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05/08/2017

EXPO ‘Marzee Graduate Show 2017′ – Marzee Gallery, Nijmegen (NL) – 20 Aout-25 Oct. 2017

Marzee International Graduate Show 2017

Please join us, and the participating graduates, for the opening of the Marzee International Graduation Show on Sunday 20 August 2017 at 4pm at Galerie Marzee.

Marzee Graduation Show - opening 20 August 2017 at 4 pm

The annual Marzee International Graduation Show, is the highlight of our exhibition calendar, and has grown from a modest affair to an event unparallelled in size and scope. This year’s show will present a selection of jewellery and objects by more than 100 graduates from 40 different art schools and academies from Europe, US, Asia and Australia.
Galerie Marzee is unique in its support for emerging young talent and since 1986 the Marzee International Graduate Show has offered the best new graduates their first opportunity to exhibit in a world-renowned gallery. During the opening we will also award the Marzee Graduate Prize to this year’s most promising students.
Bringing together student works from all over the globe, Galerie Marzee’s graduate exhibition is the only of its kind. It serves as an annual survey of thesis research in the field of jewellery, but more importantly, as a venue for these investigations, questions, and queries to come to light. Indeed, with contributions from over 40 academies and colleges across the world, design and process are as varied as there are selected works. As these students transition from the structure provided by university jewellery departments into a studio practice of their own making, the opportunity for their first body of work to continue into the contemporary conversation is significant. Perfectly housed within the gallery, the Marzee International Graduate Show 2017 marks the 31st installment, and the only jewellery degree exhibition of this size and scope.
The exhibition will be on show through October 25th.

 ***    


  Lotta Koov, Earthly Pleasures, 2017, brooches; silicone, silver, steel. Graduated from EKA Eesti Kunstiakadeemia, Tallinn, EstoniaLotta Koov, Earthly Pleasures, 2017, brooches; silicone, silver, steel. Graduated from EKA Eesti Kunstiakadeemia, Tallinn, Estonia
 Graduate Show preview: Ammeli Engström, Not my hands, 2017, brooch; silver. Graduated from HDK Academy of Design and Crafts, Gothenburg, Sweden
  Ammeli Engström, Not my hands, 2017, brooch; silver. Graduated from HDK – School of Design and Crafts, Gothenburg, Sweden

    Melissa Selvius, Ankh II, 2017, necklace; aluminium, gold. Graduated from SDSU San Diego State University, United StatesMelissa Selvius, Ankh II, 2017, necklace; aluminium, gold. Graduated from SDSU San Diego State University, United States

 Marzee International Graduate Show 2017 -  Lu Kuai, Peep-Communication, 2017, necklace; lacquer, horse hair, wood, silver, copper. Graduated from BIFT Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology, Beijing, ChinaLu Kuai , Peep-Communication, 2017, necklace; lacquer, horse hair, wood, silver, copper. Graduated from BIFT Beijing Institute of Fashion Technology, Beijing, China

MARZEE Graduate Show (2017) preview: Tamae Kamishima, Gather, 2017, brooches; acrylic paint. Graduated from Hiko Mizuno, Tokyo, Japan Tamae Kamishima, Gather, 2017, brooches; acrylic paint. Graduated from Hiko Mizuno, Tokyo, Japan
Lilian Mattuschka, untitled, 2016, necklace; wood, rubber, iron. Graduated from Alchimia, Florence, ItalyLilian Mattuschka, untitled, 2016, necklace; wood, rubber, iron. Graduated from Alchimia, Florence, Italy

 Holly O'Hanlon, Excess 2, 2016/2017, brooch; slate, treated mild steel, precious white metal, precious yellow metal, two-part epoxy, steel pin. Graduated from Central Saint Martins, London, UK. #graduateshow2017 #galeriemarzee Holly O’Hanlon, Excess 2, 2016/2017, brooch; slate, treated mild steel, precious white metal, precious yellow metal, two-part epoxy, steel pin. Graduated from Central Saint Martins, London, UK

Graduate Show preview: Dabin Lee, Down the Rabbit Hole, 2017, brooch; silver, copper wire, fabric. Graduated from Royal Academy of Antwerp, Belgium Dabin Lee, Down the Rabbit Hole, 2017, brooch; silver, copper wire, fabric. Graduated from Royal Academy of Antwerp, Belgium

Natalie Nicholson, Yellow, 2016, necklace; linen, sterling silver, rubber, wood. Graduated from SUNY, New Paltz, USNatalie Nicholson, Yellow, 2016, necklace; linen, sterling silver, rubber, wood. Graduated from SUNY, New Paltz, US

Marzee graduate show 2017 - Pia Groh, N'1, 2017, earrings agate, oxidised silver. Graduated from Idar-Oberstein, Hochschule Trier, GermanyPia Groh, N’1, 2017, earrings agate, oxidised silver. Graduated from Idar-Oberstein, Hochschule Trier, Germany

Marzee Graduation Show - opening 20 August 2017 at 4 pm

Lage Markt 3 / Waalkade 4
6511 VK Nijmegen, Netherlands
tel +31 24 322 9670

 

 

31/12/2016

EXPO – ’0 + 0 = 0′ – Christchurch Art Gallery (NEW ZEALAND) – 16 Dec. 2016 – 2 Avr. 2017

Classé dans : Exposition/Exhibition,GALERIES,Lisa WALKER (DE/NZ),Nlle Zelande (NZ),www Klimt02 — bijoucontemporain @ 14:08

0 + 0 = 0 by Lisa Walker

Christchurch Art Gallery Te Puna o Waiwhetu presents an exclusive exhibition of new and recent works by this internationally acclaimed artist, who received the prestigious Françoise van den Bosch Award in 2010 and became an Arts Foundation Laureate in 2015

Lisa Walker Artist Talk.  Wednesday, 15 February 2017 / 6pm
Artist Lisa Walker’s extreme, iconoclastic jewellery has been described as ‘the physical manifestation of the mental and virtual baggage of living NOW’.

0 + 0=0 by Lisa Walker Exhibition  /  16 Dec 2016  -  02 Apr 2017 - Christchurch Art Gallery -  Place     Cnr Worcester Blvd and Montreal St     Christchurch     NEW ZEALAND: (Lisa Walker Necklace: Untitled, 2016 Fabric, stuffing Courtesy of the artist and Funaki Gallery, Melbourne)

It might be tempting to say that Lisa Walker makes jewellery out of any old thing – but it isn’t true. The eclectic objects that form her distinctive necklaces, brooches and other body-adornments are meticulously selected and shrewdly modified before they see the light of day. She salvages her materials from an unlikely cornucopia of sources – re-presenting objects such as car parts, animal skins and even kitchen utensils through the frame of body adornment’s long history. Tiny Lego hats, helmets and hairpieces – of the kind that clog vacuum cleaner nozzles in children’s bedrooms around the world – are strung on finely plaited cords like exotic beads or shells; trashy gossip magazines are lashed together to yield a breastplate befitting our celebrity-obsessed culture; dozens of oboe reeds donated by a musician friend bristle round the wearer’s neck like the teeth of some unimaginable deep sea leviathan.
Walker’s work doesn’t sit comfortably within the contours of conventional jewellery – it squirms, fidgets, stretches and unravels. ‘I want to make pieces that don’t fit any of those jewellery recipes, yet still make sense as jewellery,’ she once said.1 In a field known for refined finishes and seamless construction, her audaciously sized, deliberately low-tech pieces inject a blast of pure creative oxygen, wilfully disobeying established jewellery conventions and confounding audience expectations. Despite their bodged-up, glued-together appearance and gleefully tacky origins, Walker’s works are anything but haphazard – rather they are elevated by her acute sense of colour and composition and healthy sense of irony. The new and recent pieces included in her Christchurch Art Gallery show, 0 + 0 = 0, explore a range of critical concerns; confronting jewellery-specific preconceptions about wearability and craftsmanship, they also investigate the politics of value, identity and appropriation.
…..
While some of Walker’s materials are amassed close to home – she once made a necklace from six months’ worth of detritus collected from her studio floor – she also ranges more widely, combing the world of the non-precious for idiosyncratic treasures. Together with physical objects, she collects memories and associations, a process made explicit in Trip to Europe 1973 (2011), a necklace, constructed from the postcards, train tickets, concert programmes and other souvenirs a ‘cultured couple’ offered for sale on Trade Me. For Walker, having just returned home after fifteen years spent living in Germany, the mementos spoke of New Zealand’s complex history of arrivals – including those of Māori and European settlers – and of how cultures are transported, translated and transformed. Recent pieces such as Pendant (2016) reflect her interest in (and ambivalence about) exchange and appropriation and especially how these might play out within a New Zealand context. Assembled from pounamu offcuts given to Walker by a sculptor friend, Pendantcombines varied surfaces cut from several different stones, offering a beautiful, but deliberately problematic, addition to the tradition of Māori taonga.

Lisa Walker Dick Necklace 2016  Lisa Walker Dick Necklace 2016

Despite the irreverence of its title, and the ubiquitous banality of the phallic graffiti that inspired it, another, equally serious, reclamation prompted the creation of Dick Necklace (2016).
I live with the challenges of a patriarchal world and [its] hideous anti-women history. I’m intrigued by the online activity of the younger feminists. I was always impressed by Louise Bourgeois’s giant bronze cast penis sculpture [Filette (1968)]. Many years ago I saw a postcard of her as a 70-something year old woman, standing next to it with her hand gently, but authoritatively, resting on the giant penis. ‘Dick and balls’ drawings are a cultural phenomenon; we grow up with these scrawlings everywhere. The penis can be symbolically positive and negative; fertility and love, but also rape, misogyny, imbalance of power. As a feminist I now take, claim, and interpret it for myself, twisting its symbology into something else.
‘I learned a long time ago that you don’t have to find the answers. It’s enough for the works to keep asking the questions.’
The thorny issue of copying and influence has long fascinated Walker, gaining new relevance as social media allows for the increasingly unrestricted distribution and repurposing of imagery of all kinds. She joined Instagram, the online image-sharing service, in 2015 and describes it as a ‘huge hunting ground’,2 admitting she is now influenced more by what she finds online than by actual, ‘real world’ objects. A posted shot of Masturbine (1984), a well-known work by the renowned contemporary Swiss duo Peter Fischli and David Weiss, prompted her own Fischli & Weiss Bracelet(2016), which replaces the original’s whorl of expensive leather footwear with budget heels from her local Number One Shoes warehouse. A photograph of a cellphone bound up in the twisted cord of an old-school desk phone, uploaded by the Los Angeles-based artists Mitra Saboury and Derek Paul Boyle under the Instagram nomenclature ‘Meatwreck’, proved irresistible. Walker recreated it, almost exactly, in the form of an oversized pendant and, though she remains delighted with the piece, doesn’t shy away from the questions about ownership and creative license this kind of borrowing provokes. In fact, the discomfort inherent in such appropriation is shared by artist and collectors, since Walker’s works are primarily designed not to be displayed politely indoors, but to travel with their wearers out into the wild, wide open of the public domain. ‘I learned a long time ago that you don’t have to find the answers,’ she says, ‘It’s enough for the works to keep asking the questions.
  If the eclectic forms of Walker’s work reflect the democracy and limitless possibility of our new open-source world, her ‘more is more’ aesthetic also suggests the sense of chaos and overload it can provoke. With every online image potentially linked to thousands more, how could you ever see it all? Excessive, oversized, popping at the seams with look-at-me impudence, Walker’s works draw upon and reflect the unrelenting abundance of modern life. And yet, taken one piece at a time, they’re much more than thrown-together clickbait. At its most anarchic, jewellery that is created to be worn still requires its maker to take into account a series of considerations that don’t constrain other art forms, like painting or sculpture. As she creates her pieces, often concealing traditional jewellery processes beneath contemporary kitsch, Walker thinks about weight, scale, durability, and how her pieces will relate to the yet-unknown body they are destined to adorn. Having thrown out the rulebooks in her early practice, she now values the technical challenges these self-imposed limits present, enjoying how they slow things down and distil her attention, demanding mindful focus in a fast-moving world. In discussion, it soon becomes apparent that this process fuels, rather than suppresses, Walker’s high-voltage imagination. Recalling a project in which she turned an entire building (City Gallery Wellington) into a brooch by clipping a giant mild-steel safety chain to its ceiling and attaching the other end to a wearer via an enormous pin, she mischievously refers to it as only her ‘second largest work’. She’s not kidding; the scale of that audacious project is effortlessly eclipsed by another one. Existing, so far, in solely conceptual form it features a chain, pinned to its wearer, with planet Earth on the other end.  Felicity Milburn, Curator

Lisa Walker Pendant: Untitled, 2016 Pounamu, silver, thread Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Biro, Munich: Lisa Walker Pendant: Untitled, 2016 Pounamu, silver, thread Courtesy of the artist and Galerie Biro, Munich
Lisa Walker Necklace: Untitled, 2015 Plastic, thread Courtesy of the artist and Masterworks Gallery, Auckland: Lisa Walker Necklace: Untitled, 2015 Plastic, thread Courtesy of the artist and Masterworks Gallery, Auckland
Lisa Walker  Pendant: Untitled, 2016  Egg beater, thread.  Courtesy of the artist and The National, Christchurch: Lisa Walker  Pendant: Untitled, 2016  Egg beater, thread.  Courtesy of the artist and The National, Christchurch
Lisa Walker  Necklace: Trip to Europe 1973, 2011  Documents, brass, string  Courtesy of the artist: Lisa Walker  Necklace: Trip to Europe 1973, 2011  Documents, brass, string  Courtesy of the artist
Lisa Walker Fischli & Weiss Bracelet 2016. Shoes. Courtesy of the artist  Lisa Walker Fischli & Weiss Bracelet 2016. Shoes. Courtesy of the artist
Christchurch Art Gallery
Cnr Worcester Blvd and Montreal St
Christchurch
NEW ZEALAND
Mail:  info@christchurchartgallery.org.nz

 

05/12/2016

EXCHANGE-BIJOU 1 – Marion Lebouteiller – Got the blues …..

I «got the blues» with Marion Lebouteiller, again and again … sigh ….

Elle expose actuellement à DAZZLE Exhibitions où l’on peut voir quelques-unes de ses dernières pièces en feutre … BLEU of course !

Dazzle@Oxo : We have now opened to the public at Gallery@Oxo. Come down to Oxo Tower Wharf (LONDON) to see us and visit other interesting independent retailers.

Dates 13 November 2016 to 8 January 2017.

Sepiola neckpiece - Sterling silver, handmade felt.Marion Lebouteiller – Sepiola neckpiece – Sterling silver, handmade felt.

 Sepiola neckpiece - Sterling silver, handmade felt - 2016Marion Lebouteiller  Sepiola neckpiece – Sterling silver, handmade felt – 2016 -
in LOVE with this neckpiece !!!!

 Marion Lebouteiller –  22Towards the light – brooch – Sterling silver, copper crystals, handmade felt, gold leaf, steel wire.: Marion Lebouteiller –  22Towards the light – brooch – Sterling silver, copper crystals, handmade felt, gold leaf, steel wire

« Marion explores the relationship between natural and human worlds by combining silver, gold or bronze with natural elements such as mother-of-pearl or felt. …..
I am inspired by my surroundings but also by the Japanese culture and the «Wabi-Sabi» philosophy: the beauty of things imperfect, impermanent and incomplete. I like leaving space to the unexpected and let the materials express themselves.
My techniques include the lost-wax casting and the casting from natural items into silver, gold or bronze but also soldering, hand piercing, traditional chasing techniques
I combine precious and non-precious metals with mother-of-pearl and textiles as I am very interested in the propensity of felt to highlight the coldness and the stiffness of metal.
 All my pieces are handmade, either one-offs or small series, using recycled or Fairmined metals wherever possible, as I am very much into the idea (and the actions) of living on this planet with a minimum impact on the environment and on the life of mining labourers. »

Marion Lebouteiller  -  ~ here is a detail of my Sepiola neckpiece  2016Marion Lebouteiller  -  ~ here is a detail of my Sepiola neckpiece  2016

Marion Lebouteiller ... And the back of the brooch !  recycled silver, felt Marion Lebouteiller … And the back of the brooch !  recycled silver, felt

Marion Lebouteiller - Multi-drops earrings Sterling silver.  ​Patinated, 24k gold leaf, lacquered. Marion Lebouteiller - Multi-drops earrings Sterling silver.  ​Patinated, 24k gold leaf, lacquered

Marion Lebouteiller - "Sepiola necklace I" - Sterling silver, felt.: Marion Lebouteiller - « Sepiola necklace I » – Sterling silver, felt

Marion Lebouteiller -  2016 - Sepiola brooch with blue felt - Sterling silver, handmade felt, steel wire: Marion Lebouteiller -  2016 – Sepiola brooch with blue felt – Sterling silver, handmade felt, steel wire

Marion Lebouteiller  Seeds studs - sterling silver, blue felt: Marion Lebouteiller  Seeds studs – sterling silver, blue felt

 

 

Dazzle@Oxo

riverside Gallery at Oxo Tower Wharf
Oxo Tower Wharf
Bargehouse Street
South Bank
London SE1 9PH
Opening times Monday  to.Saturday10-7,Sundays 11-6,We are closed 25,26,27 December and 1 January. Closing early at 4pm on Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve.
After Christmas 11-6 daily, There will be two Private View openings on Friday 11 and Saturday 12 November.

helpdesk@coinstreet.org
24-hour information line  020 7021 1686

Telephone during the exhibition 07472 105423.

 

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01/10/2016

Bijoux en situation …. Eva Burton – high level desiderata !

Eva Burton, plus que « bijoux en situation » je devrais dire « DESIDERATA en situation » !!!

graduate from  Escola Massana  in 2014
now at Idar-OberSTEIN  (MFA stud.)(Master in Fine Arts))

  »During this time I’ve been in Idar-Oberstein doing my MFA I have been researching different aspects of the concept of « play » in society and how it influences in building the personality of human beings.
I have sailed the deep seas of Freudian concepts, repeating inward the sound « Fort- daaa », understanding this as a magic spell capable of transforming that reality that distresses us into something pleasant. Play has the power to transform confusion and trauma into a situation of enjoyment and connection with ourselves. Play is a ritual that takes place in a sacred place, the magic circle, the backyard of our house, the playground. That magical corner is deeply connected to our unconscious and through its exploration we can get to know more ourselves and we can also find this source of inspiration for our daily lives. Play is an intermezzo in our routine, is an ornament that adds beauty and grace to our lives. Playing is a need, a function of living beings. . Into an imperfect world and into the confusion of life it brings us a temporary, limited perfection. »  (oct. 2016)

 Eva  Burton   2015 ·- Bacon Twist. Necklace, 2014 Pink opal, enameled copper, wild boar teeth, silver: Eva  Burton   2015 ·- Bacon Twist. Necklace, 2014 Pink opal, enameled copper, wild boar teeth, silver

Eva  Burton   nov 2015 -  Drifting chair Brooch. 2013. Reclaimed woods from skate and furniture, enameled copper, paint, silver, paper.: Eva  Burton   nov 2015 -  Drifting chair Brooch. 2013. Reclaimed woods from skate and furniture, enameled copper, paint, silver, paperEva Burton  nov 2015 ·   Morning after party Necklace. 2013 Reclaimed woods from skate and furniture, agate, paint, silver, cotton thread.: Eva Burton  nov 2015 ·   Morning after party Necklace. 2013 Reclaimed woods from skate and furniture, agate, paint, silver, cotton thread

 

 

« Me gusta metaforizar mis experiencias, me gusta romantizar lo cotidiano, me gusta enaltecer los pequeños detalles.
 La palabra “petium” proviene del latín pecium o petium, que significa “trozo de algo roto o fragmento encontrado después de un naufragio”.
 Esta definición le abre paso a un paralelismo entre dos imágenes/escenarios:
 Una es en la orilla del mar frente a los restos de un naufragio expulsados por las aguas. La marea actuando como un motor de transformación, de limpieza, extrayendo de lo profundo aquello que estuvo perdido, olvidado.
 Y por otro lado mi realidad: la vorágine citadina, el consumo desmedido de los humanos que todo lo desechamos se convierte en un torbellino que va escupiendo los residuos de la sociedad. ¿Mi misión? Colectar esa escoria a manera de tesoros, como si fueran caracolas en la orilla; transformarlos, darles una segunda oportunidad, una nueva vida, reutilizar lo que la gente desecha para aportarle algo mío.
 El ambiente circundante me influye, los focos donde pongo  mi atención son diferentes en cada escenario, pero hay un denominador común: los detalles. ¿Por qué poner atención en ellos? Es la observación minuciosa la que nos permite detectarlos. Es esa sensibilidad la que nos permite capturar su esencia y entonces quizá… son los pequeños detalles los que le dan a la vida sostén, sabor, ¿ilusión…?
La mixtura es lo que me completa, quiero encontrar en los opuestos las conexiones y hacerlos dialogar, bailar, distanciar, acercar, jugar…
Mis piezas son como una pócima que combina muchos elementos provenientes de diversos puertos y rincones. Son collages, ensambles. Pero la morfología, la composición, los elementos no son independientes, hay una interacción, están interconectados entre sí a través de su forma, colores, manchas, texturas, líneas, distancias…Se crea un conglomerado donde esta multiplicidad tiene una relación y es la asociación de los elementos que definen un conjunto, a través de los cuales intento reflejar mi  propio mundo.
Castillos de chupetines, pedestales a la hora de la merienda. Columnas verdes, columnas blancas. Ruinas imaginarias. Curvas moderadas. Aristas afiladas. Soles amarillos y soles rosas.
 En mis piezas todo aquello que parece disparatado es posible… Mi manera de componer está asentada en bases lúdicas, instintivas. Voy oliendo los colores y los elementos de un paisaje hogareño… Busco, en definitiva, sentirme como en casa… »

 

Eva  Burton - clorophyll amulet from series "The backyard of my house is special" necklace enamel agate   2015Eva  Burton - clorophyll amulet from series « The backyard of my house is special » necklace enamel agate   2015
 

« I take great pleasure in transforming my experiences into metaphors, adding a romantic view to those slight details that take place in our daily life.
The word “petium” comes from Latin meaning “a piece of something broken or a fragment found after a shipwreck « .
This definition gives way to a parallelism between two images / scenes:
By one side, on the shore of the sea the rests of a shipwreck are revealed by the water. The tide acting as a transformation engine, cleaning, drawing from the deep what had been lost, forgotten.
On the other hand my reality: the vortex of the city, the excessive consumerism of humankind, a tornado of discard that spits out the remains of society.  Which is my mission? To collect these drags as treasures, like shells on the shore. And then transform them, give them a second chance, a new life, reuse what someone considered worthless and leave in it a trace of myself.
The atmosphere of the surrounding affects me, the focus of my attention differs in every setting, but there is a common denominator: The details. Why to put attention to them?  It is the meticulous observation that lets us detect them. It is these sensibilities that allows us to capture their essence and then maybe…are the little details that give us support, taste ….hope …?
The mixture is what fills me.  I want to find the connections in the opposites and make them engage in a dialogue. Make them dance, grow apart, get close, play. My pieces are like a concoction that combines various elements, coming from diverse harbors and corners. They are collages, assemblages. But in the composition the elements are not independent. There is an interaction, they are interconnected through their shape, colour, stains, textures, lines, distances…A conglomeration is created where this multiplicity has a relation and it is the conjunction of the elements that defines a whole, through which I intend to reflect my own world.
Lollypops castles, lemon balustrades. Green columns , white columns. An imaginary ruin. Moderate curves. Sharp edges. Yellow suns and pink suns.
In my pieces everything that seems nonsense it is possible. My way of composing is seated in playful, instinctual bases. I go around smelling the colours and the elements of a homely landscape … Seeking for the “welcome home” feeling… »  (Eva Burton blog)

Eva  Burton earringsEva  Burton earrings

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21/02/2016

During SCHMUCK 2016 : EXPO ‘A TRIBUTE TO MANFRED BISCHOFF’ – 3stations, Munich (DE) – 24-28 Fevr. 2016

3stations
A TRIBUTE TO MANFRED BISCHOFF   – 43 Students Pay Homage
43 of his former students from 22 countries who will each show a piece at the exhibition, dedicated to Manfred’s golden “Fingerpuppets” by creating their own little version of Manfred, the real golden boy.

#20
Opening 24.02.2016 18:00

« About the exhibition :  A former student, Isabel Dammermann, took it upon herself to make a special event for the teacher Manfred Bischoff who inspired so many. At the same time, she has managed to create a very interesting exhibition that is on display during the Munich Jewellery week 2016. »

tribute to manfred Bischoff

43 Students Pay Homage :  Dina Abargil — Noriko Akao — Silvie AltschulerRinaldo AlvarezKatharina AsamEunjae BaekSuzanne Beautyman — Silje Bergsvik — Catalina BrenesDaniela BoieriShannon CarneyMarianne Casmose DenningMonica Cecchi – Yu- Chun Chen — Sungho Cho — Claudia Costa — Isabel DammermannElisa DevalCoco DunmireKatie GruberJoanne HuangSayaka ItoAnastasia KandarakiKarin KatoRallou KatsariMichelle KraemerAra KuoSiri O. KvalfossMaru LopezMartina MühlfellnerMalaika Najem — Naoka Nakamura — Angela O’KeefeSelen ÖzusNaama Reich Jimena RiosMarzia RossiAlessia SemeraroYoko ShimizuYuki Sumiya Rudee TancharoenFlora VagiAnne Wiedau

Jewellery artists from 22 countries all over the world come together in a memorial exhibition for Manfred Bischoff who passed away a year ago. At some point or other, they have all been taught by Manfred at Alchimia, contemporary jewellery school in Florence, and have each submitted one piece to the exhibition that honours a great teacher.
German born Manfred Bischoff lived in Tuscany in a house that was in itself a piece of exquisite art. Its magical interior made a natural and perfect framework for his work that has been called by many names: sensual, poetic, lyrical, great, intimate, strong, beautiful, satirical and always surprising. He worked in 22K gold, as pure as he could manage and still maintain a rigidity in the metal that allowed him to execute his ideas in delicate and well crafted pieces, often accompanied with subtle pink coral and drawings.
His dedication to the language of jewellery and his visions were most likely one of the reasons that the Alchimia school managed to become known and respected internationally in a relatively short time span.

  Manfred BischoffManfred Bischoff by Manfred Bischoff

Daniela Boieri, "Wind beneath my wings" - "A tribute to Manfred Bischoff" –  photo OHMYBLUE: Daniela Boieri, « Wind beneath my wings » – « A tribute to Manfred Bischoff » –  photo OHMYBLUE

 Catalina Brenes Orfebre, "My sheep and I say hi" - "A tribute to Manfred Bischoff" – photo OHMYBLUE: Catalina Brenes , « My sheep and I say hi » – « A tribute to Manfred Bischoff » – photo OHMYBLUE

Katie Gruber - "A tribute to Manfred Bischoff" –  - photo OHMYBLUE: Katie Gruber - « A tribute to Manfred Bischoff » – photo OHMYBLUE

Rudee Tancharoen, "In the memory of Manfred Bischoff"/ A tribute to Manfred Bischoff (photo OHMYBLUE): Rudee Tancharoen, « In the memory of Manfred Bischoff »/ A tribute to Manfred Bischoff (photo OHMYBLUE)

Noriko Akao, "M..." - "A tribute to Manfred Bischoff" –  photo OHMYBLUE: Noriko Akao, « M… » – « A tribute to Manfred Bischoff » –  photo OHMYBLUE

 collier Ara Kuo !!!!!!!!!! 'A tribute to Manfred Bischoff'  (photo Alliages):  collier Ara Kuo !!!!!!!!!! ‘A tribute to Manfred Bischoff’  (photo Alliages)

The teacher
« As a student at Alchimia, you never really met Manfred until the third year. He was a giant figure who arrived to the narrow street in Florence on Tuesdays. He spent time with the older students, watched the world from behind his sunglasses when he leaned onto the wall at coffee breaks, and then he vanished again.
It was not until you were there yourself – in your final year – that you met the myth and began to appreciate his capacity to engage in your work and to show you how you might develop it. He was a surprisingly selfless teacher, and during critiques in the small classroom he managed to create a space for you and him to engage in a dialogue about your work that was stripped of second agendas and based solely on how he could help you to become a better artist.
It is only later, you come to understand how exceptionally truthful and helpful he tried to be in order to make you grow as a person and as an artist. »

 

 

3stations
Welserstrasse 15,
81373 Munich
Thu, Fri, Sat 10:00 – 18:00, Sun 10:00 – 14:00
www.3stations.de

 

25/01/2016

Selection 4 SCHMUCK 2016 : Kadri Mälk

Kadri Mälk,  BLACK BEAUTY

Congrats to all the artists who made the SCHMUCK 2016 list, on show at the Handwerksmesse during #munichjewelleryweek  24/02–1/03/2016

Congrats to all the artists who made the SCHMUCK 2016 list, on show at the Handwerksmesse during #munichjewelleryweek / #jewellery #brooch by Kadri Mälk     brooch by Kadri Mälk

Kadri Mälk  Brooch: Very Guilty 2010  Siberian jet, black rhodium plated white gold, spinel, tourmalines  11.5 x 6.6 x 1.2 cm: Kadri Mälk  Brooches : « Very Guilty » & « Guilty » 2010  Siberian jet, black rhodium plated white gold, spinel, tourmalines  11.5 x 6.6 x 1.2 cm

interview :« Kadri Mälk – Love Me Or Leave Me Or Let Me Be Lonely »
By Aaron Patrick Decker (THANKS to AJF)

I ascended old stairs to a cozy apartment in Tallinn, Estonia, where I had the pleasure of interviewing the renowned Estonian jeweler Kadri Mälk. As the head of the metals department in the Estonian Academy of Arts, she shines a spotlight on younger Estonian jewelers. She has given rise to a generation whose work is strong, individual, and definitely Estonian. Mälk’s work is dark, poetic, and wholly of her own voice. Utilizing such traditional jewelry materials as gold, silver, gemstones, and jet, she creates a recipe whose melancholy fragrances permeate through all her work. 
Aaron Patrick Decker: How did you come to jewelry?
Kadri Mälk: Initially I studied painting for four years and really enjoyed it. Before that, I worked in a publishing house. After studying painting, I suddenly felt that maybe it wasn’t for me, maybe I needed something more intimate. After that I went to the Academy to study jewelry. I was either 28 or 29 when I graduated. I felt somehow that I was late, an autumn flower. I remained a freelance artist and was on my own for about nine years; meanwhile I was invited to teach. Initially it was just a small workload, like once a week. I enjoyed staying in my atelier and working on my own schedule and freedom. I liked it so much, no due dates and a kind of wild life, a lifestyle I still really appreciate.
After graduation I began some studies in stonework. First in St. Petersburg in a stone-cutting factory, a huge factory that received quite high-quality raw materials from Siberia. Then I studied gemology in Finland at the Lahti Design Institute for two years. I was offered to prolong my studies in London in 1993–94 and receive the highest degree one could get in gemological studies. During that time in Estonia, there was no one in the field of gemology. It’s a small field in general, but in Estonia, no one had this sort of certification.
But then my professor, Kuldkepp, fell ill and couldn’t return to the department anymore. Until this point I had worked alone. Leading a department is not just about being an ideological leader, there are other concerns about finances, and finding a team that works. You have to find people who fit together. I had no experience in this work so I was very afraid of the proposal to take the department. And especially since I was offered the gemological certification, which was seductive.
Simultaneously, I got a chance to work in Germany. I was young, bold, and at that time ready to jump. I applied to Bernd Munsteiner’s studio. He rejected me at first, saying he had too much work to also teach an apprentice. Somehow he changed his mind and decided to bring me in. They were intrigued by Estonia, the wild northern forest, so they said okay. He was concerned about my age and the time allotted; to learn stone cutting and faceting requires a large amount of time. I went in there not being able to speak German, and they had a certain dialect. I had some stone-cutting experience from St. Petersburg, but not at the level at which his workshop operated. It was very generous of him to take me.
We began at 7 a.m. and the first break was at 10:30 for some coffee. It was very tight and regimented. Funnily, during lunch they turned off the power in the shop; I thought I could work more during this time, but it was not allowed. He didn’t believe in the beginning that I could learn facet cutting, but at the end he was happy with where I got. I remember having a notebook and just trying to write down everything during lunchtime. I wouldn’t eat. I’d just write what the workers were saying. The old knowledge. It was my passion, stones.
You have said you were close with your professor; can you talk about your decision to take over the department?
Kadri Mälk: She was the reason I decided to take over the department. It was kind of fatal serendipity—as I saw it then, but not anymore. I had to do it because she could not. She was an extraordinary personality in the time and circumstances, she did not fit the environment, didn’t fit the times. If you read her writings, you could tell she had such a drive sourced from somewhere else. She had such a mission to pass on things to people, not in a direct way but in an indirect and metaphoric way. Her teaching methods were not pedagogical at all, she was often much more abstract. She locked the students in the room and said, “Just work.” All should be concentration, creativity driven to the work. No cinema, no theater, no magazines, no outside information, and it should all come from yourself, come through you. Extreme methods, but very effective. She wanted you to achieve the maximum. She was not very communicative, didn’t go anywhere, didn’t move around, her efforts were very concentrated on certain students. I can’t find the right words to completely describe her, but she wanted students to open up by closing off.
Do you think becoming a professor so early shaped you as an artist and continues to shape you?
Kadri Mälk: I was a baby professor. I was elected when I was 37. I had already been a renowned artist for some time, but as an educator, administrator, or team member, I had no experience. Looking back, I realize now the trust from admin and colleagues when I took over the department. My creative past supported me and proved to them I could survive in the school. Just recently somebody outside of the academy, and artists, came to me and said, “Now, Kadri, I realize you have done it well…” In the beginning, others were hesitant because I was seemingly unsuitable for the job. The highest hesitations came from me. I was unsure if I could rise to the occasion. And when the women came, 15 years later, it was some confirmation.
I just liked to make my pieces. And it’s so funny, I still go about my work in a similar way. Nowadays students are much more oriented by a schedule and thinking about making work for exhibition. Deadlines. My satisfaction came from my pieces, from the process. I liked how they came to me, how they happened. When I was in school, learning about the art field was not included. The professor tried to keep this off us, all these associations, how this works, etc. I remember asking her what happens when I graduate. She didn’t tell me anything about the real life of artists. It was all about the work. It was a conscious decision to keep the art world away from us.

Kadri Mälk  necklace "Amnesia" 2010  - ebony, tourmaline, silver, - photo Tanel VeenreKadri Mälk  necklace « Amnesia » 2010  – ebony, tourmaline, silver, – photo Tanel Veenre

Kadri Mälk - "Mid-day of life" 2008 brooch - jet, silver, almandine, smoky quartz - photo Tanel Veenre: Kadri Mälk – « Mid-day of life » 2008 brooch – jet, silver, almandine, smoky quartz – photo Tanel Veenre

Do you think your work changed during this period?
Kadri Mälk: No, not because of the Academy. The majority of my time went into the Academy, but this didn’t affect my work. In the first years, we gave assignments to students in the form of certain themes. Later on, especially at the MA level, where the study is more conceptual, they must meet their choices themselves to reinforce their spiritual identities.
Someone asked me, “What do you like best about teaching?” I feel lucky that I have the possibility to notice and follow how personalities develop and begin to blossom; how new talented personalities emerge in a creative surrounding; and how they act and react. And how passionate they may be in their work! It’s the achievement of every member of our staff.
Not much changed about me, either. Of course I had to modify my talking towards topics, concentrate, and learn to convey or see the methods that worked best, but at the core I didn’t change.
It’s very different to be just a teacher rather than the department leader. You are responsible for all that happens. The biggest difference is that the academy and the students are number one, followed by your work and your family. The academy and the students are number one. They can call me at any time if they need. I feel better in this. They know that they can come, they are not lost.
I think that’s quite admirable. I haven’t heard of another professor so invested in the program in the ways you are. What do you think some of the most important things to pass on to your students are, what do you hope they take away from you and the Academy?
Kadri Mälk: A kind of attitude, that you should believe in yourself. People shouldn’t take you off your path. Younger artists are vulnerable, in a condition to be shaped or reshaped; it’s important to tell them or convince them that whatever happens you should turn that attention in to yourself, otherwise you get lost. If you take into consideration all the opinions you hear, you get lost; there is so much noise. You don’t know where to look or where to go. You don’t orient yourself any longer in the world. Believe in yourself … it’s hard to when you’re young. Believe and be strong in your core.
Then your core begins to fortify?
Kadri Mälk: Yes, it becomes stronger. It crystalizes, the elements that are more important, the ones that are harder, take shape, and the rest falls apart. It comes with time, you shouldn’t force or exaggerate. You have to be patient.
There are so many conferences, so many books asking the big question—is jewelry art? It’s not my task to answer it.
My comment to it is very simple: love me or leave me or let me be lonely. 
Or to put it differently: take it or leave it or let me be lonely.
What do I mean with that? It’s very simple. There is always another way out. It’s not only taking or leaving. There is another possibility which is hardly seen. You just have to be patient and look carefully.
Also, the creative process has confusion, has crisis. You should not be afraid of these things, they are natural. Fear that your next work will fail is so very normal. Crisis is normal in art making. Art is always about starting again in hesitation.
What are your impressions of younger jewelers now coming into the field, at large and in Estonia?
Kadri Mälk: (long pause) It is very hard to generalize, even here the local scene is quite diverse. You can se
more design-oriented work, more personal work. I try to encourage these people who are afraid of having somehow veiled, personal, or exceptional ways of expressing. If they compare themselves to what is happening in different places with people their age, they begin unconsciously to bring other aesthetics into their own work. I want to encourage people who are different, who are slightly insecure.
Francis Bacon said, if you are going to decide to be an artist, you have got to decide that you are not going to be afraid to make a fool of yourself.
Making art is so simple—all you have to do is to wait quietly, staring at a blank wall until the drops of blood appear on your forehead. Be aware that criticism always comes along with creative work. If you can’t handle it, you have to quit.
How frequently and easily success transforms into depression! You can avoid it by leaving some loose threads in your work, some unresolved part that carries you forward in your new work. What you need to know in your next piece is silently present in your last. You can find it while looking in patience. It’s like a seed crystal for your next destination.
I am not really analytical like most. I am interested mostly in my unconscious choices, what I like and what triggers me.
If someone were to ask about your work, how would you describe it to them?
Kadri Mälk: Look at the originals. You should look at the original pieces and see for yourself.
Do you think that is an important idea, to see things in person?
Kadri Mälk: Yes. We are so much in the age of reproduction. We see the screen or the page with the picture. We don’t look at the original anymore, we don’t feel the tactility of the pieces or taste the iron. It is very harmful to humankind to go about it in this manner. Go to the originals. Otherwise it is so meta-meta, you don’t feel, you don’t know the scale, the details, or the material from the copies.
What are some of the things that inspire you?
Kadri Mälk: I don’t know what inspiration is exactly. Sometimes things are more intense and sometimes less intense. Sometimes I feel that I can capture things, forms, colors, something in the air, and sometimes I feel like sand is running through my fingers.
Consciously I cannot, but it comes more from my subconscious. There’s some differentiation between mental and physical subconscious. One is staying here (Mälk points to her head) and one is here (she points to her stomach), the first is mental and then the second is more gut, subconscious. The feelings are very different. Or maybe the frequencies are different. I like life in all its expressions, that’s my source
In talking about those two polar ways—analytical and emotional—in your work, do you bring them together, is there one that’s more important to you?
Kadri Mälk: Usually it’s subconscious, these decisions you make. They are made before they are at your conscious level. You made the decisions in a big fog. Just as in crystallization, they come into being. And when they are there, it is your choice to call them either consciously made or born out of the sky.
Looking at your work, there is a quality of instantaneous moment; going deeper, you find more and more. The work is quite striking and emotionally charged. Seems very palpable, like it has a heartbeat. There is also a melancholy quality to many of your pieces. Is that a conscious decision or a more subconscious one?
Kadri Mälk: A tiger cannot avoid his stripes! (She laughs.)
That’s a great analogy. 
Kadri Mälk: I am very shy describing my work. I am afraid I cannot reach the truth through verbalization.
There is this quality of Estonian jewelers, not a reluctance, but an ability to keep the integrity of the work. It’s hard to describe the work prescriptively in its conceptual and formal functions, often it acts like poetry, it speaks with power but is not completely resolute. What is your opinion of this attitude?
Kadri Mälk: When I think of my jewelry, it’s easier to describe it. “It’s blue, violet, black, and purple. There is fog, there are shades of magenta.” You can be precise without being clear. And unclear may also be precise. It’s very much an oxymoron.

Kadri Mälk, Downcast Face, 2013, brooch, black rhodium-plated white gold, black baroque pearl, black diamonds, black diamond dust, 120 x 72 x 12 mm, artist’s collection, photo: Tiit RammulKadri Mälk, Downcast Face, 2013, brooch, black rhodium-plated white gold, black baroque pearl, black diamonds, black diamond dust, 120 x 72 x 12 mm, artist’s collection, photo: Tiit Rammul

Being precise but unclear, can you talk more about this notion?
Kadri Mälk: It’s really a sort of hologram, like a puzzle. As a notion and phenomenon, I think it’s possible. 
It is an interesting facet of Estonian jewelry. Sort of irresolute.
Kadri Mälk: Yeah, it’s in a stage of becoming. Being on the way.
Yeah, it’s not negative, its more open. 
Kadri Mälk: Yes, an ambivalence. 
Is there something that you want people to get from your work?
Kadri Mälk: To share the unsharable. What often happens is that the viewer approaches in a superficial way, which is natural. On the foreground they see materials, especially if there are unusual materials.
I’ve used a lot of moleskin in my work and it’s taken a kind of attraction or peculiarity in my work. I don’t feel a need to explain the choices I’ve made. How it came to me, it was just an incident. Or a happy accident.
When all my stuff was stolen from my atelier, I found a coat of my grandmother’s from the war, made out of moleskin. I took it apart, slices of extremely thin, like silk, soft silk paper like. Then I saw these pieces. The tenderness at first, the sensuality of the material, and that the fur grew in only one direction. It was so thin, the fur. It had such a strong character, though. I started to work with this, used it a lot, the coat is now gone into all the pieces. I also think the animal is present in the work. The mole, he’s blind, he doesn’t have sight but has extreme animal spirit. All this orientation in time and space. I studied how they moved, their lives, did more research. How they were trapped and caught. This animalism was powerful and important for me in these works. But you aren’t going to retell the story. If you put it into a story, it’s banal. 
Can you talk more about the jet in your work?
Kadri Mälk: When I carve it, like timber or wood, it has nerves like a human body. The stones have structure, they direct you. They tell you where to go. You should go there and you shouldn’t make the wrong decision. There is a negotiation with the stone when I cut it. Jet is mute, silencium. Only a big dust is coming. Your lungs are filled with jet powder. Like stones are directing you in advance, there are inclusions, by heat they will crack more. Jet is completely mute. This is what fascinates me. It’s not much used in jewelry anymore. 
I lack the habit and custom and will to interpret my works after they have been completed. The work either tells you something or it doesn’t. Once you have completed it, then keep quiet. The work must know whether it radiates or not. The piece of jewelry in your mind, in your imagination, is always correct and beautiful. Resistance starts when you try to convert it into material. Oh, la la! Materials are like elementary particles—charged, heavily charged sometimes, but indifferent. They don’t tell you much, you have to tell them the truth.
You have staged events and produced a number of books—JUST MUST, Castle in the Air, etc.—about Estonian jewelry and jewelers. You have made the work coming from the Academy available to a much larger audience. Give us your thoughts about publishing these books and what your intentions were at the time you did them.
Kadri Mälk: Firstly, I love books. I love their smell and the shade of the voice when you turn the page and then unexpectedly see a new image … It’s both emotional and intellectual. Since 1989 I have published twenty-something publications, some of them out-of-print already. The first ones were really ugly ducklings, black-and-white … I’ve strived always to tell something different with them, it has been my passion. Indeed, they have been acting as ambassadors of Estonian jewelry in the world, although it was not intended. So many students coming from abroad have said the pull came from the books. Strange! Usually nowadays the urge comes from the Internet. 
To make an impression abroad is not as important as to make an impression in your own soul.
Thank you.

 Kadri Mälk - "Fresh, dried, only young" 2001 brooch - sarcodon imbricatus (mushroom), silver, almandines: Kadri Mälk – « Fresh, dried, only young » 2001 brooch – sarcodon imbricatus (mushroom), silver, almandines

Kadri Mälk, Medusa IV – ehisnõel (oksüdeeritud hõbe, kumm). coop.artun.ee/nope5/: Kadri Mälk, Medusa IV – ehisnõel (oksüdeeritud hõbe, kumm)

22/01/2016

Decouverte / COUP de COEUR : Mirka Janeckova – WHITE is WHITE

Mirka Janeckova

« I see my jewellery as a container for wearer’s emotions, memories and hopes. For creating my recent work I was inspired by surrealism and indigenous cultures.
My pieces refer to the body in an abstract way, exploring the relationship between people and their subconscious mind.
I am concentrating on using only ‘white’ materials as porcelain, silver, aluminium and textile to create playful, poetic pieces. White light contains all the others colour of the spectrum so for me it is a symbol of the unity.
I am experimenting with hybrid metal-porcelain jewellery and developing an innovative ways of applying traditional metalsmith techniques onto porcelain such as casting porcelain in place and cloisonné enamel on porcelain » (to shop at Neuner schmuck)

2014 – 2016   Royal College of Art, London  MA Jewellery and Metals
2009 – 2013  Glasgow School of Art, School of Design  BA Hons (First Class) Silversmithing and Jewellery
2015 The Most Innovative New Collection – Editor’s Choice Award at IJL
2014 BKV Price Finalist
2014 Creativity Contest, Torino, Italy – 2nd prize winner

 Mirka Janeckova Mirka Janeckova  -White Collection bangle aluminium, white porcelaine, silk, silver – (at NEUNER Schmuck)

Mirka Janeckova  -White Collection bangle aluminium, white porcelaine, silk, silverMirka Janeckova  -White Collection bangle aluminium, white porcelaine, silk, silver

« La White Collection si mostra in apparenza fragile, con le sue linee evanescenti, ma in realtà -come spiega Mirka, i suoi gioielli sono tutt’altro che delicati, perché la porcellana è un materiale molto resistente che sulla scala della durezza corrisponde a 7, maggiore delle pietre dure (come i quarzi), una caratteristica che assume dopo una cottura in forno a 1200-1400 gradi. La tecnica di “cottura bianca” utilizzata dalla designer permette poi di mantenere inalterata la brillantezza dell’argento di contro al bianco opaco della porcellana, presentando così il gioiello come oggetti dal valore anche tattile, oltre che bello ed originale da indossare. » (PreziosaMagazine)

Mirka Janeckova  - Work in progress for AiR16 show at Lighthouse - mai 2014Mirka Janeckova  – Work in progress for AiR16 show at Lighthouse – mai 2014

Mirka Janeckova necklace aluminium and porcelain White Collection €434 -aluminium, porcelain white, silk: Mirka Janeckova necklace aluminium and porcelain White Collection  – aluminium, porcelain white, silk - (at NEUNER Schmuck)

http://www.creativityoggetti.it/ita/artisti/item/217-mirka-janeckova.html: Mirka Janeckova at creativityoggetti

Mirka Janeckova White Collection brooch silver, white porcelaine €199 - NEUNER Schmuck: Mirka Janeckova White Collection brooch silver, white porcelaine – (at NEUNER Schmuck)

 Mirka Janeckova - White Collection    Porcelain Necklace  (porcelain, steel) Mirka Janeckova – White Collection    Porcelain Necklace  (porcelain, steel)

Mirka Janeckova - New Designers 2013Mirka Janeckova – New Designers 2013 – brooch presented at JOYA 2014

Mirka Janeckova  - one of my graduating pieces from GSA called Drawing Neckpiece (2013) made from slipcasted porcelain.: Mirka Janeckova  – one of my graduating pieces from GSA called Drawing Neckpiece (2013) made from slipcasted porcelain

10/09/2015

EXPO ‘enmarcamos Eva Burton’ – Amaranto Joies Galeria, Barcelona (ES) – 14 Sept.-31 Oct. 2015

Classé dans : BARCELONA,Eva BURTON (RA),Exposition/Exhibition,Gal. AmarantoJoies (ES) — bijoucontemporain @ 0:12

AMARANTO Joies :

Enmarcamos a Eva Burton

El Patio de mi casa es particular/ The back yard of my house is special

Eva Burton : Con mucha alegría los invito a visitar «El patio de mi casa es particular», hasta el 31 de Octubre en Amaranto Joies, Barcelona 
With great pleasure I invite you to visit «The back yard of my house is special» till the 31st of October in Amaranto Joies, Barcelona

Amaranto Joies - Barcelona - enmarcamos a Eva Burton
El Patio de mi casa es particular
 El patio de mi casa es muy particular
Las ranas y las jirafas vienen a saludar
 Se corren carreras en autos de madera
y luego comemos dulces con crema pastelera
 El patio de  mi casa es muy particular
disfruto de aquellas visitas que lo hacen brillar….
 Me gusta metaforizar mis experiencias, me gusta romantizar lo cotidiano, me gusta enaltecer los pequeños detalles.
El ambiente circundante me influye, los focos donde pongo  mi atención son diferentes en cada escenario, pero hay un denominador común: los detalles. ¿Por qué poner atención en ellos? Es la observación minuciosa la que nos permite detectarlos. Es esa sensibilidad la que nos permite capturar su esencia y entonces quizá… son los pequeños detalles los que le dan a la vida sostén, sabor, ¿ilusión…?
La mixtura es lo que me completa, quiero encontrar en los opuestos las conexiones y hacerlos dialogar, bailar, distanciar, acercar, jugar… Mis piezas son como una pócima que combina muchos elementos provenientes de diversos puertos y rincones. Son collages, ensambles. Pero la morfología, la composición, los elementos no son independientes, hay una interacción, están interconectados entre sí a través de su forma, colores, manchas, texturas, líneas, distancias… Se crea un conglomerado donde esta multiplicidad tiene una relación y es la asociación de los elementos que definen un conjunto, a través de los cuales intento reflejar mi  propio mundo.
En mis piezas todo aquello que parece disparatado es posible… Mi manera de componer está asentada en bases lúdicas, intuitivas. Voy oliendo los colores y los elementos de un paisaje hogareño… Busco, en definitiva, sentirme como en casa…  Eva Burton   Idar Oberstein, Septiempre 2015

 La-reunion-de-las-ranas-y-el-conejo. - Eva Burton - The back yard of my house is special: Eva Burton – collar La-reunion-de-las-ranas-y-el-conejo 

 Eva Burton (M.F.A. stud. Idar-OberSTEIN) • Necklace "Melodias azules por la ventana" - "Blue melodies through the window" • reclaimed woods from cello, chess and furnitures, sodalite, crisopras, gold, silver, antique paper, acrylic paint • 2015 • photo by artist: Eva Burton (M.F.A. stud. Idar-OberSTEIN) • Necklace « Melodias azules por la ventana » – « Blue melodies through the window » • reclaimed woods from cello, chess and furnitures, sodalite, crisopras, gold, silver, antique paper, acrylic paint • 2015 • photo by artist

Eva Burton - objeto " La reunión de las ranas y el conejo": Eva Burton - objeto/broche  » La reunión de las ranas y el conejo »

Eva Burton - Collar "La jirafa que soñaba con dos soles": Eva Burton - Collar « La jirafa que soñaba con dos soles »

 

The back yard of my house is special
 The back yard of my house is very special
Frogs and giraffes come to say « hi »
 We run races in wooden cars
then we eat some custard pies
The back yard or my house is very special
I enjoy the visits that make it shine
I take great pleasure in transforming my experiences into metaphors, adding a romantic view to those slight details that take place in our daily life.
The atmosphere of the surrounding affects me, the focus of my attention differs in every setting, but there is a common denominator: The details. Why to put attention to them? It is the meticulous observation that lets us detect them. It is this sensibility that allows us to capture their essence and then maybe…is the little details that give us support, taste … hope?
The mixture is what fills me. I want to find the connections in the opposites and make them engage in a dialogue. Make them dance, grow apart, get close, play. My pieces are like a concoction that combines various elements, coming from diverse harbors and corners. They are collages, assemblages. But in the composition the elements are not independent. There is an interaction, they are interconnected through their shape, color, stains, textures, lines, distances…A conglomeration is created where this multiplicity has a relation and it is the conjunction of the elements that defines a whole, through which I intend to reflect my own world. My way of composing is seated in playful, instinctual bases. I go around smelling the colors and the elements of a homely landscape … Seeking for that “welcome home” feeling…   Eva Burton

Amaranto Joies Galeria
Sant Domènec 23
08012 Barcelona
Spain
amarantojoies.blogspot.be

 

15/04/2015

EXPO ‘Soundtrack by Karin Johansson’ – Klimt02 gallery, Barcelona (ES) – 15 Avril-15 Mai 2015

Soundtrack by Karin Johansson

15Apr2015 – 15May2015 Klimt02 Gallery Barcelona, Spain

Opening: April 15th from 19:30 h

The gallery presents on the second solo show of the swedish artist in Barcelona eleven new necklaces following her research on the archeology of city life. Anodized aluminum, rhodinated silver, acrylic and round shapes are the new elements introduced in these works.

Soundtrack by Karin Johansson 15Apr2015 - 15May2015 Klimt02 Gallery Barcelona, Spain(Karin Johansson – Necklace: Alva, 2015 Anodized aluminium, gold, acrylic)

On Karin Johansson words:
 » I use my senses as tools. By using the different senses while in a constant move I perceive the places that surrounds me. The city becomes the source of inspiration to create. In my world wearable signs, that together gives the beat of a city. »

Coincidences and Unexpected Patterns: the City as it is.
It’s there to be used: the cities we live in, the streets we walk on, the buzz of coffee house conversations, the mysterious in-between-places, the empty bus-shelters, the mesmerizing shopwindows, We travel from one place to another, from home to work, sometimes feeling a bit lost, and suddenly we discover the beauty of small things, a piece of string, a plastic bag, some broken glass. Leftover details, the archeology of city life. Maybe a piece of paper is laying there on the floor of the tram, with something written on it, but most of the message is eaten up by the weather and the flow of time. Still we find it meaningful, a secret communication system talking directly to us. There is so much going on in the city, but you have to train your ears and eyes to discover it: the hidden rhythms, the languages underneath the surface, the correspondances between past and present.

 This is what takes place in the jewellery of Karin Johansson. The objects are inspired by materials found on the street; strings, plastic things, foil, trash. An alchemical process in putting the pieces together, using assymetrical combinations to create a sense of movement. The one who wears them give them new meanings, new life, and this dialogue with the unknown is essential. It’s the sound of the city in jewellery form, a soundtrack to the life of rhizomes, dream patterns, walking around without purpose, meeting and parting. There’s a particular joy to her objects, in the bright colours – yellow, dark orange, lilac, cerise, turquoise – in the way they play with form, giving space for non-linear energies. The objects are related to abstract patterns. Unfinished music, to be continued, reordered.    
Magnus Haglund, Writer and critic, based in Gothenburg Sweden

 Karin Johansson Necklace from Soundtrack series - Klara, 2015 Aluminium, gold, acrylic, silverKarin Johansson Necklace from Soundtrack series – Klara, 2015 Aluminium, gold, acrylic, silver

Soundtrack by Karin Johansson.    Necklace: Hamlet, 2015 Gold, acrylic 85 cm Photo by: elStudioKarin Johansson.    Necklace: Hamlet, 2015 Gold, acrylic 85 cm Photo by: elStudio

 

Klimt02 Gallery
Riera de Sant Miquel, 65
08006 -  Barcelona
SPAIN
tel 00 34 933687235
klimt@klimt02.net

 

05/04/2015

EASTER …. PÂQUES …. in white with (« imperfect ») crosses

Classé dans : COUP DE COEUR,Cristine CEZ - MechantStudio (FR),DECOUVERTE,France (FR) — bijoucontemporain @ 0:22

En ce jour de Pâques très fêté, et que je ne fête pas plus que ça, comme une « horrible » mécréante que je suis … j’ai fait une jolie découverte, « de Pâques » ?, en tout cas, blanche, lumineuse et très … « en croix » …. croix que j’apprécie particulièrement comme ornement graphique (mécréante je vous dis !!) … Mais quand même … croix + lumière + blanc + Pâques …. ceci est une pensée émue pour les étudiants de Garissa, au Kenya ….

Ma découverte ? le « MECHANT Studio » ! (ça ne s’invente pas !) – Qui est le MECHANT ? en l’occurence une « Méchante » Française, Cristine Cez, partie barouder et créer de jolis objets, dont beaucoup de croix, ses « Imperfect cross » ….

MECHANT Studio

« I am Cez , a French Designer and Interior Designer.
In 2004 i decided to change my life, i sold my Dental Office, my house and i left France to Canada, then Vietnam with my 10 years old son, Hugo. No more Dentistry… I started to learn online to become an Interior Designer… and i did it. My travels all around the world are still inspiring my creations, my state of mind, my passion for Design…
I create lamps with paper, wool, items bargained in flea market, on the streets, in farms, or with items I brought back form countries I used to live or travel… I create also decorative items for home with recycled denim but not only…Hope you will enjo my my creations!!!! » Cristine Cez-MechantStudio

Gem Stone light green neckless - €21  - handmade neckless made of handmade white clay beads, wood, shell, and light green gem stones... MECHANT Studio ("I am Cez , a French Designer and Interior Designer.")Gem Stone light green neckless   – handmade neckless made of handmade white clay beads, wood, shell, and light green gem stones… by MECHANT Studio 

 Wreath bracelet cross - MECHANT StudioMECHANT Studio-  Wreath bracelet cross  – jute and cotton rope and white clay cross

MECHANT Studio - Three Imperfect BraceletsMECHANT Studio – Three « Imperfect » Bracelets - clay beads and cross

MECHANT Studio-  IMPERFECT CROSSMECHANT Studio-  IMPERFECT CROSS - white cross to hang on wall or to wear…

MECHANT Studio - Huge RosaryMECHANT Studio - the Huge Rosary (for your wall ..) This big rosary is made of wooden beads and a big imperfect cross, engraved with the word ROCK.  Length : 90 cm

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