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22/11/2016

EXCHANGE-BIJOU 2 – Tal EFRAIM – TREASURES from Shenkar

Tal Efraim

Discovered when the Final Project Presentation 2016 at Shenkar

« Tal Efraim is a graduate of Shenkar College of Engineering, Design and Art. Currently living and working from Israel, her work is driven out of her sketchbook, where she documents the world around her, creating a « dictionary » of design possibilities. Her work is made of gold, silver, porcelain and a variety of gemstones. » (Klimt02)

« My pieces are a translation of how I view the world, especially the many details that I take note of. By exposing my work, I feel as if I can share my perspective with others. When my pieces are purchased it is a great honor, as well as helps me explore the definition of what wearable art is all about. / Tal Mohr »

Tal Barash Efraim - Final Project Presentation 2016 at ShenkarTal Efraim – Final Project Presentation 2016 at Shenkar – neckpiece

Shenkar 2016 - Tal Barash Efraim - Final Project Presentation Tal fraimShenkar 2016 – Final Project Presentation  - neckpiece

Tal Barash Efraim - closeup of my my design  Tal Efraim - closeup of my my design 

 Tal Barash Efraim - Jewelry Design Dept. Shenkar  juillet 2016  - brooch Tal Efraim - Jewelry Design Dept. Shenkar  juillet 2016  – brooch

Tal Efraim, Brooch: Heart, 2016, Fine Silver, 925 silver, porcelain, pearls, 9.5 x 9.5 x 1 cm  From series: Connectionary. Photo by: Ilan Besor Tal Efraim –   Brooch: Heart, 2016, Fine Silver, 925 silver, porcelain, pearls, 9.5 x 9.5 x 1 cm  From series: Connectionary. Photo by: Ilan Besor
« What piece or work has given you the most satisfaction? « As part of my collection Connectionary, I designed a broche titled Heart. It captures my aesthetical view of what jewellery art is all about; having a great amount of details, being made of a variety of materials, and yet still consisting of an overall look that is very clean. »

«  By documenting details such as day-to-day mechanical joints, swivels, hinges and physical connections of objects in my sketchbook, I create my own private alphabet, which will later be transformed into the language of my designs.
My pieces are all one of a kind – whilst I can make to order any piece several times, each will be a little different due to the nature of handwork and craft.« 

 

Tal Efraim interviewed by Klimt02

(when you discover that « your discovery », « your « coup de coeur »" is not anymore (yet !!) « yours ….. :-( & :-) )

 

* 2017 Exhibition  06-15 Oct 2017  XI Florence Biennale of Art.  Fortezza da Basso, Florence, Italy
* Education:
2012-2016 Jewelery Design BA, Shenkar College of Engineering, Design and Art, Ramat Gan, Israel
2007 Design & Technology Major, Masada College, Sydney, Australia
* Group Exhibitions:
2016 Glasses Design Exhibition in Opticana Glasses Museum, Tel Aviv, Israel
2016 Graduate Show Exhibition, Shenkar, Ramat-Gan, Israel 
* Grants, Awards and Residences:
2015 H. Stern excellence award in Jewelry Design for high achievements, Shenkar College

 

Image de prévisualisation YouTube

 

 

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16/06/2016

EXPO ‘Bodies and Minds’ – Galeria Romanelli, Firenze (IT) – 17-19 Juin 2016

« Bodies and Minds »

Mañana se inaugura la muestra “Bodies and Minds” en la Galeria Romanelli en Firenze !
La muestra curada por Antonia Alampi y Riccardo Lami que reúne el trabajo realizado por Lavinia RossettiDaria BorovkovaFederica SalaSana KhalilGiulia Savino y mi (Maria Ignacia Walker) obra « Trascendieron ».

Invito a todos los que se encuentran por estos lados del mundo y aprovecho de agradecer a Alchimia contemporary Jewellery school in Firenze y Jorge Manilla.

 Opening: Friday June 17, from 6.30 pm

"Bodies & Minds"

Alchimia – Contemporary Jewellery School presents :
BODIES AND MINDS
With jewellery by  Daria Borovkova, Sana Khalil, Lavinia Rossetti, Federica SalaGiulia Savino and Marìa Ignacia Walker (Mi Walky).
Curated by Antonia Alampi and Riccardo Lami.
Galleria Romanelli,  Firenze
Alchimia is happy to present BODIES AND MINDS, a group exhibition opening on June 17 at 6.30pm, featuring the work of its recent MFA graduates, choreographed as a conversation between contemporary jewellery and the sculptures and fascinating spaces of the historical Galleria Romanelli.
BODIES AND MINDS wants to incite a reflection on the hybrid nature of the contemporary artistic jewel, on the relationship between the body and the mind, on the constraints determined by physical prerequisites vis-à-vis conceptual investigations, between the weight of tradition and the fragility of innovation.

galeria Romanelli Firenzegaleria Romanelli Firenze

In 1829 the sculptor Lorenzo Bartolini transforms an abandoned fourteenth century church in a studio where his student Pasquale Romanelli, followed by five generations of male heirs, develops the Romanelli Gallery. Hundred-eighty-seven years later six female jewellery artists take over the space and its collection challenging disciplinary and gender hierarchies. BODIES AND MINDS offers unexpected connections and ironic cultural appropriations, in a path that relates illustrious examples of copies and originals from the history of Italian sculpture to the experimental relational dimension of contemporary jewellery.

 galeria Romanelli Firenzegaleria Romanelli Firenze

A large crowd of rings asks us to reflect on the manufacturing of our cultural identities, both as individuals and as members of larger communities, in « Being and Belonging » by Daria Borovkova.
Another critical mass of circular shapes, now without a specific identity, characterizes « In Conflict. Moments of Strike » by Sana Khalil, a tribute or cynical celebration to the impossibility of the artist to perform direct political agency over the world.
While such ambitions can only strengthen our sense of inadequacy, « 1: 20,000″ by Giulia Savino invites us to remain suspended, to let ourselves be carried away by those states of temporary sense of satisfaction that keep us above the world through the appropriation of real and imaginary cities.
On a more personal level, « Madeleine » by Lavinia Rossetti evokes the ephemeral existence of our memories, finding ways to give form to the essence of significant moments.
A similar sense of transience characterizes « Trascendieron » by María Ignacia Walker in a tribute to our daily losses, a possible humorous comment to the Western impulse to preserve and collect.
Finally, and gently, « True Lies. A Collection of Oxymoron » by Federica Sala confronts us with existential questions: what is the true nature of our experience or how do we define reality, whispering, perhaps, what contemporary jewelry wants .

Daria Borovkova  - "Being and Belonging"  2016 Daria Borovkova  – « Being and Belonging »  2016

Sana Khalil  - Alchimia Graduation Show 2014: Sana Khalil

Giulia Savino - " 1 : 20.000" collectionGiulia Savino -  » 1 : 20.000″ collection – Geneve necklace

Lavinia Rossetti - Madeleine - 25-26 March 2016   (ALCHIMIA): Lavinia Rossetti – Madeleine

María Ignacia Walker Contemporary Jewellery - 2015 - TRASCENDIERON: María Ignacia Walker   – 2015 – TRASCENDIERON

True Lies by Federica Sala  2016 - RINGS True Lies by Federica Sala  2016 – rings


On the same evening Alchimia presents at its premises « Wonder/Wander« , a group show with jewellery by Anna Okamoto Gayton, Dana AL-Nafisi, Diana Pantea, Lena Kosztyucsenko, Sehnaz Erdal, all international graduating students of its BFA program.

 

Galleria D’arte Romanelli

Borgo San Frediano 70,
Firenze
ITALY

25/01/2016

Selection 4 SCHMUCK 2016 : Kadri Mälk

Kadri Mälk,  BLACK BEAUTY

Congrats to all the artists who made the SCHMUCK 2016 list, on show at the Handwerksmesse during #munichjewelleryweek  24/02–1/03/2016

Congrats to all the artists who made the SCHMUCK 2016 list, on show at the Handwerksmesse during #munichjewelleryweek / #jewellery #brooch by Kadri Mälk     brooch by Kadri Mälk

Kadri Mälk  Brooch: Very Guilty 2010  Siberian jet, black rhodium plated white gold, spinel, tourmalines  11.5 x 6.6 x 1.2 cm: Kadri Mälk  Brooches : « Very Guilty » & « Guilty » 2010  Siberian jet, black rhodium plated white gold, spinel, tourmalines  11.5 x 6.6 x 1.2 cm

interview :« Kadri Mälk – Love Me Or Leave Me Or Let Me Be Lonely »
By Aaron Patrick Decker (THANKS to AJF)

I ascended old stairs to a cozy apartment in Tallinn, Estonia, where I had the pleasure of interviewing the renowned Estonian jeweler Kadri Mälk. As the head of the metals department in the Estonian Academy of Arts, she shines a spotlight on younger Estonian jewelers. She has given rise to a generation whose work is strong, individual, and definitely Estonian. Mälk’s work is dark, poetic, and wholly of her own voice. Utilizing such traditional jewelry materials as gold, silver, gemstones, and jet, she creates a recipe whose melancholy fragrances permeate through all her work. 
Aaron Patrick Decker: How did you come to jewelry?
Kadri Mälk: Initially I studied painting for four years and really enjoyed it. Before that, I worked in a publishing house. After studying painting, I suddenly felt that maybe it wasn’t for me, maybe I needed something more intimate. After that I went to the Academy to study jewelry. I was either 28 or 29 when I graduated. I felt somehow that I was late, an autumn flower. I remained a freelance artist and was on my own for about nine years; meanwhile I was invited to teach. Initially it was just a small workload, like once a week. I enjoyed staying in my atelier and working on my own schedule and freedom. I liked it so much, no due dates and a kind of wild life, a lifestyle I still really appreciate.
After graduation I began some studies in stonework. First in St. Petersburg in a stone-cutting factory, a huge factory that received quite high-quality raw materials from Siberia. Then I studied gemology in Finland at the Lahti Design Institute for two years. I was offered to prolong my studies in London in 1993–94 and receive the highest degree one could get in gemological studies. During that time in Estonia, there was no one in the field of gemology. It’s a small field in general, but in Estonia, no one had this sort of certification.
But then my professor, Kuldkepp, fell ill and couldn’t return to the department anymore. Until this point I had worked alone. Leading a department is not just about being an ideological leader, there are other concerns about finances, and finding a team that works. You have to find people who fit together. I had no experience in this work so I was very afraid of the proposal to take the department. And especially since I was offered the gemological certification, which was seductive.
Simultaneously, I got a chance to work in Germany. I was young, bold, and at that time ready to jump. I applied to Bernd Munsteiner’s studio. He rejected me at first, saying he had too much work to also teach an apprentice. Somehow he changed his mind and decided to bring me in. They were intrigued by Estonia, the wild northern forest, so they said okay. He was concerned about my age and the time allotted; to learn stone cutting and faceting requires a large amount of time. I went in there not being able to speak German, and they had a certain dialect. I had some stone-cutting experience from St. Petersburg, but not at the level at which his workshop operated. It was very generous of him to take me.
We began at 7 a.m. and the first break was at 10:30 for some coffee. It was very tight and regimented. Funnily, during lunch they turned off the power in the shop; I thought I could work more during this time, but it was not allowed. He didn’t believe in the beginning that I could learn facet cutting, but at the end he was happy with where I got. I remember having a notebook and just trying to write down everything during lunchtime. I wouldn’t eat. I’d just write what the workers were saying. The old knowledge. It was my passion, stones.
You have said you were close with your professor; can you talk about your decision to take over the department?
Kadri Mälk: She was the reason I decided to take over the department. It was kind of fatal serendipity—as I saw it then, but not anymore. I had to do it because she could not. She was an extraordinary personality in the time and circumstances, she did not fit the environment, didn’t fit the times. If you read her writings, you could tell she had such a drive sourced from somewhere else. She had such a mission to pass on things to people, not in a direct way but in an indirect and metaphoric way. Her teaching methods were not pedagogical at all, she was often much more abstract. She locked the students in the room and said, “Just work.” All should be concentration, creativity driven to the work. No cinema, no theater, no magazines, no outside information, and it should all come from yourself, come through you. Extreme methods, but very effective. She wanted you to achieve the maximum. She was not very communicative, didn’t go anywhere, didn’t move around, her efforts were very concentrated on certain students. I can’t find the right words to completely describe her, but she wanted students to open up by closing off.
Do you think becoming a professor so early shaped you as an artist and continues to shape you?
Kadri Mälk: I was a baby professor. I was elected when I was 37. I had already been a renowned artist for some time, but as an educator, administrator, or team member, I had no experience. Looking back, I realize now the trust from admin and colleagues when I took over the department. My creative past supported me and proved to them I could survive in the school. Just recently somebody outside of the academy, and artists, came to me and said, “Now, Kadri, I realize you have done it well…” In the beginning, others were hesitant because I was seemingly unsuitable for the job. The highest hesitations came from me. I was unsure if I could rise to the occasion. And when the women came, 15 years later, it was some confirmation.
I just liked to make my pieces. And it’s so funny, I still go about my work in a similar way. Nowadays students are much more oriented by a schedule and thinking about making work for exhibition. Deadlines. My satisfaction came from my pieces, from the process. I liked how they came to me, how they happened. When I was in school, learning about the art field was not included. The professor tried to keep this off us, all these associations, how this works, etc. I remember asking her what happens when I graduate. She didn’t tell me anything about the real life of artists. It was all about the work. It was a conscious decision to keep the art world away from us.

Kadri Mälk  necklace "Amnesia" 2010  - ebony, tourmaline, silver, - photo Tanel VeenreKadri Mälk  necklace « Amnesia » 2010  – ebony, tourmaline, silver, – photo Tanel Veenre

Kadri Mälk - "Mid-day of life" 2008 brooch - jet, silver, almandine, smoky quartz - photo Tanel Veenre: Kadri Mälk – « Mid-day of life » 2008 brooch – jet, silver, almandine, smoky quartz – photo Tanel Veenre

Do you think your work changed during this period?
Kadri Mälk: No, not because of the Academy. The majority of my time went into the Academy, but this didn’t affect my work. In the first years, we gave assignments to students in the form of certain themes. Later on, especially at the MA level, where the study is more conceptual, they must meet their choices themselves to reinforce their spiritual identities.
Someone asked me, “What do you like best about teaching?” I feel lucky that I have the possibility to notice and follow how personalities develop and begin to blossom; how new talented personalities emerge in a creative surrounding; and how they act and react. And how passionate they may be in their work! It’s the achievement of every member of our staff.
Not much changed about me, either. Of course I had to modify my talking towards topics, concentrate, and learn to convey or see the methods that worked best, but at the core I didn’t change.
It’s very different to be just a teacher rather than the department leader. You are responsible for all that happens. The biggest difference is that the academy and the students are number one, followed by your work and your family. The academy and the students are number one. They can call me at any time if they need. I feel better in this. They know that they can come, they are not lost.
I think that’s quite admirable. I haven’t heard of another professor so invested in the program in the ways you are. What do you think some of the most important things to pass on to your students are, what do you hope they take away from you and the Academy?
Kadri Mälk: A kind of attitude, that you should believe in yourself. People shouldn’t take you off your path. Younger artists are vulnerable, in a condition to be shaped or reshaped; it’s important to tell them or convince them that whatever happens you should turn that attention in to yourself, otherwise you get lost. If you take into consideration all the opinions you hear, you get lost; there is so much noise. You don’t know where to look or where to go. You don’t orient yourself any longer in the world. Believe in yourself … it’s hard to when you’re young. Believe and be strong in your core.
Then your core begins to fortify?
Kadri Mälk: Yes, it becomes stronger. It crystalizes, the elements that are more important, the ones that are harder, take shape, and the rest falls apart. It comes with time, you shouldn’t force or exaggerate. You have to be patient.
There are so many conferences, so many books asking the big question—is jewelry art? It’s not my task to answer it.
My comment to it is very simple: love me or leave me or let me be lonely. 
Or to put it differently: take it or leave it or let me be lonely.
What do I mean with that? It’s very simple. There is always another way out. It’s not only taking or leaving. There is another possibility which is hardly seen. You just have to be patient and look carefully.
Also, the creative process has confusion, has crisis. You should not be afraid of these things, they are natural. Fear that your next work will fail is so very normal. Crisis is normal in art making. Art is always about starting again in hesitation.
What are your impressions of younger jewelers now coming into the field, at large and in Estonia?
Kadri Mälk: (long pause) It is very hard to generalize, even here the local scene is quite diverse. You can se
more design-oriented work, more personal work. I try to encourage these people who are afraid of having somehow veiled, personal, or exceptional ways of expressing. If they compare themselves to what is happening in different places with people their age, they begin unconsciously to bring other aesthetics into their own work. I want to encourage people who are different, who are slightly insecure.
Francis Bacon said, if you are going to decide to be an artist, you have got to decide that you are not going to be afraid to make a fool of yourself.
Making art is so simple—all you have to do is to wait quietly, staring at a blank wall until the drops of blood appear on your forehead. Be aware that criticism always comes along with creative work. If you can’t handle it, you have to quit.
How frequently and easily success transforms into depression! You can avoid it by leaving some loose threads in your work, some unresolved part that carries you forward in your new work. What you need to know in your next piece is silently present in your last. You can find it while looking in patience. It’s like a seed crystal for your next destination.
I am not really analytical like most. I am interested mostly in my unconscious choices, what I like and what triggers me.
If someone were to ask about your work, how would you describe it to them?
Kadri Mälk: Look at the originals. You should look at the original pieces and see for yourself.
Do you think that is an important idea, to see things in person?
Kadri Mälk: Yes. We are so much in the age of reproduction. We see the screen or the page with the picture. We don’t look at the original anymore, we don’t feel the tactility of the pieces or taste the iron. It is very harmful to humankind to go about it in this manner. Go to the originals. Otherwise it is so meta-meta, you don’t feel, you don’t know the scale, the details, or the material from the copies.
What are some of the things that inspire you?
Kadri Mälk: I don’t know what inspiration is exactly. Sometimes things are more intense and sometimes less intense. Sometimes I feel that I can capture things, forms, colors, something in the air, and sometimes I feel like sand is running through my fingers.
Consciously I cannot, but it comes more from my subconscious. There’s some differentiation between mental and physical subconscious. One is staying here (Mälk points to her head) and one is here (she points to her stomach), the first is mental and then the second is more gut, subconscious. The feelings are very different. Or maybe the frequencies are different. I like life in all its expressions, that’s my source
In talking about those two polar ways—analytical and emotional—in your work, do you bring them together, is there one that’s more important to you?
Kadri Mälk: Usually it’s subconscious, these decisions you make. They are made before they are at your conscious level. You made the decisions in a big fog. Just as in crystallization, they come into being. And when they are there, it is your choice to call them either consciously made or born out of the sky.
Looking at your work, there is a quality of instantaneous moment; going deeper, you find more and more. The work is quite striking and emotionally charged. Seems very palpable, like it has a heartbeat. There is also a melancholy quality to many of your pieces. Is that a conscious decision or a more subconscious one?
Kadri Mälk: A tiger cannot avoid his stripes! (She laughs.)
That’s a great analogy. 
Kadri Mälk: I am very shy describing my work. I am afraid I cannot reach the truth through verbalization.
There is this quality of Estonian jewelers, not a reluctance, but an ability to keep the integrity of the work. It’s hard to describe the work prescriptively in its conceptual and formal functions, often it acts like poetry, it speaks with power but is not completely resolute. What is your opinion of this attitude?
Kadri Mälk: When I think of my jewelry, it’s easier to describe it. “It’s blue, violet, black, and purple. There is fog, there are shades of magenta.” You can be precise without being clear. And unclear may also be precise. It’s very much an oxymoron.

Kadri Mälk, Downcast Face, 2013, brooch, black rhodium-plated white gold, black baroque pearl, black diamonds, black diamond dust, 120 x 72 x 12 mm, artist’s collection, photo: Tiit RammulKadri Mälk, Downcast Face, 2013, brooch, black rhodium-plated white gold, black baroque pearl, black diamonds, black diamond dust, 120 x 72 x 12 mm, artist’s collection, photo: Tiit Rammul

Being precise but unclear, can you talk more about this notion?
Kadri Mälk: It’s really a sort of hologram, like a puzzle. As a notion and phenomenon, I think it’s possible. 
It is an interesting facet of Estonian jewelry. Sort of irresolute.
Kadri Mälk: Yeah, it’s in a stage of becoming. Being on the way.
Yeah, it’s not negative, its more open. 
Kadri Mälk: Yes, an ambivalence. 
Is there something that you want people to get from your work?
Kadri Mälk: To share the unsharable. What often happens is that the viewer approaches in a superficial way, which is natural. On the foreground they see materials, especially if there are unusual materials.
I’ve used a lot of moleskin in my work and it’s taken a kind of attraction or peculiarity in my work. I don’t feel a need to explain the choices I’ve made. How it came to me, it was just an incident. Or a happy accident.
When all my stuff was stolen from my atelier, I found a coat of my grandmother’s from the war, made out of moleskin. I took it apart, slices of extremely thin, like silk, soft silk paper like. Then I saw these pieces. The tenderness at first, the sensuality of the material, and that the fur grew in only one direction. It was so thin, the fur. It had such a strong character, though. I started to work with this, used it a lot, the coat is now gone into all the pieces. I also think the animal is present in the work. The mole, he’s blind, he doesn’t have sight but has extreme animal spirit. All this orientation in time and space. I studied how they moved, their lives, did more research. How they were trapped and caught. This animalism was powerful and important for me in these works. But you aren’t going to retell the story. If you put it into a story, it’s banal. 
Can you talk more about the jet in your work?
Kadri Mälk: When I carve it, like timber or wood, it has nerves like a human body. The stones have structure, they direct you. They tell you where to go. You should go there and you shouldn’t make the wrong decision. There is a negotiation with the stone when I cut it. Jet is mute, silencium. Only a big dust is coming. Your lungs are filled with jet powder. Like stones are directing you in advance, there are inclusions, by heat they will crack more. Jet is completely mute. This is what fascinates me. It’s not much used in jewelry anymore. 
I lack the habit and custom and will to interpret my works after they have been completed. The work either tells you something or it doesn’t. Once you have completed it, then keep quiet. The work must know whether it radiates or not. The piece of jewelry in your mind, in your imagination, is always correct and beautiful. Resistance starts when you try to convert it into material. Oh, la la! Materials are like elementary particles—charged, heavily charged sometimes, but indifferent. They don’t tell you much, you have to tell them the truth.
You have staged events and produced a number of books—JUST MUST, Castle in the Air, etc.—about Estonian jewelry and jewelers. You have made the work coming from the Academy available to a much larger audience. Give us your thoughts about publishing these books and what your intentions were at the time you did them.
Kadri Mälk: Firstly, I love books. I love their smell and the shade of the voice when you turn the page and then unexpectedly see a new image … It’s both emotional and intellectual. Since 1989 I have published twenty-something publications, some of them out-of-print already. The first ones were really ugly ducklings, black-and-white … I’ve strived always to tell something different with them, it has been my passion. Indeed, they have been acting as ambassadors of Estonian jewelry in the world, although it was not intended. So many students coming from abroad have said the pull came from the books. Strange! Usually nowadays the urge comes from the Internet. 
To make an impression abroad is not as important as to make an impression in your own soul.
Thank you.

 Kadri Mälk - "Fresh, dried, only young" 2001 brooch - sarcodon imbricatus (mushroom), silver, almandines: Kadri Mälk – « Fresh, dried, only young » 2001 brooch – sarcodon imbricatus (mushroom), silver, almandines

Kadri Mälk, Medusa IV – ehisnõel (oksüdeeritud hõbe, kumm). coop.artun.ee/nope5/: Kadri Mälk, Medusa IV – ehisnõel (oksüdeeritud hõbe, kumm)

23/09/2015

EXPO during JOYA Barcelona OFF 2015 : ‘To Recover’ – Klimt02 Gallery, Barcelona (ES) – 7 Oct.-7 Nov. 2015

exhibition being part of « OFF JOYA » 2015

http://www.joyabarcelona.com/images/Prensa/logo_joya.jpg

To RecoverKlimt02 Gallery

Opening : 7 October from 19 h.

To Recover Exhibition  / 07Oct - 7Nov2015 Klimt02 Gallery  (Ted Noten Superbitch Bag, 2000 / Superbitch Bag Revisited, 2015)

Artist list   Simon CottrellKarl FritschGésine HackenbergKarin JohanssonJiro KamataSari LiimattaStefano MarchettiTed NotenNoon Passama –  Annelies PlanteydtTore SvenssonLisa WalkerManon van Kouswijk

Manon van Kouswijk Pearl Grey necklace, 2008 / Pearl Grey Revisited necklace, 2015 Glass elements (saucer, hand formed cup handle with attached glass beads), diverse glass and plastic beads, polyester thread, glue.  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Manon van Kouswijk Pearl Grey necklace, 2008 / Pearl Grey Revisited necklace, 2015 Glass elements (saucer, hand formed cup handle with attached glass beads), diverse glass and plastic beads, polyester thread, glue.  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

The original « Pearl Grey » of 2009 was an assemblage work consisting of found and made elements of porcelain, glass, wood, plastic and pearl. It referenced a traditional cup and saucer of which the cup had been magically replaced by a bead necklace. For this new work I have translated that idea to the typology of a glass ‘saucer and cup’. It is again a combination of found and made elements but this time the work is completely transparent; almost like an x-ray of it’s predecessor

Gésine Hackenberg Still Life, 2009 / Pink Balancing Glass brooch, 2015 Glass by Theresienthal, silver  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Gésine Hackenberg Still Life, 2009 / Pink Balancing Glass brooch, 2015 Glass by Theresienthal, silver  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

The ‘Still Life’ Brooches that I have made between 2009 and 2012 can be seen as a contemporary interpretation of 17th and 18th century Dutch Still Life paintings. This subject was preferable used to portray items of daily life that were emotionally and economically significant for people of that time.  Within my ‘Still Lifes’, I sliced existing glasswork and rearranged them into new compositions. They represented a perfect translation of the three dimensional to the two dimensional, the realistic vista of the glasses to the medium of jewellery. The body is taking on the role of the canvas as it were…  Within the new work I explored another way of looking at tableware than in a static composition: I wanted to express a certain precarious dynamic that is inherent to drinking glasses during a sociable meal. I tried to catch this moment of a glass tumbling, undecided yet if it is going to fall or stay upright.

 Sari Liimatta But I love Him object, 2005 / But they don´t love him pendant, 2015 Glass beads, metal link, thread (polyamide), a plastic toy  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Sari Liimatta But I love Him object, 2005 / But they don´t love him pendant, 2015 Glass beads, metal link, thread (polyamide), a plastic toy  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

Just as men are not just men, and women just women, meat is never just meat. It has it´s past and origin, a story which is so often simply forgotten. Living creatures which are very much alive until they are nothing more than materials, for those who still choose to use them. Even the life before their death is so often more than problematic, as we all know. As we all know.

 Annelies Planteijdt Beautiful City - Pink Stairs necklace, 2001 / Beautiful City-Pink Stairs Black Crystal necklace, 2015 Gold, Tantalum, pigment  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Annelies Planteijdt Beautiful City – Pink Stairs necklace, 2001 / Beautiful City-Pink Stairs Black Crystal necklace, 2015 Gold, Tantalum, pigment  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015 

 I started to re-consider a piece from 2001, that never has been sold, although I liked it very much, ‘Beautiful City – Pink Stairs’.  This piece is really symmetrical, so I decided to look for a way to separate it in two parts and finish both parts in a different way, in order to get two different pieces. I have re-collected parts of other (unsold) pieces from about the same time (1999 and 2000) and have been re-approaching and re-thinking them: I made ‘Crystals’ with them, like I did in my most recent work. So I have been mixing time and thinking. And size: the sizes I used earlier were different from the sizes I used in the later ‘Beautiful City’ series, they wouldn’t have fit. But because the ‘Crystals’ are liquid (they adapt to the square) the size of the elements was not importantanymore. So I could re-take these old pieces into the new time now, I have re-used them, re-connected them.
This ‘expansion’ offered me more possibilities: I re-used the material I already had without loss of material or time. The possibility to re-make the old pieces still exists. And it gave me two new pieces. So I multiplied my possibilities. A new life.

 Noon Passama Formal Research - A necklace, 2015 / Formal Research - H rings, 2015 Rigid clay, silver, gold  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Noon Passama Formal Research – A necklace, 2015 / Formal Research – H rings, 2015 Rigid clay, silver, gold  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

 Formal Research – A necklace (2015) composing of six chain units is the starting point of the group of six rings. A closed-end loop of each ring was divided in sections, one / two / three /… / six, by the difference between the fat and thin parts. The works were made under the following keywords: dividing / sequencing / sizing.
Formal Research initially focused on one classical type of jewellery: the chain. The project is mainly about the form of each connecting chain unit and how the unit connects to its neighbours.
During the sculpting process, the shapes were transformed because of them being in the hand and through time. I did not edit the outcomes and will present the rings as they are. The try-outs are the finals and vice versa.

 Stefano Marchetti Untitled brooch, 2007 / Untitled Revisited brooch, 2015 Silver, silver and titan powder, epoxy resin  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Stefano Marchetti Untitled brooch, 2007 / Untitled Revisited brooch, 2015 Silver, silver and titan powder, epoxy resin  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.:

 In the Nineties, in the making of the older brooch, my goal was to control the metal, to have the metal do whatever I wanted. In this latest brooch, made a few days ago, I let instead the metal take control over myself, and let it take me wherever its will would go.

Tore Svensson Mr. T brooch, 2011 / Mr. T Revisited brooch, 2015 (5 different versions) Veneer wood, acrylic paint, silver  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Tore Svensson Mr. T brooch, 2011 / Mr. T Revisited brooch, 2015 (5 different versions) Veneer wood, acrylic paint, silver  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

The reason why I chosen my self-portrait, is that it is probably one of my most well known pieces of jewellery. It is made in steel and etched.  The material and techniques I mostly work with. For the Re-version I saw out the silhouette in 2 mm veneer, divided the image in 3 parts and painted them in similar but for each piece different colours, before I glued them together. The fact that they are divided in three parts, with the dark sawing-line between, gives them a comic-like impression.
This impression is even emphasised by the bigger size, which is possible by the lightness of the material, and is completely different from the original steel-one. While the surface of the steel-portrait and other previous work was the key technology for building the image, the colour for some years been a part of my jewellery.

 

To revisit, remake, salvage, reinterpret, adapt, convert, converse, rethink…
  Why have we asked some of the artists we work with as gallery owners to reinterpret one of their works? We could say it’s because we’re interested in talking about time. And by “revisiting” we mean discussing the notion of time. But in what way? That’s the question.
Time passes, it is made, interpreted, felt and suffered, it escapes, drifts away, becomes trapped or stretched, sometimes it is intelligently ignored and, why not, it is exercised. Reinterpreting a work, a fiction or precis is a way of addressing time, a way of exploring a landscape in order to try and understand it. And we thought this exercise would provide an interesting opportunity to discuss time.
Revisiting in order to reflect… an exercise for the artist.
  Are there any changes in these artists’ works? Should there be? Is time involved? Without a shadow of a doubt, the answer is yes. But that barely scrapes the surface of what we want to know.
We’re more likely to find out what we want to know if the work enables us to answer questions such as: What kind of time is involved? Is there any usefulness? Is there any spirituality? Are there any aesthetics? Is there any abstraction? Is there any progress?
The exhibition is also designed to be understood through an analysis of the different types of answers provided by the works as a whole. As you will see, there are answers that simplify, offering minor changes, non-answers, coherent answers (if you have prior knowledge of the artist’s trajectory), inspired answers, uninventive answers… As we have said, evaluating the “revisits” as a whole provides additional knowledge.
When it comes down to it, what we most value is the sensation we observe and feel when the artist takes some distance and moves away from the centre stage in an attempt to provide an answer. As observers, we believe this circumstance helps to achieve universality and thus provide an intellectual satisfaction, that of communicating and objectifying the creation to the full in order to express and play with a more authentic reality.
Revisiting in order to look afresh… the viewer’s exercise.
We switch from observation to understanding, and vice versa. We observe in order to find differences between similar things and we understand when we find similarities between different things. Accustomed as we are today to viewing several pieces in a highly random fashion, pausing to stop in order to take a fresh look at a work “inaugurated” some time ago is another exercise we wish to propose. This exercise may help us assimilate better in this era of accumulation and, on occasions, superficiality. There can be no doubt that the way in which a work attracts and engages us is based on the knowledge we may have of it.
Knowledge without criticism is an indication of the end of everything. Yet, on the other hand, what can be said of criticism without knowledge? Are we capable of enjoying what these workers of art offer us? Will we be capable of evaluating what they show us? Can we offer knowledge-based criticism? Frankly, we find there is a lack of humility on the part of the viewer. And we’re all viewers.
Let’s enjoy this opportunity.

 

 

Klimt02 Gallery
Riera de Sant Miquel 65
08006 -  Barcelona
Monday to Friday / 11 -14 and 16-19 h.

 

 

 

01/09/2015

EXPO ‘coOperation – GARNISH’ – Gallery Velvet da Vinci, San Francisco (USA) – 19 Aout-20 Sept. 2015

co-operation – garnish

A collaborative exhibition organized by Brigitte Martin and Rachel Timmins

Artists’ Reception:  Friday August 21, 6-8pm

co-operation - garnish

 A garnish can be anything from an adornment that adds or enhances the body (human or animal) to a functional or nonfunctional object that decorates and spices up a room. This exhibition will ask viewers and participants to examine the idea of a garnish made by 2 different subsets of makers who have come together to create an embellishment that satisfies both.

Participating Artists:    Suzanne Amendolara / Dan DiCaprio — Christiana Byrne / David Lee — Catherine Chandler / Sonya Scott — Brian Ferrell / Jillian Moore –  Heidi Gerstacker / Masumi KataokaEmily Gill / Jaime Sawka — Charity Hall / Francesca Vitali Peter Hoogeboom / Maia Houtman — Nicole Jacquard / Annie Fensterstock — Lauren Kalman / Kipp Bradford –  Satomi Kawai / Nikki Couppee — Thomas Mann / Wayne Werner –  Bruce Metcalf / Evin Dubois — Tom Muir / Caitlin Skelcey — Vincent Pontillo Verrastro / Sharon Massey –  Mette Saabye / Pernille Mouritzen — Marissa Saneholtz /Michael Dale BernardLinda Savineau / Steve Shelby — Olga Starostina / Corey AckelmireBillie Theide / Brooke Marks-SwansonRachel Timmins / Brigitte Martin — Aric Verrastro /Randy Long

 Satomi Kawai & Nikki Couppee, Neogems (Necklace), Plastic, etched copper, resin, pigment, sterling silver, brass, plexiglass, found shells, faux and real pearls, faux silver foil, hologram laminateSatomi Kawai & Nikki Couppee, Neogems (Necklace), Plastic, etched copper, resin, pigment, sterling silver, brass, plexiglass, found shells, faux and real pearls, faux silver foil, hologram laminate

Brian Ferrell & Jillian Moore, Clompe Cluster (Brooch), basswood, polymer clay, resin, paint, waxBrian Ferrell & Jillian Moore, Clompe Cluster (Brooch), basswood, polymer clay, resin, paint, wax

Peter Hoogeboom & Maja Houtman, Artichoke (Brooch), Ceramics (slipcasting), metalwork (basketry), silversmithing silver, porcelainPeter Hoogeboom & Maja Houtman, Artichoke (Brooch), Ceramics (slipcasting), metalwork (basketry), silversmithing silver, porcelain

Tom Muir & Caitlin Skelcey, Expel, ABS Plastic, Sterling Silver, Automotive Paint and  ClearcoatTom Muir & Caitlin Skelcey, Expel, ABS Plastic, Sterling Silver, Automotive Paint and  Clearcoat

Aric & Randy Verrastro & Long, Daydreaming (Neckpiece), Canvas, PLA, sterling silver, copper, enamel, china paint, steel, thread, acrylic paint, poly-filAric & Randy Verrastro & Long, Daydreaming (Neckpiece), Canvas, PLA, sterling silver, copper, enamel, china paint, steel, thread, acrylic paint, poly-fil

Linda Savineau & Steve Shelby, Sluggish Meanderings, Hammer printed brass, 3D printed nylon (SLS), driftwoodLinda Savineau & Steve Shelby, Sluggish Meanderings, Hammer printed brass, 3D printed nylon (SLS), driftwood

Marissa Saneholtz & Michael Dale Bernard, "She was lost to her dreams as flowers cascaded upon her." (Neckpiece), Copper, steel, aluminum, silver, maple, vitreous enamel, powder coat, lacquerMarissa Saneholtz & Michael Dale Bernard, « She was lost to her dreams as flowers cascaded upon her. » (Neckpiece), Copper, steel, aluminum, silver, maple, vitreous enamel, powder coat, lacquer

CoOperation Garnish | Velvet da Vinci - Vincent Pontillo-Verrastro and Sharon Massey, Plume, Copper, PLA, graphite, enamel, rare-earth magnets Vincent Pontillo-Verrastro and Sharon Massey, Plume, Copper, PLA, graphite, enamel, rare-earth magnets

 

Statement from the organizers:
A modern metalsmith/metal artist can be found working in traditional metals as well as in nontraditional materials. The designs can range from the classic to the extravagant, and the techniques can either be centuries old or decidedly current. The wide range of expression preferences, design options, materials, and processes has lead within our field to unfavorable misconceptions, misunderstandings and in some cases even outright disdain between artists. Each side considers itself superior to the other, seemingly not appreciating the clear advantages, benefits, and experiences each faction brings to the table. Quoting from Damian Skinner’s 2013 SNAG keynote lecture in Toronto:
“We are all family. Sometimes, family members don’t speak with each other, but we still are one big family. Let’s recognize this fact.”
Can our field overcome family division and send a much-needed signal to the metals + jewelry community? We appreciate and respect our historical past and acknowledge that current materials have a rightful place in jewelry/object making. Arriving at this message is the goal of this exhibition.”  – Brigitte Martin and Rachel Timmins

 

Velvet da Vinci
2015 Polk Street,
San Francisco, CA 94109
Phone: 415-441-0109
Email:  info@velvetdavincigallery.com
Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11am – 6pm, Sunday, 11am – 4pm

 

 

07/11/2011

des « bê-bêtes » nommées EPIPHYTES …. avec Hilary PFEIFER

Classé dans : COUP DE COEUR,Hilary PFEIFER (US),USA — bijoucontemporain @ 0:07

 Hilary Pfeifer

« My artwork explores the ways that humans attempt to control nature, and in turn, nature finds a way to adapt or reassert itself–such as the grass that grows in the cracks of a sidewalk or mildew that forms on an uninsulated wall behind a couch. I express these struggles through craft-influenced sculpture and installations. My anthropomorphized organics live somewhere between humor and curiosity.
A physical object is often the foundation of my work. A floral-printed love seat led me to fantasize about that piece of furniture engaging in a dialogue with the artwork hung above it. A multi-piece “Vertical Garden” was inspired by and scaled to the dimensions of a sheet of composite plywood.
A recent installation, “Natural Selection,” involved a greenhouse filled with bonsai plants who were choosing their own mates as humans do–a blend of instinct and intellect. Another project was inspired by the wallpaper prints of William Morris. The vining leaves and flowers in my three dimensional version escaped the boundaries of the flat wall in places, or travel under the carpet to emerge in another part of the room.
In addition to nature, I also look to body parts, food, germ, or sex toy forms to evoke multiple sensations and references in the small details of my work. My sculptures typically use more than 80% found wood. Aside from the environmental benefits that come from using recycled materials, I feel the inclusion and alteration of found objects triggers the sensory memory in the viewer by creating simultaneously foreign yet familiar associations.
My craft background taught me to bring a complexity to my work through the visual satisfaction of a well-made object. Whether it’s a single functional walking stick for performance, or a large installation made up of 1500 one of a kind swarming bugs, I make sure that each piece can stand alone and also in context to other objects, humans, or architectural elements.  »

des
Hilary Pfeifer -  shoulder piece from 2011 series Epiphytes

 dans Hilary PFEIFER (US)
Hilary Pfeifer -  shoulder piece from 2011 series Epiphytes – detail

 dans USA
Hilary Pfeifer - A ring made for my 2011 Epiphytes series


Hilary Pfeifer - rings for my 2011 Epiphytes series

 

01/10/2011

EXPO ‘five solo-exhibitions – Julia Walter: Love Colour Rage Satisfaction’ – Galerie Marzee, Nijmegen (NL) – 2 Oct.-6 Nov. 2011

 Galerie MARZEE :
Sunday 2 October 2011 at 4 pm

Opening   five solo-exhibitions:

Sara Borgegård
Karin Johansson
Erik Kuiper
Annelies Planteijdt
Julia Walter

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Julia Walter: Love Colour Rage Satisfaction

« I take a big piece of wood and cut it with my saw into a raw form. The decision where to cut comes quickly, intuitive, as precise as it can be and as incidental as possible. This was the first step, now I follow the feeling, a feeling that seems like an ancient knowlege of my ancestors.
Pieces of wood float in buckets of coloured water, soak in the dye, my personal driftwood. The process has started, i try not to interrupt the constant flow of action and reaction. I remember the five elements of a pentagon star, water, wood, fire, soil, metal.
I use my ability to transform and put my energy into materiality. It is a big experiment and a besotted search for the right composition. There are moments of madness, moments of relief, moments of happiness and love, it ́s all in there.
 »

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Julia Walter  necklace

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Julia Walter – 2009 brooch, wood, glass, paint, steel

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Julia Walterone day at the beach, 2009 brooch, wood, chickenbone, shell, paint, steel

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Julia Walter2009 earrings, agate, wood, paint, gold

 

 

 

Galerie Marzee
Lage Markt 3, Waalkade 4
6511 VK – Nijmegen
Netherlands
Telephone: +31 24 3229670
Fax: +31 24 3604688
website: www.marzee.nl
mail: mail@marzee.nl

02/04/2011

EXPO ‘Remake / Remodel’ – Galerie Louise Smit, Amsterdam (NL) – 26 Mars-30 Avril 2011

Classé dans : Exposition/Exhibition,Gal. Louise Smit (NL),Hollande (NL),Ralph BAKKER (NL) — bijoucontemporain @ 1:02

Ralph Bakker jewelry at Gallery Louise Smit : « Remake / Remodel »

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ralph bakker goudsmid
ring « solitaire 6″- gold, silver, enamel, quartz

« Ralph Bakker works gold, silver, precious gems, pearls and enamel into his pieces; the technical books in his possession are all about jewelry; he has, with heart and soul, dedicated himself to the skill and magic of the goldsmith. In the late 80‘s and early 90‘s that was an unusual attitude for a young jewelry designer, particularly in the Netherlands. At that time critics were more concerned about the conceptual aspects of the ornament.
Eventually everything rolled into place. For Ralph Bakker the jewel, with all it‘s traditions and connotations, became the concept of his work. That holds true for the rich colour combinations that he builds up with his materials, for the details in his complex jewelry, for the royal place he reserves for certain stones and foremost for the suggestive effect of the true jewel; in short, the pure seduction.
The underlying theme in all the work that he has exhibited in Galerie Lousie Smit is – the erotic. Sometimes hidden, sometimes explicit. Seduction is in one‘s mind, not only the body. His work is made for women, without consciously excluding men. For him the greatest satisfaction comes from enticing a woman to posses and to wear his jewelry.
I am one of those women. In 1991 I saw a necklace with boat-shaped links of blackened silver, the insides warmly dressed with gold leaf and each boat was set with a white shell. After sleeping on it for one night I knew I had to have that necklace. As an experienced art historian I knew the erotic symbolism of the almond­shape as well as that of the shells with their tempting undersides. But as with all seduction, and perhaps most importantly, I could connect it to a story of my own.
The sensuality in the beautiful collars is ambiguous as well. They are strong in form even though they are made for that transitional place on the body, the sensitive area between neck and breast. From this position the effect of their subtle brilliance in relationship to the face is optimal. Stemming from an ancient tradition the chain mail links make these jewels into objects that willingly form themselves to the body.
Brilliance is reciprocal, suppleness asks to be touched and traditions offer a starting point for one‘s own memories and fantasy. The adage, ‘‘beauty is in the eye of the beholder‘‘, holds more than true for Ralph Bakker‘s enticing jewelry.
«   Marjan Unger – Translation Maria Russo

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Ralph Bakker « the Fly » – earrings

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Ralph Bakker- ‘Lace’ necklace Gold silver & enamel

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Ralph Bakker- earrings: gold, silver, pearls & enamel 

EXPO 'Remake / Remodel' - Galerie Louise Smit, Amsterdam (NL) - 26 Mars-30 Avril 2011 dans Exposition/Exhibition
Necklace  « Remake/remodel Cubes » – gold, silver, enamel – 2011

 

 

 

Galerie Louise Smit
Prinsengracht 615, 1016 HT Amsterdam
tel (020) 625 98 98
fax (020) 428 02 16
gls@xs4all.nl