and nylon wire. Photo by Shannon Tofts

Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art - ‘Go with the Glow’- pendant in acrylic, seed beads, fluorescent plastic tube and nylon wire. Photo by Shannon Tofts  Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art - ‘Go with the Glow’- pendant in acrylic, seed beads, fluorescent plastic tube and nylon wire. Photo by Shannon Tofts 

Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art - ‘Go with the Glow’- ring in acrylic, seed beads, fluorescent plastic tube and nylon wire. Photo by Shannon Tofts   Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art – ‘Go with the Glow’- ring in acrylic, seed beads, fluorescent plastic tube and nylon wire. Photo by Shannon Tofts 

Amanda Denison, Winchester School of Art
« I am inspired and intrigued by the traces left behind through dilapidation and decay and by the marks stamped on the urban environment.  And I am drawn to repeated elements that distort and change. 
I have a fine art background and this influences my approach to jewellery making. I live and work in West London and take numerous photographs of the details I discover as I walk the streets. These are incorporated into my work through mark making and drawings on my enameled surfaces.
I enjoy the challenge of working with industrial materials and traditional processes to create distinctive hand made art Jewellery. I like to work with steel and to add silver accents. I incorporate enamels and patinas to add colour but my palette is subtle and restrained. After kiln firing my enamels are deconstructed and the shiny finish is abraded. This creates richly degraded surfaces with subtle areas of hue and tone and a smooth matt finish. Where patches of bare steel are revealed they are encouraged to rust.  Each piece is unique for although I can repeat the processes there is always an element of chance and no two pieces are ever exactly the same. »

Amanda Denison, Winchester School of Art. - Enamelled steel necklace on silver chain  -  : Amanda Denison, Winchester School of Art. – Enamelled steel necklace on silver chain

Amanda Denison, Winchester School of Art - Double enamelled steel brooch -  .: Amanda Denison, Winchester School of Art – Double enamelled steel brooch

 

Michaela Murrain, De Montfort University, Leicester
« My work is all about colour, shape and repetition. The idea of taking plain white, flat pieces of fabric and manipulating them to create wearable sculpture is what excites me as a maker. I am inspired by the bold characteristics of neck adornment within African culture and from this I created my ‘Chunk and Loop’ jewellery collection where I have translated subtle elements, such as the placement of colour and scale, to create tactile, vibrant yet sophisticated, contemporary wearables. »

Michaela Murrain, De Montfort University, Leicester - ‘Chunk and Loop’ necklace in hand dyed cotton Michaela Murrain, De Montfort University, Leicester – ‘Chunk and Loop’ necklace in hand dyed cotton

 

Stephanie O Leary, Middlesex University, London
« Drawn to the simplicity and elegance of clean lines in architectural design, Stephanie O’Leary is influenced by geometric structures which jut-out, protrude or extend from the existing ‘frame’ of their environment. Specifically scaffolding, cranes and power lines.
Scaffolding: “a temporary structure used to support the construction, maintenance and repair of buildings”.
What some may perceive as a temporary ugliness protruding out of the natural urban environment; she is drawn to its linear design, the contrast between permanence and degradation, and the transient nature of its construction.
Formed from various different components, scaffolding can be assembled in various different ways to integrate with and support a building; the structure can be assembled, disassembled, relocated and assembled again. In this sense, over time, the structure is in a constant state of flux, moving around the city.
By focussing on this dynamic, O’Leary uses universal hinges and industrial materials to create kinetic urban structures, which mimic the minimalist and fragmented aesthetic of London.
In combination with found objects, industrial and precious materials, O’Leary forms connections and links between discarded objects, material connotations and their environment in relation to urban cityscapes. »

Stephanie O Leary, Middlesex University, London - ‘Fragments’ – necklace in enamelled copper, steel, silver with fragment pieces encased in scaffolding inspired frames on articulated wooden chain  Stephanie O Leary, Middlesex University, London – ‘Fragments’ – necklace in enamelled copper, steel, silver with fragment pieces encased in scaffolding inspired frames on articulated wooden chain 

Stephanie O Leary, Middlesex University, London - ‘Roof Truss Brooch’ in wood, steel and brass  Stephanie O Leary, Middlesex University, London – ‘Roof Truss Brooch’ in wood, steel and brass 
  »Scaffolding: “a temporary structure used to support the construction, maintenance and repair of buildings”. « 

 

Chen Cheng, Birmingham School of Jewellery – inspired by ballet, Chen’s delightfully playful series of rings and brooches seem alive, dancing on the body – every element of her finely manipulated metal wire mini sculptures move as the wearer moves.
« Chen Cheng believes that contemporary jewellery is interactive because it demands a response, which can either be physical or emotional. Through kinetic movement and visual interaction, her work is designed to be explored.
“My pieces invoke play. Every element is movable, and this quality enhances the physical movement of the wearer”.
Combining her own aesthetic and working style, Chen has taken inspiration from shapes and moving modes found in the human body, which are also expressed through modern and traditional ballet dancing. Applying this motion to express the mystique and magical forms of the human body was the key determining process in her jewellery design.
Using fine wire and simple metal shapes to create the minimal forms allows the audiences to pay close attention to the movement of the work. Akin to dancing, each piece’s “performance” holds its own surprise in style and character.
Chen hopes that her work will encourage the wearers to touch, feel and discover the meaning behind her work. She hopes that through a deeper appreciation of such interaction, jewellery can be better understood and more people would be able to appreciate the different expressions and styles of contemporary jewellery. »

Dancing On My Own - kinetic ring -  Chen Cheng, Birmingham School of Jewellery;: Chen Cheng, Birmingham School of Jewellery – Dancing On My Own – kinetic ring

  "dancing on my own" kinetic ring -  Chen Cheng, Birmingham School of Jewellery;: Chen Cheng, Birmingham School of Jewellery – Dancing On My Own – kinetic ring

Chen Cheng - Dancing on my own kinetic broochChen Cheng, Birmingham School of Jewellery – Dancing On My Own – kinetic  brooch 

Chen Cheng (CN) - Dancing On My Own - kinetic ring - Chen Cheng, Birmingham School of Jewellery – Dancing On My Own – kinetic  ring

 

Francesca Lobb, Manchester School of Art
« Through the exploration of body adornment and personal possessions my practice primarily focusses around how an object evokes personal comfort for its owner. Through interrogation of pre-owned objects and our interaction with our personal belongings, my works emphasis is on the user’s experience. By observing these interactions I question how the design of an object can entice an individual to explore the piece and how this can provoke the wearer to form a personal attachment to the item.
Producing small scale objects with close attention to detail, I question how the user will interact with each piece. Creating intricate designs that evoke engagement, generates an individual narrative upon each item through the user’s choice of how it is worn.
Exploration of traditional techniques within jewellery and metal work is integral within my practice to produce individual handmade items, which also allows myself as a maker to form a personal connection to each piece throughout its creation. »

 Francesca Lobb, Manchester School of Art - ‘Watchmaker’s Brooch’ – from ‘Explore’ Collection.  Worn on the inside of the jacket to reflect the significance of the user's personal choice. Brass, chain, stainless steel and corked glass vials - Francesca Lobb, Manchester School of Art - ‘Watchmaker’s Brooch’ – from ‘Explore’ Collection.  Worn on the inside of the jacket to reflect the significance of the user’s personal choice. Brass, chain, stainless steel and corked glass vials

‘Watchmaker’s Brooch’ - from ‘Explore’ Collection in brass, chain, stainless steel and corked glass vials - ; Francesca Lobb, Manchester School of Art;: Francesca Lobb, Manchester School of Art - ‘Watchmaker’s Brooch’ - from ‘Explore’ Collection in brass, chain, stainless steel and corked glass vials

Francesca Lobb, Manchester School of Art - ‘Watchmaker’s Brooch’ – from ‘Explore’ Collection in brass, chain, stainless steel and corked glass vials 

 

Darcey Skelly, National College of Art and Design, Dublin‘Voyages of the Starship Stetson’ – a collision of two iconic fictional genres, Sci-Fi and the Western, paired in a crazy creation of her own imagining. Her concept, if the Cowboys of the Old West found a way to propel themselves into Space to colonise a planet. Darcey describes herself as ‘an illustrative maker’, a storyteller who aims to show there is more to a piece than meets the eye!

 Darcey Skelly, National College of Art and Design, Dublin  Space Cows From Space - Necklace   Darcey Skelly, National College of Art and Design, Dublin  Space Cows From Space – Necklace

Sheng Zhang, Birmingham School of Jewellery – winner of the New Designers Goldsmiths’ Company Silversmithing Award 2016  is influenced by minimalist art and contemporary architecture. Shafts of light slice through finely crafted incisions in his series of supremely elegant geometric brooches and vessels – all darkly oxidised with glinting gold edges.
« Sheng Zhang is influenced by minimalist art and inspired by contemporary architecture. His passion concentrates on the exploration and expression of the relationship between internal and external spaces with significant contrasting elements such as forms, textures and colours.
The collection involves the utilisation of highlighted incisions and openings to imply and emphasise the link of internal and external space, as well as introducing light as an indicator of different spaces to allow the viewer to look through and explore the entire piece. This also strengthens the visual response, captures attention and produces curiosity for the viewer.
By employing simple geometric forms and contrasting colours, Sheng demonstrates a minimal style and visual language, which reflects his personality, philosophy and personal aesthetic.
Each piece is unique as a result of a carefully controlled and purposely structured making process. All the pieces are hand made in metal with appropriate techniques including plating and oxidising. The collection consists of functional and non-functional items. »

Sheng Zhang, Birmingham School of Jewellery - ‘Inside Out’ – brooches in oxidised gilding metal Sheng Zhang, Birmingham School of Jewellery – ‘Inside Out’ – brooches in oxidised gilding metal

Sheng (Shawn) Zhang Brooch: Sheng Zhang Brooch – gilding metal, oxidising 2016

Felicity Lynden, University of Edinburgh - 'Ruins' necklace in resin embedded with iron oxide and steel mesh, with white metal and stainless wire Felicity Lynden, University of Edinburgh – ‘Ruins’ necklace in resin embedded with iron oxide and steel mesh, with white metal and stainless wire

 

Freya Alder, Glasgow School of Art
« I am a designer, maker and jeweller based in Glasgow. My work tends to be informal, relatively un-precious and playful. I recently graduated from the design school at Glasgow School of art specialising in silversmithing and jewellery.
This work originally sprang from my love of illustrating the female form. I enjoy the long linear lines that so quickly represent a woman. With something like five strokes of a pen one can conjure a form, and a character within that form.
The subject of the nude woman is fraught with conflicts. The female form is often reductively objectified and generally devalued. I want my work to have a humour and an informality that isn’t often afforded to the subject of the naked women or indeed the discipline of jewellery »

Freya Alder, Glasgow School of Art - Brass Ladies – brooches hand pierced in brass Freya Alder, Glasgow School of Art – Brass Ladies – brooches hand pierced in brass

Freya Alder, Glasgow School of Art - Brass Ladies – brooches hand pierced in brass - The subject of the nude woman is fraught with conflicts. The female form is often reductively objectified and generally devalued. I want my work to have a humour and an informality that isn't often afforded to the subject of the naked women or indeed the discipline of jewellery: Freya Alder, Glasgow School of Art – Brass Ladies – brooches hand pierced in brass – The subject of the nude woman is fraught with conflicts. The female form is often reductively objectified and generally devalued. I want my work to have a humour and an informality that isn’t often afforded to the subject of the naked women or indeed the discipline of jewellery

Hayley Brooks, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee - the peaceful expansive landscapes of the Scottish wilds are captured in her sensitive collection of chokers and bangles – microscopic details of lichen covered rocks appear in richly textured soft silicone contrasting with sleek silver – ‘a personal souvenir – enabling the wearer to carry with them something of the peace and solace found in the Scottish landscape.’
« The Scottish landscape provides peacefulness, an opportunity to free your mind, and access to silence. A stark contrast to the every day hustle and bustle of city life. Through photography I capture things that interest me ranging from the textures and details in the rocks found at my feet to the wider expansive landscapes that give us a sense of place. I am interested in the natural reflection of the landscape in the details of the rocks – the macroscopic in the microscopic!
Through this innovative collection of contemporary jewellery I aim to raise awareness of the beauty of the Scottish landscape, as I want other people see what I can see in the rocks and stones. These immensely wearable pieces, combine alternative materials such as silicone and precious metal, and also act as a personal souvenir – enabling the wearer to carry something of the peace and solace found in the Scottish landscape. »

Hayley Brooks, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee - Choker in silicone, anodised aluminium and silver -  Hayley Brooks, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee: -  Choker in silicone, anodised aluminium and silver -

Hayley Brooks Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design, Dundee – Choker in silicone, anodised aluminium and silver 

 

New Tastes introduces twelve new jewellery graduates: Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art; Hayley Brooks, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee; Chen Cheng, Birmingham School of Jewellery; Rob Anderson, Sheffield Hallam University; Sheng Zhang, Birmingham School of Jewellery; Darcey Skelly, National College of Art and Design, Dublin; Francesca Lobb, Manchester School of Art; Felicity Lynden, University of Edinburgh; Freya Alder, Glasgow School of Art; Stephanie O Leary, Middlesex University, London; Michaela Murrain, De Montfort University, Leicester; Amanda Denison, Winchester School of Art.

 

KATH LIBBERT JEWELLERY GALLERY
Salts Mill, Saltaire,
Bradford BD18 3LA. – UK
Tel/Fax 01274 599790.
info@kathlibbertjewellery.c…
www.kathlibbertjewellery.co.uk

OPEN DAILY 10 – 5.30 MON – FRI and 10 – 6 AT WEEKENDS

 

Enregistrer

20/04/2013

Coup de Coeur : « Impossible Landscapes » by Montserrat Lacomba

« Impossible Landscapes » Series

by Montserrat Lacomba

« Paisajes Imposibles » es una serie de joyas que empecé en noviembre de 2012 y en la que estoy actualmente trabajando. Esta serie está basada en los paisajes que me rodean y con referencias a pintores y poetas que han tratado el tema del paisaje. »

« Impossible Landscapes » is a series of jewels that I started in November 2012 and continue to work on. The series is based on the landscapes that surround me with references to the painters and poets who treated the topic of landscape. »

Montserrat Lacomba - the 'Impossible Landscapes' serie

« It is impossible to understand art separated from feelings. It is a precise manifestation of reflections to be expressed and shared with others.  Art is uneasiness.
Painter Joaquim Mir remained captivated by the landscape of Torrent de Pareis on the island of Majorca and over time he searched for places from which one could see landscapes never previously painted.
Poet Jacint Verdaguer, of whom Joan Maragall wrote “no one knows the aspect of our land more than he,” in his notebooks of excursions to the Pyrenees had annotated descriptions of the landscape, orientative sketches, linguistic observations, writings and annotations that he would later use in the “Canigó” and others of his literary works.
The “Impossible Landscapes” series is born mainly from the admiration I feel for the painters and artists who have extensively treated the topic of landscape throughout the years, since it stopped being merely the background of the picture but instead became the focus of the work.  The same holds true for my recognition of the writers who make us imagine and transport us to unknown lands that we each come to know and interpret in our own way.
When we are surrounded by the landscape, our view gets lost into the infinite where there are no limits.  When we frame a fragment of landscape through a window or with a camera, however, that fragment assumes another sense and we make it ours.  Loving the land and surrounding landscape has led me to seek new landscapes that, once captured, become impossible. I move them to small wearable pieces, like windows, that invite the viewer to imagine and fantasize. »

Brooch "Mediterranean Sea" from the "Impossible Landscapes" series. 7 x 9,5 x 0.5 cm Oxidized nickel silver and enameled copper.Montserrat Lacomba – Brooch « Mediterranean Sea » from the « Impossible Landscapes » series. 7 x 9,5 x 0.5 cm Oxidized nickel silver and enameled copper.

Brooch  "Words and Landscapes (to Jacint Verdaguer, poet)"  5.5 x 9.5 x 1.5 cm  Engraved and enameled copper. oxidized copper and silver.Brooch  « Words and Landscapes (to Jacint Verdaguer, poet) »  5.5 x 9.5 x 1.5 cm  Engraved and enameled copper. oxidized copper and silver.

Brooch  "Montsenyserrat Mountain"  9 x 9 x 1.5 cm  Enameled and oxidized copper and silver.Brooch  « Montsenyserrat Mountain »  9 x 9 x 1.5 cm  Enameled and oxidized copper and silver.

Brooch "Roots of the Mountain" from the "Impossible Landscapes" series. 3 x 9 x 1 cm Oxidized nickel silver and engraved and enameled copper.Brooch « Roots of the Mountain » from the « Impossible Landscapes » series. 3 x 9 x 1 cm Oxidized nickel silver and engraved and enameled copper.

Brooch  "Worked Land" from the "Impossible Landscapes" series.  4 x 8 x 0,7 cm  Nickel silver and enameled copper. Brooch  « Worked Land » from the « Impossible Landscapes » series.  4 x 8 x 0,7 cm  Nickel silver and enameled copper.

Brooch  "The Square Lake and a Window"  7.5 x 8.5 x 1.5 cm Nickel silver and enameled copperBrooch  « The Square Lake and a Window »  7.5 x 8.5 x 1.5 cm Nickel silver and enameled copper

and some « Impossible earrings » (IMPOSSIBLE not to love them !!!)

Montserrat Lacomba - Earrings  eIL2  Enameled and oxidized copper and silver.  40x17x8 mm.Montserrat Lacomba (Mar de Color Rosa)  Earrings - eIL6  Enameled and oxidized copper and silver.  47x14x1 mm.Montserrat Lacomba - Earrings  eIL1  Enameled and oxidized copper and silver.  42x25x1 mm.

Earrings -  Enameled and oxidized copper and silver

Image de prévisualisation YouTube

27/05/2012

EXPO ‘The RING’ – TESTA gallery, Sofia (BG) – 12-27 Mai 2012

THE RING - jewellery exhibition

TESTA gallery’s exhibition will present rings by 16 jewelers, each of whom will show three to six pieces.

The Ring - Sofia (BG)

Participants: Angelina Tsvetkova — Antoaneta Petrova — Atanas Konstantinov — Bogdana Topreva — Vanya Dimitrova — Viktor Pavlov — Dimitar DeltchevDora HaralambakiEvgeniya TsankovaEmanuela Deyanova — Kalina Tchankova — Neva BalnikovaNikolay SardamovSabrina Hauser — Teodor Lultchev — Zwetelina Aleksieva

The exhibition wil open on May 12th, Saturday, at TESTA gallery, 8 Shishman St, from 12 pm to 6 pm, and will run through May 27th.

Simply an adornment, vanity, or an object to wear with a specific message, the ring has the potential to say a lot of things. Inspired by different aspects of life and the world around us, it can show attitude and require attitude, express position, surprise and stimulate both the mind and the feelings. Used as a symbol of power, social status, or religion, in contemporary times the ring is to a greater extent an expression of one’s own identity. Regardless of whether it is made of silver, gold, platinum and precious stones or alternative materials used in unpredictable ways, the ring is eager to say: “I love you, I am beautiful, I am rich, I hate you, I come from Ireland or Austria, I have enough, I am taken, I am funny, I am scared, I am important, I can’t help you. I am.”

 EXPO 'The RING' - TESTA gallery, Sofia (BG) - 12-27 Mai 2012 dans Bogdana TOPREVA (BG) THE-RINGEmanuela Deyanova – ring « shaving » – synthetic hair, paint, felt, silver

Emanuela DeyanovaEmanuela Deyanova – ring »5 ways to paint in red » – paint, felt, aluminium, silver, synthetic hair

Neva Balnikova

 Neva Balnikova ‘Ugly’ – polymer clay, silver electroforming, amethyst

Sabrina Hauser, ring "Palma"Sabrina Hauser, ring « Bali » – silver, oxidised

Evgeniya Tsankova - "tied" - aluminium, cottonEvgeniya Tsankova – « tied » – aluminium, cotton
Evgeniya Tsankova, "Tied"  Materials: aluminium, cottonEvgeniya Tsankova, « Tied »  – aluminium, cotton
5_857
Vanya Dimitrova – Ring « Colourful captured memories » – Coat powdered copper, textile, rubber
Bogdana ToprevaBogdana Topreva – « nature » – silver, moss
Bogdana Topreva - "nature" - silver, mossBogdana Topreva – « nature » – silver, moss
Dimitar DeltchevDimitar Deltchev - aluminium, balloon
Teodor LultchevTeodor Lultchev – « Communication » - sterling silver, steel
Dora HaralambakiDora Haralambaki - « my country my sea » – glazed porcelain

  Nikolai Sardamov ringsNikolai Sardamov rings

Victor PavlovVictor Pavlov

 

 

TESTA gallery
8 Ulitsa Tsar Shishman
Sofia, Bulgaria 1000
tel 00 359 88 764 8973
testagallery@gmail.comhttp://testagallery.com

 

02/08/2011

«Cheveu un bijou !!!» hurle la Dame de Coeur

«!Tranchez-lui la tête!!! Cheveu un bijou!!!» hurle la Dame de Coeur, dans Alice …

mais … faut pas se faire de cheveux dans la vie !! ici, on est à un poil du bijou ….. si ce ne sont pas des bijoux au poil !! ;-)

Au-delà du dégoût que peut susciter l’emploi d’un tel matériau (à la « grande époque » du bijou en cheveux, à l’époque Victorienne, mode lancée par la très romantique Reine Victoria, cet engouement eu un grand succès dans les pays anglo-saxons mais suscita du dégoût et un certain rejet en France et dans le reste de l’Europe), ce n’est pas étonnant, à mon sens, qu’il suscite tant d’attrait parmi la jeune génération de bijoutiers : à force d’interroger le rapport du bijou au corps, le corps s’incorpore petit à petit au bijou lui-même.

 

Tiffany Parbs – Extension (2008) – hand woven hair, digital print – photo Terence Bogue: Tiffany Parbs, Piece, 2008:

 Tiffany Parbs – Extension (2008) – hand woven hair, digital print – photo Terence Bogue

« Contemporary art is getting hairy Long and silky; short and curly. Blond, brunette, red or grey. It’s hair and it has an important part in our perceptions of ourselves. It defines gender and visual identity, and is playing an important role lately in art — in jewelry, drawings or in mixed media pieces. Hair has long had a role in the work of artists and artisans. In the Victorian era, creating jewelry from hair became almost as popular as knitting or crocheting.  By using one’s own hair or that of a beloved family member women were able to design bracelets, chains, rings and earrings. Apart from jewelry, mourners would weave hair into decorative, memorial wall hangings. By the early 1900s using hair fell out of fashion. During the past 15 years, however, there’s been a fascination among contemporary artists using skin, nail clippings, urine and hair to create various forms of art. Fascinated with Victorian hair jewelry, artist and jewelry designer Melanie Bilenker has revived the art form. Like the Victorians who kept lockets of hair and miniature portraits painted with ground hair and pigment to secure the memory of a lost love, renders the « quiet minutes, the mundane, the domestic, the ordinary moments » from her own tresses. Bilenker observes various daily activities such as cleaning, bathing, dressing, resting or eating. She chronicles the private moments by setting the camera’s timer and goes about her business which can be anything such as eating chocolate, writing a note or enjoying a Saturday morning breakfast. Once she has the photographed images, Bilenker creates tracings of the forms within ghem with thousands of tiny strands of her own hair – which are eventually fixed in resin.  She meticulously layers several different drawings to give the appearance of depth, one as foreground, another as background.  The entire process takes the course of about a week of laying hairs, mixing resin, and then allowing it to cure.  Says Bilenker, « Once the hairs are set as line drawings within resin, I shape, smooth and polish the exterior.  I then fabricate the jewelry findings and set them.  The piece is then complete. »" (Courtesy Melanie Bilenker and Sienna Gallery)

Melanie Bilenker Jewelry:   Oh, and they're made from human hair.: Melanie Bilenker (courtesy of Sienna Gallery) - miniature portraits painted with ground hair

hair jewelry by Melanie Bilenker: Melanie Bilenker

« Note » by Melanie Bilenker (courtesy of Sienna Gallery) - miniature portraits painted with ground hair: Each line in these drawings by Melanie Bilenker are made using strands of the artist’s own hair! The delicate drawings depict quiet scenes of domestic life which are sealed in Victorian-inspired brooches and rings.

 Galatée Pestre -Broche dans le sens du poil: Galatée Pestre- Le Sens des Bijoux – Broche ‘Dans le Sens du Poil’ – argent, poils, inox (photo by flavorflavy)

galatée Pestre - broche poils: Galatée Pestre- Le Sens des Bijoux – Broche ‘Dans le Sens du Poil’ (detail)

Nicola Scholz  Necklace: Untitled 2006  Pubic hair, gold: Nicola Scholz  Necklace: Untitled 2006  Pubic hair, gold

Rodrigo Acosta - necklace - pelo natural: Rodrigo Acosta – necklace – pelo natural

Rodrigo Acosta Arias  Lo permisivo de tu Dios, 2009.  Pendientes,pelo,latón, plata.  Fotos: Adolfo López      El cabello como armar de seducción y poder en el contexto de las distintas religiones a las que el hombre quiere pertenecer.  El pelo y lo prohibido, el pelo y la sabiduría, el pelo y la lujuria, el pelo y lo permisivo de tu Dios.: Rodrigo Acosta-  « Lo permisivo de tu Dios », 2009.  Pendientes,pelo,latón, plata.  Fotos: Adolfo López  -   El cabello como armar de seducción y poder en el contexto de las distintas religiones a las que el hombre quiere pertenecer.  El pelo y lo prohibido, el pelo y la sabiduría, el pelo y la lujuria, el pelo y lo permisivo de tu Dios

Agnes Larsson, necklace, hair jewelry: Agnes Larsson, necklace, hair jewelry 2015

Agnes Larsson, necklace, hair jewelry - Remains 9, 2015, necklace, calf skin, aluminum, horse hair, 16 x 9 x 1.25 inches ("Agnes Larsson - Remains" EXHIBITION at Ornamentum gallery  August 8 – September 7, 2015 ): Agnes Larsson, necklace, hair jewelry – Remains 9, 2015, necklace, calf skin, aluminum, horse hair, 16 x 9 x 1.25 inches (« Agnes Larsson – Remains » EXHIBITION at Ornamentum gallery  August 8 – September 7, 2015 )

Carolina Hornauer Necklace: The collector 2009 Cotton thread, synthetic cotton, river pearls, silver, patina, steel wire, enamel on cooper, magnets, burned wood, tinted hair, parts constructed, silver ball chain, silver tube textured, stone, silver charcoal (casting piece): Carolina Hornauer Necklace: The collector 2009 Cotton thread, synthetic cotton, river pearls, silver, patina, steel wire, enamel on cooper, magnets, burned wood, tinted hair, parts constructed, silver ball chain, silver tube textured, stone, silver charcoal (casting piece)

Carla Castiajo brooch Auto Portrait, 2007 gold, hair70 x 50 x 10 mm (via Contemporary jewellery - brooches) Carla Castiajo -  brooch « Auto Portrait », 2007 – gold, hair

Carla Castiajo   "horror vacui"  "Full of you"   brooch 6 x 5 x 3 cm   Gold, hair: Carla Castiajo   « horror vacui »  « Full of you »   brooch (back) 6 x 5 x 3 cm   Gold, hair

Katie Wightman | Exploring the fragility of the female form. Experiencing hair loss as the result of illness, Katie uses precious metals and human hair to release the stigma and create pieces with a new found sense of beauty and power.Katie Wightman | Exploring the fragility of the female form. Experiencing hair loss as the result of illness, Katie uses precious metals and human hair to release the stigma and create pieces with a new found sense of beauty and power.

"Purity" 2008 Tiina Rajakallio - human hair: Tiina Rajakallio « Purity » 2008 – human hair

Monika Strasser – Hair Brooch 2012 - Hair, rubber, silver, steel – Series: On Beauty: Monika Strasser – Hair Brooch 2012 - Hair, rubber, silver, steel – Series: On Beauty

Maho Takahashi - central st Martins 2012 - “Celebration necklace” Human hair, glue: Maho Takahashi  – “Celebration necklace” Human hair, glue - Central st Martins 2012

Noon Passama - KNOBS - graduate project 2010 - Brooch and Lucia King's portrait: photography - DAN/NAD: Noon Passama – KNOBS – graduate project 2010 – Brooch (“Black Hair Knob” brooch, 2010. Antelope fur, sheepskin, silver.) and Lucia King’s portrait: photography – DAN/NAD

Mielle Harvey - Hair Colored Red: 1998, ca. 14in, human hair, dye, bone: Mielle Harvey – Hair Colored Red: 1998, ca. 14in, human hair, dye, bone (série « city tribal amulets »)

Mielle Harvey - City Tribal amulets serie - Blond Hair and Pearls: 1998, ca. 14in, human hair, pearls, 14k gold: Mielle Harvey (série « city tribal amulets« ) – Blond Hair and Pearls: 1998, ca. 14in, human hair, pearls, 14k gold

Marie Pendaries - "Boucle d’or"  Collier. Cheveu et or (hair & gold necklace): Marie Pendariès - Boucle d’or. Collier. Cheveu et or (gold & hair necklace)
Claire Baloge - "mais, vous avez un poil dans la main !"  2005  Hair, silver: Claire Baloge - « mais, vous avez un poil dans la main ! »  2005  Hair, silver
Claire Baloge - "Mes Tendres Poils"  -  2005 - hair, natural fibers, oxydated copper   Claire Baloge - « Mes Tendres Poils »  -  2005 – hair, natural fibers, oxydated copper   
 Marie Masson - necklace Cravate 2011, silver, horse hair, ribbon: Marie Masson – necklace Cravate 2011, silver, horse hair, ribbon
Marie Masson, France Brooch, Toiletrie 04 Hair transplant, 2013 Latex, horse hair, semolina, leather, 7,5 x 5 cm Leatherwork technics, embroidery, jewellery technics. photo : Marie Masson: Marie Masson, France Brooch, Toiletrie 04 Hair transplant, 2013 Latex, horse hair, semolina, leather, 7,5 x 5 cm Leatherwork technics, embroidery, jewellery technics. photo : Marie Masson
Eun Yeong Jeong -'Growth' from Growth series - copper, wool, wood, horse hair: Eun Yeong Jeong -’Growth’ from Growth series – copper, wool, wood, horse hair

Farah Bandookwala  - redhead neckpiece - sterling silver, fake hair    Farah Bandookwala (UK) redhead neckpiece – silver, fake hair

Farah Bandookwala (UK) –  "which one are you today ?" neckpiece 2007 - silver, fake hair  http://farahbjewellery.files.wordpress.com/2010/06/which-one-are-you-today-neckpiece3.jpg?w=460Farah Bandookwala (UK) « which one are you today ? »  neckpiece – 2007 – silver, fake hair 

FARAH BANDOOKWALA -blue hair brooch  Farah Bandookwala (UK) – blue hair brooch

FARAH BANDOOKWALA - platinum ring Farah Bandookwala (UK) « platinum » ring

Sint Lucas Antwerpen School - JOYA 2012 - Sandra Buyck: Sandra Buyck - fake hair neckpiece – Sint Lucas Antwerpen School – JOYA 2012

Clémentine Despocq - 'Vénus' - Parure de corps/Body ornament - Laiton, cheveux synthétiques/ Brass, synthetic hair  - (AFEDAP ) 2010: Clémentine Despocq – ‘Vénus’ – Parure de corps/Body ornament – Laiton, cheveux synthétiques/ Brass, synthetic hair  – (AFEDAP ) 2010

Olivia Creber - "Keeping Schtum" - resin, acrylic, brown horse hair - Edinburgh College of Art 2013: Olivia Creber - « Keeping Schtum » – resin, acrylic, brown horse hair – Edinburgh College of Art 2013

Roxane Amirouche  PERSONA - 2012  Masque de nuit  Laiton, cuir retourné, cheveux synthétiques,  Elastique  crédit photo Patricia Lemaire (diplome AFEDAP 2012): Roxane Amirouche  PERSONA – 2012  Masque de nuit  Laiton, cuir retourné, cheveux synthétiques,  Elastique  crédit photo Patricia Lemaire (diplome AFEDAP Paris 2012)

Ana Carolina Escobar (AFEDAP 2012) "chez moi chez moi" doble 3- cheveux , laiton, film thermopastique, papier: Ana Carolina Escobar (AFEDAP 2012) collier « chez moi chez moi »- cheveux , laiton, film thermopastique, papier

Julia ValleJulia Valle (Bresil) – hairy accessories

Mona Hatoum, Hair Necklace, 1995 - detail "human thoughts may not be what they appear to be at 1st glance, an idea that this necklace, made from the artist's hair, play with": Mona Hatoum, Hair Necklace, 1995 – detail « human thoughts may not be what they appear to be at 1st glance, an idea that this necklace, made from the artist’s hair, play with » 

Castle in the Air / ÕhuLoss.   - Kadri Mälk Brooch: Lossylong, 2013 Darkened silver, human hair, purple spinel: Kadri Mälk (Castle in the Air / ÕhuLoss) Brooch: Lossylong, 2013 Darkened silver, human hair, purple spinelPolly Van der Glas (AU) – hair jewelry – Sterling silver cast human hair plait necklace & Human hair knuckle ring 2008: Polly Van der Glas (AU) – hair jewelry – Sterling silver cast human hair plait necklace & Human hair knuckle ring 2008

Polly van der Glas -'red hair neckpiece' 2008 Polly van der Glas -’red hair neckpiece’ 2008  -oxidised copper, red Human hair, oxidised sterling silver

Polly van der Glas (AU)  -  Since 2005 my work has centered on materials that were once attached to our bodies: human hair, teeth and fingernails. These materials were at one time part of an intimate, elaborate maintenance ritual.: Polly van der Glas (AU)  -  Since 2005 my work has centered on materials that were once attached to our bodies: human hair, teeth and fingernails. These materials were at one time part of an intimate, elaborate maintenance ritual.

Juan Harnie - (MAD) - Hair (2014) Brooches & necklaces. Resin, human hair, elastic band, silver.: Juan Harnie – (MAD) – Hair (2014) Brooches & necklaces. Resin, human hair, elastic band, silver

Juan Harnie - Hair (2014) Brooches & necklaces. Resin, human hair, elastic band, silver.: Juan Harnie – Hair (2014) Brooches & necklaces. Resin, human hair, elastic band, silver

Untitled ("a hairy tale"), Nina Khazani, Human hair, gold-plated brass and linen - Royal College of Art 2012 dregree show: Nina Khazani, Untitled (« a hairy tale ») – Human hair, gold-plated brass and linen – Royal College of Art 2012 dregree show

Anna Schwamborn, who has worked for Alexander McQueen and Vivienne Westwood and is studying at Central St Martins in London, uses real human hair and human ashes mixed with black bone china. Moxern Mourning Jewellery: Anna Schwamborn, who has worked for Alexander McQueen and Vivienne Westwood and is studying at Central St Martins in London, uses real human hair and human ashes mixed with black bone china. Moxern Mourning Jewellery - Mourning jewelry, bracelet, human cremated ashes mixed with black bone china, human hair, « Wearable body pieces including human material « Morning Objects – The collection of objects contains post-mortem memorial pieces which include aspects of a deceased corpse, namely hair and cremated ashes »

Alchimia Gallery presents Chiara Cavallo "Disturbs" - my curly hair, nylon tube, thread: Chiara Cavallo « Disturbs » – my curly hair, nylon tube, thread (Alchimia)

Géraldine Luttenbacher -NOIR comme BASALTE 2015: Géraldine Luttenbacher - at « NOIR comme BASALTE » 2015

Sylvia Burgoa -’Raiponce–La Colère’/'Rapunzel–Anger’ -- Broche et Collier/Brooch and necklace -- Argent, photographies acetate, fil d’or, fil d’argent, cuir/Silver, photographic acetate, gold thread, silver thread, leather: Sylvia Burgoa -’Raiponce–La Colère’/'Rapunzel–Anger’ – Broche et Collier/Brooch and necklace – Argent, photographies acetate, fil d’or, fil d’argent, cuir/Silver, photographic acetate, gold thread, silver thread, leather – 2010

«Cheveu un bijou !!!» hurle la Dame de Coeur dans Agnes LARSSON (SE) Gejaagd-door-de-Wind-Willemstijn-2Francis Willemstijn- Gejaagd door de Wind, Zuiderzeemuseum – 2009 – Collier – Haar (human hair), git, glas, zilver, textiel Collectie Zuiderzeemuseum, Enkhuizen, NL

Francis Willemstijn - bracelet "Hair", from "gone with the wind" - silver, jet, glass, human hair, textile: Francis Willemstijn – bracelet « Hair », from « gone with the wind » – silver, jet, glass, human hair, textile

 Amy Tavern -Forget Me Not sterling silver, spray paint, picture of my father, my father's hair - detail: Amy Tavern - »Forget Me Not » sterling silver, spray paint, picture of my father, my father’s hair – detailAna Goalabré - bagues 'j'aimerais tant passer mes doigts dans tes cheveux' 1997 Ana Goalabré – J’aimerais tant passer mes doigts dans tes cheveux – Cheveux et résine – 1997  tous droits réservés.
« Puisant dans la tradition des bijoux en cheveux, matériau depuis longtemps collecté dans des foires et marchés ou dans l’intimité des familles pour devenir parure, Ana Goalabré se joue de cet usage en coupant une de ses mèches et en y taillant une bague qu’elle envoie à un homme accompagnée de la missive «J’aimerais tant passer mes doigts dans tes cheveux». Cette phrase, appel érotique d’un corps d’artiste, devient le titre d’une série déclinant divers contenus aimants et sensuels, traditionnellement gardés jusqu’alors implicites au nom d’une morale et d’une bienséance rigoureuse et qui tout à coup semblent avoir gagné le droit de dire clairement le désir, qu’il s’agisse de celui d’une mère, d’un père, d’une amante, d’un amant… et ce dans toute sa trivialité. Pourtant, il n’y a aucune charge obscène dans ces bagues. Qu’elles soient très travaillées ou reprennent le mouvement naturel d’une mèche de cheveux, elles nous renvoient à nos jeux tactiles dans les cheveux de l’autre, en fixant le mouvement, image arrêtée puis détachée du corps pour n’en garder que la sensation. »
(Monique Manoha – Actes du colloque international Projections : des organes hors du corps (13-14 octobre 2006)

Rickson Salkeld   Rickson Salkeld – I am interested in the feminine ideal in relation to the female body.  I enjoy creating work that expresses my wish to both conform and  rebel against ideas of femininity. Through various materials and  processes I take from my own body both physically and metaphorically.  Hair can be used to comment on feminine allure and power, while  clear resin is used to symbolize an abundance of tears

 Azahara Santoro - Tricomotealcyalgenfobia- Miedo irracional al pelo de las mariposas de coral plateado. Piezas unicas  Azahara Santoro  (EASD Valencia 2012) -   bagues avec cheveux (rings with hair) 
Tricomotealcyalgenfobia- Miedo irracional al pelo de las mariposas de coral plateado. Piezas unicas

maria ignacia walker - MFA JEWELLERY AND BODY ORNAMENTS Alchimia contemporary jewellery School 2013 - 2015: Maria Ignacia Walker – MFA JEWELLERY AND BODY ORNAMENTS Alchimia contemporary jewellerySchool 2013 – 2015 –   A simple fact of life that María Ignacia Walker obsesses over: The shedding of hair. The obsession – losing them, collecting them, ordering them, measuring them and archiving them. The desire – to preserve these losses – It gives rise to “transcendieron”.  The discourse is not about beauty and it is not about sensuality, not even about cultural symbols that hair carries.  How much hair do you lose constantly, everyday ? How many pieces grow out of your body and die every moment ?  “The transcendents” are a homage to the moments when you lose your hair. Captured and immortalized in the fragility of the porcelain, they give perpetuity and freeze all their expressions in the moment of their detachment from the body. With a threading method, the artist uses horsehair as connectors. They show the lightness, energy and freedom, while demonstrating the real, natural movement of the hair. Together with the act of keeping and protecting the hair in a porcelain form, they are given another life that keeps them present through their absence.

Maria Ignacia Walker  - 2015 - TRASCENDIERON - Materials: Porcelain / Horsehair / Resin / Gold thread / Gold: Maria Ignacia Walker  – 2015 – TRASCENDIERON – Materials: Porcelain / Horsehair / Resin / Gold thread/ Gold

María Ignacia Walker Contemporary Jewellery - 2015 - TRASCENDIERON: María Ignacia Walker  – 2015 – TRASCENDIERON

María Ignacia Walker   - 2015 - TRASCENDIERON: María Ignacia Walker  – 2015 – TRASCENDIERON

Maria Ignacia Walker Trascendieron 1 2015 Necklace-object, 28 x 45 cm, porcelain, horse hair and resin Photo by Marcos Bucco, courtesy of the artist: Maria Ignacia Walker – 2015 – TRASCENDIERON – Necklace-object, 28 x 45 cm, porcelain, horse hair and resin Photo by Marcos Bucco, courtesy of the artist

Maria Ignacia Walker - 2015 - TRASCENDIERON - necklace (detail)Maria Ignacia Walker – 2015 – TRASCENDIERON – necklace (detail)

Sébastien Carré - collection Hair Landscape - 2016: Sébastien Carré – collection Hair Landscape – 2016 broche (bijoux réalisés pour une collaboration avec le blogger Cut by Fred )

MARION DELARUE-FR Mania-Traditional korean lacquer, korean hair. 2011  MARION DELARUE - Mania :

MARION DELARUE — « Mania » – Traditional korean lacquer, korean hair. 2011 « During my stay in South Korea, I was struck by Korean ladies’ habits of playing with their hair fringes. As soon as they had the chance they would roll up their hair by making it slide between their forefinger and their middle finger and then pull on it softly. Since I was often bored during such long classes taught in a language I don’t understand, I spent time observing the students… »

Dionea Rocha Watt Pendant: Protection Locket, 2006 Silver, human hair 3.1 x 5.5 cm Piece for section History, Memory, Tradition: Dionea Rocha Watt Pendant: Protection Locket, 2006 Silver, human hair 3.1 x 5.5 cm Piece for section History, Memory, Tradition (at  « Think Twice: New Latin American Jewellery » 2010-2011)

Dionea Rocha Watt (Brazil) - locket/hair.: Dionea Rocha Watt (Brazil) – locket/hair

Raluca Buzura’s collection, “Hairy Tales” comes out of an imaginary world and it’s a combination of new materials such as polymeric rubber, pumice, artificial leather and artificial hair.   Raluca Buzura, “Hairy Tales”, Romania  Here come the Authors! 7 - 8 November | Sala Dalles | Bucharest: Raluca Buzura’s collection, “Hairy Tales” comes out of an imaginary world and it’s a combination of new materials such as polymeric rubber, pumice, artificial leather and artificial hair.  
at Autor 2015 – 7 – 8 November | Sala Dalles | Bucharest

Salome Lippuner  Neckpiece: Kin Kanshitsu 2008  Black and natural coloured Urushi on hemp-cloth,gold-leaves,horse tail hair  15 x 10 cm: Salome Lippuner  Neckpiece: Kin Kanshitsu 2008  Black and natural coloured Urushi on hemp-cloth,gold-leaves,horse tail hair  15 x 10 cm

REBECCA HANNON-USA Collier  Crin de cheval: REBECCA HANNON-USA Collier  Crin de cheval
REBECCA HANNON-USA -USA  Nest,Horse Hair Twist: REBECCA HANNON-USA -USA  Nest,Horse Hair Twist
AOI KOTSUHIROI AOI KOTSUHIROI - hair neckpiece – cabello humano en conjunto con piedras y pequeños cráneos
AOI KOTSUHIROI - hair neckpieceAOI KOTSUHIROI - hair neckpiece - cabello humano en conjunto con piedras y pequeños cráneos

 Aoi Kotsuhiroi Horse hair, horn, urushi lacquer and buffalo leather Aoi Kotsuhiroi Horse hair, horn, urushi lacquer and buffalo leather Vika Mayzel  (IL) - necklace (silver,wood,fur,leather)   Out of Cage vikamayzel.com: Vika Mayzel  (IL) – necklace (silver,wood,fur,leather)   Out of Cage vikamayzel.com

Lauren Passenti, Cleaning Fish on a Sunday Morning wrist piece, 2009, sterling silver, horse hair, 8 inches diameter: Lauren Passenti, « Cleaning Fish on a Sunday Morning » wrist piece, 2009, sterling silver, horse hair, 8 inches diameter

Eunmi Chun: Eunmi Chun, zebra, 2011, brooch, small intestine of cow, silver, human hair, gold leaf, 120 x 40 x 75 mm, photo: artist

 Brooch by Eun Mi Chun: Giraffe 2011 23 x 8 x 9 cm. Human hair, gold leaf, small intestine of cow, seeds, silver: Brooch by Eun Mi Chun: Giraffe 2011 23 x 8 x 9 cm. Human hair, gold leaf, small intestine of cow, seeds, silver

 

voir également les bijoux de Kerry Howley :

Decouverte : Kerry HOWLEY – Human hair as jewellery

Kerry Howley human hair jewelry - Kerry Howley Attraction/Aversion is a material exploration of how people can feel seemingly opposing emotional responses simultaneously. The necklaces are made of human hair, a familiar material that we take pride in. However once off of the body hair becomes an innate source of aversion.: Kerry Howley human hair jewelry
Kerry Howley Attraction/Aversion is a material exploration of how people can feel seemingly opposing emotional responses simultaneously. The necklaces are made of human hair, a familiar material that we take pride in. However once off of the body hair becomes an innate source of aversion.

 

 

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08/09/2010

EXPO ‘Making Treasure’ – Birmingham City University, Birmingham (UK) – 13-22 Sept 2010

« Making Treasure  »

REALLY, REALLY  …. TREASURES !!!!!!!!!!!!!!  :-)

« Fantastical edible creations, modern re-interpretations of historical decorative arts, rubber glove garments and wearable drawings, a selection of what will be showcased at Making Treasure, the MA Jewellery, Silversmithing and Related Products graduate exhibition opening on September 13th.
The exhibition is the culmination of the intensive one-year long course taught at the renowned School of Jewellery, Birmingham City University.
The international group of makers join together to present new and original work that pushes conventional boundaries that co-exist within sculpture, fashion and fine art. The work exhibited challenges preconceived ideas of what jewellery and objects can be in form, material, function and scale whilst displaying individual aesthetics, design methodologies and artistic points.  »

EXPO 'Making Treasure' - Birmingham City University, Birmingham (UK) - 13-22 Sept 2010 dans BIAD Birmingham (UK) postcard+for+ma+show

Artists:
Farrah Al-Dujaili, Laura Brannon (UK), Li-Chu Wu (Taiwan), Miriam Rowe (US), Ningrui Zhou (China), Xiaorui Zhang (China), Yu-Ching Huang (Taiwan), Yuhan Ye, Hsiang-Lin Lu (Taiwan), Natalie Smith (UK), Simon Pattinson, Yi Lei Li, Yi Liu (China), Yu-Ping Lin (Taiwan), Suchanan Chinanuvathana (Thailand).

 

« Not only is perception of ourselves, of others and the world around us, a source of inspiration, it also invites us into an active and dynamic engagement, which is deeply related to the things we make. Considerations of sculptural form, composition, material, function and aesthetics are enhanced by contemplations of meaning, emotional investments and intellectual content.
The creative work of the makers in this exhibition address aspects of the most vital issues in contemporary applied arts; in their questioning of established ideas of what constitutes adornment, how decoration should be defined and executed, these works engage the eye and the mind simultaneously. They appeal to the intellect, whilst eliciting an instantaneous sensual reaction of pleasure, a desire to touch, hold, use and wear.
MA Jewellery, Silversmithing & Related Products is the overall title of the course. This is however a very limited and traditional description when one considers the wide variety of products that are within the province of the designer who has knowledge and expertise in the area of personal ornaments, body signification and decorative metal objects. The variety of materials, manufacturing techniques and processes available to an artist or designer in this field is far larger and of much greater potential than is indicated by the term ‘jewellery and silversmithing’ and has some affinities with industrial design, fashion design, fine art and sculpture and is often informed by intellectual engagements like general philosophy, conceptualisation or critical theory.
Our course philosophy addresses the existing and potential relationships within this sector, and educates its students to recognize, identify, understand and operate within this diversity. The philosophy of the course is embodied within a structured project programme that requires students to address vocational and academic research in design by applying their developing abilities and interests to a wide range of issues. Design experiences include ideas generation focused through strategies for concept development, the analysis of design problems and reflection on the relationships between personal objectives, cultural values, market identities, prototyping techniques and new technologies, thus enhancing knowledge and understanding, as well as facilitating the formation of professional studio methodologies. «   (Professor Jivan Astfalck, PhD )

 

Farrah Al-Dujaili
My design methodology revolves around the act of drawing
as an intuitive and subconscious process; geometric and organic components ‘grow’ alongside each other to create visual contrasts. Through a palette of feminine and masculine symbols, heavily detailed flowers and geometric shapes and crosshatched lines hybrid forms are created; not overtly floral, but organic and playful.
My making is immersed in metalwork because of the material’s ability to be visually delicate but physically strong. Fragments are created and later constructed to create the idiosyncratic detailing that appears in my drawings. I work within an intuitive mix of drawing and making that crosses over and intertwines.
I apply drawing materials of pencil, crayons and watercolours to a surface of enamel paint. This gives an interesting material link to my design methodology, enforcing the dialogue between drawing and making.

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_szz00VVY2uE/S_WX_n_qc4I/AAAAAAAAAAs/zgjoqzmtM-g/s1600/mod4necklace.jpg
Farrah Al-Dujaili- Untitled 3,neckpiece, 2010. Copper, spray paint, acrylic paint, pastels, watercolour pencils, paper

 

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_szz00VVY2uE/S_WXQue_SXI/AAAAAAAAAAc/o-u5VbwnAAQ/s1600/image_three.jpg

Farrah Al-DujailiUntitled 2, Neckpiece, 2010. Copper, spray paint, thread.

 

Hsiang-Lin Lu
Rice is cheap, small, but vital
. I like the taste of rice, and the form of rice. I enjoy playing with the rice grains and placing them into different shapes. They are like bricks creating lush texture and speckled pattern.
In contrast, lace, delicate embroideries, and ribbons present the opulence and craftsmanship of aristocratic fashion. For some people, food is the only object they desire, unlike the ladies of the court who are chasing adorned shoes and beautiful garment or jewellery, the vast number of people need bread and water.
Rice is the food that most of the people in my country rely on. It is the symbol of living, a symbol that is cheap but essential, which is like potato or corn to others. The definition of ‘ordinary’ and ‘luxury’ at different levels of social status is contradictory and interesting. I use this ‘ordinary’ material to describe opulence, and also explore the meaning of value and preciousness in different contexts. The richness and tactile abundance in the texture of rice delivers a deluxe beauty in place of the lace and jewels. I use this cheap material to produce enchanting and original works.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_DDARWatdC2g/TFdf2L-fC-I/AAAAAAAAADQ/_OEQPH-fEMc/s1600/Large+Image-Zoe.jpg

Hsiang-Lin Lu- I’ve been doing my final project of MA degree recently. I try to use rice and other combinations to explore the potential of this material. Here is one of them

 

Laura Brannon
‘Deadlights’
I create Jewellery that is grotesque yet intriguing by using rubber, plastics and found objects. Symbols from our collective subconscious, weird imagery of clowns, costumes, monsters and madness have fuelled this idiosyncratic collection.
The objects show elements of play amongst those of fear- this ambiguity can give the viewer an uncomfortable feeling as it requires to engage with two contradictory ideas at the same time. This I find fascinating!
My making process is spontaneous but controlled. I use a wide range of materials including rubber, plastics, foam and found objects. These contrasting textures and clashing colours are amalgamated, allowing the pieces to develop sculpturally. The use of ready-mades gives structure to the work and increases uncanny feelings. We know these ready-mades but when they are positioned within this madness, they offer new perspectives- we have to take a second look.

 dans Exposition/Exhibition
Laura Brannon - furry brooch

 

Li-Chu Wu
Paper has, without doubt, many varied uses. However, multiple layered paper interests me with its subtle movement and tactile qualities. I aim to recreate the link between the material and its original source in the natural environment. Pure and organic elements reveal a delicate and subtle visual language. The pieces function both as wearable pieces of body adornment and as sculptural objects off the body. The soft and subdued tones of colour that I choose give a quiet, calm and contemplative quality to the pieces.
Time is an essential element through the making progress; time, nature and I form my works, meticulous working processes enable me to develop a range of elements, which create the compositions.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_7dcqwzhNSnk/TAgqfsfEjII/AAAAAAAAAFc/JftO1V4oG2s/s1600/R0018438-01.jpghttp://4.bp.blogspot.com/_7dcqwzhNSnk/TAgqhUM0onI/AAAAAAAAAF0/EnJ5Y5bhaKQ/s1600/R0018491-01.jpg
Li-Chu Wu- Brooch -paper, copper, paint and stain steel pin
Li-Chu Wu- Necklace -paper, ceramic and wire

 

Miriam Rowe
I am interested in the dialogue created when recognisable forms from the history of European fashion and the decorative arts are combined, changed, and reinterpreted in a modern material.
For this project I chose to focus on material research and development, exploring plaster as a primary material in jewellery. Plaster has long been used in architectural decoration, but the plaster I use has been chemically changed with modern products to create an altered material that is waterproof and suited for use in jewellery production. I explored surface enhancement and advanced construction techniques to further develop the jewellery. I developed my construction methods based on historical plasterwork, adapting these techniques to fit my personal design agenda.
The images and forms I use come directly from my photos and drawings, based on objects seen on my visits to museums and stately homes. My interest in the forms, patterns, and images from the rich history of European design inspires this collection of contemporary jewellery.

http://miriamrowe.files.wordpress.com/2010/06/p1070039.jpghttp://miriamrowe.files.wordpress.com/2010/06/p1070035.jpg
Miriam RoweGrey Ironwork Brooch – Pin detail &  Side

 

Natalie Smith
My work explores the ideas of growth, transformation and disintegration. I find inspiration in surrealist science fiction, which is rich in atmosphere and imagery. Many of the books describe apocalyptic landscapes and alternate worlds that are on the brink of geographical catastrophes. In these dramatic dreamscapes there are no utopias, emphasis is placed on mental explorations and evocative journeys of the isolated humans.
I create my pieces by combining permanent and temporary materials such as textiles and sugar. I like the pieces to have a constantly changing structure and once completed, begin their transient lives. Depending on how they are cared for they may dissolve in humid conditions, change colour or melt like an ice-lolly on a hot day revealing the materials underneath. The evolution of the work is something that interests me greatly. I do not attempt to try and control what happens to the pieces after they are finished. I like an element of surprise.

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Natalie Smith – Marvellous Medicine 1 -Brooch – 2010
Natalie Smith -‘Scrumdiddlyumptious’ Brooch, 2010

 

Ningrui Zhou
The theme behind my work is to create a “city in the sky”. My inspiration initially came from a plastic bag flying in the air which I saw when I looked up into the sky .This evoked a good feeling and I began to consider the concept and question of flying; why should jewellery not fly? My work evolved from this to become sculptural objects. I create objects from bamboo and Chinese rice paper, exploring form, shape and structure. The visual use of lines in the pieces, in the installation and images of my work build together an alternative city skyline. I hope people can find a feeling of freedom and escapism in my work. I express this idea by taking photographic views of the city and making short films to tell stories about my flying pieces.

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Simon Pattinson
My work derives from an exploration of the relationship between form and function. I look to create functional objects for the home which challenge and excite the user with designs which are serious yet play on their relationships. I have explored possibilities in form to create objects which invite interaction and arouse interest beyond mere function. Through these ideas I have created families of objects which communicate with one another and belong.
I look for relationships between materials, processes, colours and finishes, in different mediums including ceramics, metal and wood. I have used industrial processes to create some of the objects, whilst others have been developed using paper and card. When people interact with my work I want them to smile, to have fun with the objects, bringing joy to the relationship between object and user.

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Suchanan Chinanuvathana
“Line is a basic element that exists in nature as a structural feature such as branches of a tree, or as surface design, such as striping on a tiger or a seashell. It can also exist by implication, as the edge of forms or its silhouette”. (Joseph A. Gatto 1987)I am interested in linear form and structure; the way in which a simple component can be combined and connected to create complex patterns and forms. All of my pieces are created from only one element “line”. I use a combination of curved lines to create my own three-dimensional forms with my textured wire technique. I use my traditional fine jewellery skills to make sculptural and wearable jewellery by using precious metals with simple colour range to show the purity of the line and the structure. I aim to make each piece appear beautiful from all angles.

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Suchanan Chinanuvathana - bracelet 2010 – Mixed media

 

Xiaorui Zhang
My work explores exagerated form and flexible wearability. I am interested in the idea that clothes are usually dominant and jewellery secondary, worn as an accessory to add decoration. My enquiry reverses this concept. To show this emphasis I create large scale jewellery that attracts people’s attention and functions like an item of clothing.
I choose rubber gloves as my material, aiming to transform a mundane everyday item into beautiful and original objects. I explore special dyeing techniques on the rubber gloves. I aim to create a unique aesthetic combination of sculptural construction, dramatic colour and texture. I see my work as visually interesting pieces for every-day wearing.

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Xiaorui Zhang- Dyed rubber gloves, 14ct plated gold. (showed by flexible wearability)

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Xiaorui Zhang- Dyed rubber gloves jewelry

Yi Liu
My jewellery investigates notions of mourning and memorial jewellery, souvenirs that remember a loved one and which are a reminder to the living of the inevitability of death. I work predominately in plaster, which communicates a feeling of fragility related to our weak and transitory life.
Life is precious! I chose to work with tones of black, white and gray. These three tones are the background in my work and are combined with the highlights of copper and gold to form a contrast between preciousness and emptiness. I created images on plaster with symbols of death once used in Victorian mourning jewellery such as skulls, skeletons, and human hair, Memento Mori that are a warning against vanity.

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Yi Liufound objects, transfer, plaster, electroforming

 

Yi Lei Li
My inspiration comes from nature; the linear structure of plants is fascinating to me. I refine these natural shapes from my photographs of plants by overlaying line drawings. By using metal wire and crochet techniques I transfer graphic shapes into interesting and original three-dimensional structures to make wearable pieces of jewellery.
My collection is like a ‘garden’, every piece is unique with different colour, structure and other contrasts. They express feelings in the same way like in a real garden, where each kind of flower has its own beauty and character though they are different, they can enrich each other and be in harmony. In the process of exploring the linear structures and the balance between each piece and the whole group, I am trying to express the beauty I have found in nature.

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Yi Lei Li- copper wire, spray paint

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Yu-Ching Huang
My designs mirror myself and how I have been shaped by the people I have met.
I am looking for an answer to what might be a gentle and considerate.
Could silence be heard, even without talking?
Could virtue be seen, even without showing?
Could people not hurt each other, even though we all flawed?
Sometimes flowers and plants give me part of reply in the symbiotic relationships they have with other plants and organisms. Plants always have their individual characteristics but don’t interfere with each other. Maybe this is the reason I am fascinated by them.
I chose to use zips in my work to show the connections between people, events, things or places. People all want to connect and have graceful relationships like flowers in a garden.

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_pB5EecEsq-I/TIIoxOlUo7I/AAAAAAAAAEI/H_KbUYrVImE/s1600/autumn-b-2.jpgmywork-4 dans Farrah AL-DUJAILI (UK)
Yu-Ching Huang- Autumn 2 – & ‘Plant our dream’ necklace

 

Yuhan Ye
My work combines popular fashion elements and bold colour which relate to Pop Art. I organise these elements as collage and stylised images of fashion and beauty. I create my own images from these fashion elements using computer software. The colour range within the images helps me to bring my work together as a collection.
Together with the illustrations and bold colours, I have also designed electronic circuits to extend my jewellery into the realms of light and sound. Adding the electronics makes my work more playful and gives an added function which encourages interaction. My illustrations can be illuminated by the light when worn in a dark place. I have also added sound sensors to my work, so that my work can be changed by the volume of the speed of speech and music.

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Yuhan Ye- Light up ring 1

Yu- Ping Lin
My work is process-based and structurally complex. I am never without a sketchbook where my ideas evolve so I am constantly drawing with brush strokes. The inks sometimes bleed into the Chinese rice paper and at other times they develop into more in-depth ideas and detailed images.
I did not set out to be a fashion designer or to create artwork relating to environmental issues but as my portfolio developed and I became interested in both style and ecology. My work tends to focus on inspiration from nature, the notion of folding and pleating, architectural structures, interaction with people and seduction of pattern and colour; the original pleasure captured by the structure of organisms and forms inherent in nature.

 dans Grande-Bretagne (UK)
Yu- Ping Lin - Inherence in nature 5 – ‘mushroom’

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Yu- Ping Lin - ‘bloom’

 

Birmingham City University
Vittoria Street
B1 3PA – Birmingham
United Kingdom
Telephone: +44 121 331 5940
website: makingtreasure.wordpress.com
mail: makingtreasure@googlemail.com

02/08/2010

Le CORPS en morceaux ………. from ‘ANATOMY LESSONS’ exhibition

from ‘ANATOMY LESSONS’ exhibition, at « Taboo Studio« , San Diego (USA) 7 mai-18 juin 2010

Des bijoux qui représentent le corps humain, mais fractionné, bout à bout, comme des petits cailloux pour la mémoire semés par un Petit Poucet qui voudrait retrouver le (bon/droit) chemin ….

et, dès le départ, la série de Jessica Calderwood nous fait de l’oeil …..

Jessica Calderwood, Portrait of an Eye Brooch/Pendant, Enamel on copper, sterling, stainless steel
Jessica Calderwood -Portrait of an Eye’ Brooch/Pendant – Enamel on copper, sterling, stainless steel

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Jessica Calderwood, Blink (enamel, copper and sterling silver)

See image caption.
Jessica CalderwoodAsymmetry’ Brooch- Enamel on copper, sterling, 18k foil. 

Jessica Calderwood, Portrait of a Nose Brooch, Enamel on copper, sterling, stainless steelJessica Calderwood, Portrait of an Ear Brooch/Pendant, Enamel on copper, sterling, stainless steel
Jessica Calderwood  -Portrait of a Nose’ Brooch Enamel on copper, sterling, stainless steel
Jessica Calderwood  -Portrait of an Ear’ Brooch/Pendant - Enamel on copper, sterling, stainless steel

Jessica Calderwood, Navel Brooch/Pendant, Enamel on copper, nu-gold, sterling, stainless steel
Jessica Calderwood - Navel Brooch/Pendant - Enamel on copper, nu-gold, sterling, stainless steel

Jessica Calderwood, Before and After Brooch (reversable), Enamel on copper, sterling, stainless steel, 18k foilJessica Calderwood, Before and After Brooch (reversable), Enamel on copper, sterling, stainless steel, 18k foil
Jessica Calderwood (US) – ‘Before and After’ Brooch (reversable) – Enamel on copper, sterling, stainless steel, 18k foil

« My most recent series consists of psychological portraits that address ideas of consumption and personal obsession using irony, humor and vibrant color. Using a combination of traditional metalsmithing processes, such as raising and die-forming as well as industrial processes such as laser-jet cutting, this work aims to merge contemporary enameled imagery with traditional forms.« ( Jessica Calderwood)

Le CORPS en morceaux .......... from 'ANATOMY LESSONS' exhibition dans Anne DONZE (FR) 548_2B1T3065
Diane Falkenhagen   « After Canova’s Paulina » Brooch/Pendant – 2010

cette broche de Diane Falkenhagen illustre parfaitement ce sentiment de « corps morcelé« , mis en pièce(s) ……

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Julia D. Harrison - Rosebud Brooches -wood, lacquer, gouache, epoxy + more

Julia D. Harrison, Holler Brooches,
Julia D. Harrison (US) ‘Holler’ Brooches – wood

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Sarah J.G. Wauzynski, ‘Small Demands’ – brooch – sterling silver, egg tempera pigment, gold

See image caption.
Randy Long (US) – Brooch – Sterling, hand carved marble

See image caption.
Randy J. Long-  St.Sebastian Brooch – handcarved shell cameo, 22k gold

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Margaux Lange, The Kiss (sterling silver, plastic and epoxy resin)

See image caption.
Kathleen Browne (US) – ’5 Moments’ brooch -fine & sterling  silver, enamel

« The images used in this series of jewelry pieces are appropriated from a pulp magazine printed during the 1950’s titled Secrets. The magazine photos were overly dramatic and stagy, both tragic and unintentionally comic, but somehow they captured the zeitgeist regarding female transgression. These reconfigured images freeze a moment in the daily drama of our lives and, set as jewels, they serve as paeans to the mundane.
By first manipulating, then converting these images to enamel decals (and firing them onto the surface) I can exploit the historical conventions of enameled portrait miniatures, and, in particular, 18th century decal transfers. Hand-painted enamel portrait miniatures were luxury items but with the development of the decal transfer process, in the mid-18th century, such jewels were affordable to a wider audience. Then as now the enameled image serves to provide a democratized view of time and place. » (Kathleen Browne)

anne donzé - qui a perdu son teton
Anne Donzé (FR) – ‘qui a perdu son teton’ – broche, fonte en argent

Pauline WIERTZ
Pauline WIERTZ (NL) – Bijoux ceramique – Boucles-citrines

33YCx dans Claire LAVENDHOMME (BE)
Yuyen CHANG (Taiwan) – Mao-Fa Series (Untitled Pendant) (2007) copper, enamel, copper wire, sterling silver

Yuyen Chang est cette artiste qui a fait une série de broches sur les « orifices » ………. c’est le moment où jamais de les présenter …. les broches, pas les orifices ……

photo of Orifice Broochphoto of Orifice Broochphoto of Orifice Brooch
Yuyen CHANG (Taiwan) -Orifice Series – Untitled Brooches – copper  – 2000-2002

Claire-Lavendhomme-5-440x271 dans COUP DE COEURClaire-Lavendhomme-1-440x271 dans Diane FALKENHAGEN (US)
Claire Lavendhomme - « Le plus profond c’est la peau » 2007. Bagues – argent, photo, résine, sable.

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Melanie Bilenker, ‘Feet’ 2007 – brooch – gold, sterling silver, ebony, resin, pigment and hair

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Esther Knobel -brooch- sterling silver with perforated (drilled) drawing sewn with iron wire

[kristenbeeler,+brooch.jpg]Beauty and Other Monsters at Velvet da Vinci Gallery,
Kristin Beeler (US)- brooches – drawing is ink on mother of pearl

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Ramon Puig Cuyas (ES) – broche

30300_115589165142911_100000754855215_87157_2798696_n dans Esther KNOBEL (PL)
Sally von Bargen – ‘Short Stories’ serie – ‘wish’

7c dans Gijs BAKKER (NL)6c dans Isabell SCHAUPP (DE)

Isabell Schaupp (DE) ‘hands’ series

 

et… ma dernière « trouvaille » … mais ne dit-on pas qu’on garde le meilleur pour la fin ? ;-)

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Gijs Bakker (NL) – collier ‘Johnny Awakes’ – silver, photography – 1998