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04/05/2017

EXCHANGE-BIJOU 2 – Iro KASKANI « en vedette » at Klimt02 !

Iro Kaskani interviewed by Klimt02

« Recently I realized that my curiosity is the most powerful motivating factor behind my work. I’m curious to see things that I visualize becoming facts, to elaborate an idea, to experiment on a certain technique, to see how this or that material is treated, to investigate on however a vision can be a wearable object and yet to see how others perceive my work. »

& Iro Kaskani on Klimt02

Where the LINE is all the story ……….. (aaaah !! « of course » ! she were an architect !!!!)

« Architecture is built environments, planned and designed to function as shelter or vessels of activities and thus it is fostering a physical relationship with the user, inhabitant or viewer. Jewelry takes this physical relationship further into intimacy by the change of scale and placement on the body… »

 Iro Kaskani on Klimt02 - Iro Kaskani Ring: Yes or No, 2017 Silver oxidized, polyester sheet laser printed 3.5 x 3.5 x 3 cm Photo by: Demetris Vattis From series: No news, Good news Iro Kaskani Ring: Yes or No, 2017 Silver oxidized, polyester sheet laser printed 3.5 x 3.5 x 3 cm Photo by: Demetris Vattis From series: No news, Good news

Iro Kaskani on Klimt02 - Iro Kaskani Ring: Why not#15, 2010 Silver oxidized 4 x 4 x 4 cm Photo by: Demetris Vattis From series: Why not?Iro Kaskani Ring: Why not#15, 2010 Silver oxidized 4 x 4 x 4 cm Photo by: Demetris Vattis From series: Why not?

Iro Kaskani on Klimt02 - Iro Kaskani Bangle: Plan B#9, 2008 Silver 15 x 5 x 3 cm Photo by: Demetris Vattis From series: PlanBIro Kaskani - Bangle: Plan B#9, 2008 -  Silver – 15 x 5 x 3 cm Photo by: Demetris Vattis – From series: PlanB

Iro Kaskani on Klimt02 - Iro Kaskani Ring: Why not#5, 2010 Silver oxidized, felt 1.5 x 1.5 x 3 cm Photo by: Demetris Vattis From series: Why not? Iro Kaskani Ring: Why not#5, 2010 Silver oxidized, felt 1.5 x 1.5 x 3 cm Photo by: Demetris Vattis From series: Why not?

Iro Kaskani on Klimt02 - Iro Kaskani Brooch: My colony, 2014 Silver oxidized, cocoons Photo by: Demetris Vattis From series: CoCoon Iro Kaskani Brooch: My colony, 2014 Silver oxidized, cocoons Photo by: Demetris Vattis From series: CoCoon

Iro Kaskani on Klimt02 - Iro Kaskani Necklace: Untitled, 2014 Silver oxidized, cocoons Photo by: Demetris Vattis From series: CoCoonIro Kaskani Necklace: Untitled, 2014 Silver oxidized, cocoons Photo by: Demetris Vattis From series: CoCoon

BELOVED neckpiece !!!!!

Iro Kaskani on Klimt02 - Iro Kaskani Bangle: Happiness’ diary, 2010 Silver, polyester sheet, thread 10 x 10 x 5 cm Photo by: Demetris Vattis From series: You’ve got a messageIro Kaskani Bangle: Happiness’ diary, 2010 Silver, polyester sheet, thread 10 x 10 x 5 cm Photo by: Demetris Vattis From series: You’ve got a message

Iro Kaskani on Klimt02 - Iro Kaskani Brooch: Nobody’s perfect, 2016 Copper oxidized, jesmonite, stainless steel 3 x 0.7 x 9 cm Photo by: Demetris Vattis From series: When I grow up… Iro Kaskani Brooch: Nobody’s perfect, 2016 Copper oxidized, jesmonite, stainless steel 3 x 0.7 x 9 cm Photo by: Demetris Vattis From series: When I grow up…

« Some years ago I used to believe: “my education and experience in architecture is guiding my creativity and my work is mostly determined by the interest to compose fine metals with alternative material and define new forms.”
Later on I concretised my thoughts stating: “Architecture is built environments, planned and designed to function as shelter or vessels of activities and thus it is fostering a physical relationship with the user, inhabitant or viewer. Jewelry takes this physical relationship further into intimacy by the change of scale and placement on the body. Through my work, I find it intriguing to explore ideas of space, scale and absence of symmetry, enabling me to combine precious metals with non-precious elements. Designing jewelry feels like investigating form, structure, and balance to derive a piece of art which will have an intimate physical relationship with the human body and will be completed only when it becomes part of the wearer’s experience and expression. A piece of jewelry is a powerful vehicle for communicating our identity.”
Recently I realized that my curiosity is the most powerful motivating factor behind my work. I’m curious to see things that I visualize becoming facts, to elaborate an idea, to experiment on a certain technique, to see how this or that material is treated, to investigate on however a vision can be a wearable object and yet to see how others perceive my work. »

 

She completed her studies in architecture, at the Università degli studi di Firenze, in 1994. She attended jewellery design courses and received training in goldsmithing, at the Scuola professionale dalla Regione Toscana.
She has worked as an architect until 2007 and also presented three personal exhibitions on contemporary jewellery in Cyprus. She is fully dedicated to studio jewellery since 2008.
She has taught jewellery design at the « Aigaia School of Art and Design » from 2006 to 2013.

 

  The After Joya Effect IV -  18 may-6 june 2017 - Athens at Popeye Loves Olive agllery: The After Joya Effect IV -  18 may-6 june 2017 – Athens at Popeye Loves Olive gallery

2017 EVENTS :
Exhibition  17 May- 05 Jun 2017  The After Joya Effect IV (Athens Jewelry Week 2017).
Exhibition  07 – 17 May 2017  Gioielli in Fermento 2017 Master Collection.
Meeting  04 May 2017 – 04 May 2017  The Dinner: Chef Isa Mazzocchi interprets the jewels of the Master Collection.

Gioielli in Fermento 2017 Master Collection Exhibition  /  07-17 May 2017: 07 – 17 May 2017  Gioielli in Fermento 2017 Master Collection - Torre Fornello (Italy)

 

 

On SALE AT Metmerize Online Shop

 there, what to buy ? for me I would buy this fantastic BRACELET, for its lines, for its shape, for its name !!

Iro Kaskani - "Live in harmony " bracelet - sterling silver, monofilament cord 90X75X15mm (small to medium wrist): Iro Kaskani - « Live in harmony  » bracelet – sterling silver, monofilament cord – 90X75X15mm (small to medium wrist) – belongs to the « the space in between » collection
With the « the space in between » collection I elaborate the idea of creating a void, an empty space. I worked with silver to form cavities and gaps and spaced elements in order to create a void and then, in there, I presented a detailed work of threads

 

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10/03/2017

#MunichJewelleryWeek2017 – EXPO (49) – ‘Utopic Spaces’ – Munich (DE) – 9-13 Mars 2017

Classé dans : Exposition/Exhibition,Noha NICOLESCU (RO),SCHMUCK (DE),Titi BERRIO (Col.) — bijoucontemporain @ 1:46

  (49) Utopic Spaces

 

by Noha Nicolescu (Romania) and Titi Berrio (Colombia)

(49) Utopic Spaces

49 (on map) - utopic spaces - Noha Nicolescu, Ana C. Berrio, Titi Berrio“Utopia is thus the neutral moment of a difference, the space outside of place; it is a gap impossible either to inscribe on a geographic map or to assign to history. Its reality thus belongs to the order of the text; more precisely, it is the figurative representation that the text inscribes beneath its discourse, and by it’’
Louis Marin from Utopiques, jeux d’espace

Titi Berrio. Utopic spacesTiti Berrio.
« Utopic spaces are sites with no real place but they have a general relation of direct or inverted analogy with the real space. »Utopic Spaces /Concept

 Noha Nicolescu - Bijuterie Contemporana.Noha Nicolescu – Bijuterie Contemporana

Titi Berrio. Utopic spacesTiti Berrio« utopic space clearly emerges as a space of transformation, which does not exist in structuring built space but rather in the continual transformation of a space that remains forever flexible: the mind. »Utopic Spaces /Concept

Why would anyone want to design an utopia? There are several reasons. The most important one is that utopian thought is essential to human change in all aspects.
The landscape is the container of our utopia, we transform it and it tries to keep growing between the spontaneity of nature and the human action. As a result of this, the contemporary landscapes are a mixture of dreams, intentions and chance.
Utopic Spaces is a way of materializing through jewellery the meeting of two worlds, two realities and two ways of dreaming, by Romanian artist, Noha Nicolescu, and Colombian artist, Titi Berrio.

Noha Nicolescu - Bijuterie ContemporanaNoha Nicolescu – Bijuterie Contemporana
« We believe in the transformative inner power of the imagination—a change in our inner space will affect external space. »Utopic Spaces /Concept

Noha Nicolescu - The Space Between, ring, wood, sterling silver, acrylic paint,2016, Noha Nicolescu - The Space Between, ring, wood, sterling silver, acrylic paint,2016

Noha Nicolescu - The Gate, pendant, wood, sterling silver, acrylic paint, cotton thread,2016Noha Nicolescu – The Gate, pendant, wood, sterling silver, acrylic paint, cotton thread,2016

Titi Berrio‎ - Utopic SpacesTiti Berrio

 Titi Berrio - Walls, Brooch, steel, sterling silver, felt, acrylic paint, paint, cotton thread, reflective microspheres,2016,Titi Berrio - Walls, Brooch, steel, sterling silver, felt, acrylic paint, paint, cotton thread, reflective microspheres,2016,

Titi Berrio - Cubo, Ring, steel, sterling silver, paint, reflective microspheres,2016, Titi Berrio - Cubo, Ring, steel, sterling silver, paint, reflective microspheres,2016

Titi Berrio - Expansión, necklace, felt, steel, sterling silver, cotton thread, reflective fabric,2015Titi Berrio - Expansión, necklace, felt, steel, sterling silver, cotton thread, reflective fabric,2015

THE PROJECT
The landscape is the container of our utopia, we transform it and it tries to keep growing between the spontaneity of nature and the human action.
As a result of this, the contemporary landscapes are a mixture of dreams, intentions and chance. We put spaces and structures that are filled with experiences, nature, feelings and emotions on a canvas called landscape and we do the same with the jewels that can appropriate the body’s landscape.
Utopic Spaces is a way of materializing through jewelry the meeting of two worlds, two realities and two ways of dreaming. Noha Nicolescu from Romania and Titi Berrio from Colombia appropriated an atelier , a landscape in which a collective dream is built and exposed.

 

References
Lefebvre, H., (2000) Writing on cities. Blackwell Publishers
Foucault, M., (1984) Of Other Spaces: Utopias and Heterotopias, Architecture /Mouvement/ Continuité
Laffoley, P., (2001) Utopic space. The Boston Visionary Cell
Louis Marin from, Utopiques, jeux d’espace

 

 

Häberlstraße 18,
80337 München, Deutschland
Thu-Mon, 12:00-19:00

 

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01/03/2017

#MunichJewelleryWeek2017 – EXPO (58) – « No Expiry » – 3STATIONS, Munich (DE) – 9-12 Mars 2017

(58) No Expiry

Dimitar Stankov &  Jonathan Hens

3STATIONS   Munich

EXCHANGE-BIJOU 1 – Jonathan HENS

(58) No Expiry

ALAFRANGADimitar Stankov seeks a way to depict the sound images emerging in human mind after its interaction with certain sound or traditional Bulgarian folklore music combining craftsmanship and innovative technology. The music represents the traditional manners and it can be used to chase away evil spirits or to bring happiness and joy. This duality inspires him to materialize the sound that can be heard but cannot be felt by touch.NIGHTLIGHT SKIN: Jonathan Hens’ work speaks of recent developments in today’s world, which has seen a fusion between the banal and the subcultures and becomes a place where men and women have merged into androgynous beings. His designs are the result of an intense search for an alternative identity. Rather than a classic example of beauty, the viewer gets to see Hens’ interpretation of it.

No Expiry by Dimitar Stankov and Jonathan Hens

*

"Alafranga" by Dimitar Stankov« Alafranga » by Dimitar Stankov

Jonathan HENS - At "No Expiry", with Dimitar Stankov and Jonathan Hens! 3STATIONS, STUDIO LOFTS Munich Jewelry Week 2017: Jonathan HENS

 

 

3STATIONS Studio Lofts,
Welserstrasse 15,
81373 Munich
09.03-12.03
Thu 15:00-19:00, Fri 10:00-18:00, Sat-Sun 10:00-14:00
(3Stations = 81373 München, Welserstr. 11 / 15 / 23 / 29-31)
 Dimitar Stankov Tel. +32 495327052 / Jonathan Hens Tel. +32 483362484

 

 

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11/11/2016

EXPO ‘INVISIBLE’ – It’s yoga Firenze, Firenze (IT) – 11 Nov. 2016

Classé dans : ALCHIMIA (IT),Exposition/Exhibition,Graduation Show,Italie (IT) — bijoucontemporain @ 0:47

MFA GRADUATION SHOW
Alchimia Contemporary Jewellery School Florence

11 November 2016
Opening: 17:00 – 21:00 at  « It’s yoga Firenze » (Light Lite)
Just as a reminder : The Treasure Hunt/Route will end at 7:30pm given that the shops close at that time. After that, we will meet at the gathering place It’ Yoga (Lightlite) until 9pm !! I hope to see you all at 5:00pm!

INVISIBLE

« INVISIBLE is a series of 213 jewelry pieces created to populate surfaces on the body and beyond.
INVISIBLE is jewelry meant to draw attention, to stop a distracted glance, and be an encounter with the unsuspected.
INVISIBLE talks about a process and a transformation from the ordinary to the extraordinary. It talks about the metamorphosis of organic substances, and focuses on the microorganisms that provoke this metamorphosis by transforming them into jewelry.
Creating “mold” to be worn as jewelry might be felt as a provocation, a provocation to feel and to see what is normally disdained. It is an invitation to accept a natural process of life in its inherent beauty, an invitation to break the boundaries of traditional jewelry, while exploring new possibilities of wearability and reinterpretation.
The exhibition itself is again an invitation to stroll around and explore particular spaces.
It has its starting and ending point in “It’s Yoga” (Light Lite), Via dei Serragli, 24r, 50124 at 5p.m with an installation explaining the project. The exhibition itself evolves as treasure hunt where the visitors will follow a map with a route to find jewelry pieces spread in the area of the city.
This was possible thanks to the collaboration of I Visionari, Coexist, Quelle tre, Wave Parrucchieri, Luca and Bjork. »

Lumy Nouguez – INVISIBLELumy Nouguez – INVISIBLE

Born in 1986 in Bogotá- Colombia, Lumy Nouguez lived and studied in Cúcuta until high school. Later she moved to Medellin for 10 years completing an architecture degree and working as landscape and graphic designer for several years. These became a big influence her work as a jeweler, when in 2014 she came to Florence to pursue her dream of completing a MFA in contemporary jewelry at Alchimia: Contemporary Jewellery School.

 INVISIBLE by Lumy Nouguez - Proliferation series - photos by Lucy Clark. INVISIBLE by Lumy Nouguez – Proliferation series display – photos by Lucy Clark

 

« It’s yoga Firenze »,
Via dei Serragli, 24r,
50124 Firenze – ITALIA

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31/10/2016

EXCHANGE-BIJOU 1 – Linda EZERMAN – How I fell in love with shrimps ….

Classé dans : COUP DE COEUR,EXCHANGE-BIJOU,Hollande (NL),Linda EZERMAN (NL),www Klimt02 — bijoucontemporain @ 23:19

Linda EZERMAN

Contemporary jeweller Linda Ezerman lives and works in Wormerveer, The Netherlands.  Ezerman has a diverse educational background embrassing areas such as Sculpting, Cultural Management and Communication. Her jewellery plays with the paradoxical feelings her surroudings (the woods and the sea) can invoke, as well as the menaning of their history. 

« « In my jewellery I combine non-precious and precious materials. The creation process of my work is lengthy; it takes me many days, if not weeks, to complete a piece of jewellery. I work in an organic manner and combine unusual and unique materials. The result is tactile and wearable light-weight jewellery. Recognise the original materials in my jewellery may require a second or even a third close look.
My jewellery echoes the sea, contemporary and striking. Each piece is handmade and unique. »
 »

 I admired her beach serie, sea seeds, corals & algea jewels ….. This year we got SHRIMPS ! ALL very wearable, VERY desirable shrimps !

Linda Ezerman - Shrimps 2016 - Neckpiece, unique piece Materials: silver, silicone, ink Linda Ezerman - Shrimps 2016 – Neckpiece, unique piece Materials: silver, silicone, ink

Linda Ezerman - Neckpiece from the series Shrimps Materials: silver, paint, silicone, pigment: Linda Ezerman - Neckpiece from the series Shrimps Materials: silver, paint, silicone, pigment

Linda Ezerman  Necklace: Shrimp, 2015  Silver, silicone, ink  Photo by: Linda Ezerman  From series: Shrimps: Linda Ezerman  Necklace: Shrimp, 2015  Silver, silicone, ink  Photo by: Linda Ezerman  From series: Shrimps

Linda Ezerman Neckpiece: Shrimp, 2015 Silver, silicone, ink Photo by: Linda Ezerman From serie: ShrimpsLinda Ezerman - Neckpiece: Shrimp, 2015 – Silver, silicone, ink – Photo by: Linda Ezerman -From serie: Shrimps

« In my jewellery I express how I experience the outside world. I am fascinated by the surroundings I find myself in and what these surroundings invokes in me: paradoxical feelings of freedom, security and imminent danger.
A walk in the woods, for example, invokes a feeling of freedom, yet the woods also make me feel slightly ill at ease: there always seems to be lurking something in the shadows.
With the sea I also maintain a paradoxical relationship. There is space and unfamiliar life, which I find both fascinating and frightening because of its incomprehensible infinity.
Moreover, the history of my surroundings create meaning. Century-old remnants of industrial life have made this landscape into what it is today and shaped the people who live here into who and what they are.
The materials I work with originate from my surroundings: felt, wood, silver and copper, mixed with polymer clay, silicone and paint. My work is wearable, which allows it to offer security or protection from that which is so intangible and yet so impressive: the surroundings in which you find yourself. »  Linda Ezerman

 Linda Ezerman Brooch: Shrimp, 2015 Silver, silicone, ink: Linda Ezerman Brooch: Shrimp, 2015 Silver, silicone, ink

 

Had several workshops/workclasses in felt jewelry, polymer clay ‘at Dutch Polymer Guild), goldsmithing
Exhibited in 2016 at « Más que Zuecos y Tulipanes./Més que esclops i tulipes« 

 

She will e at SIERAAD 2016 – Amsterdam – 10-13 Nov. 2016

SIERAAD Art Fair 2016 - Amsterdam - 10-13 Nov. 2016

  LINDA EZERMAN Dutch linda@ezerman.nl www.lezerman.com  stand 52bLINDA EZERMAN  Dutch  linda@ezerman.nl  www.lezerman.com  stand 52b

02/02/2016

EXPO ‘Més que esclops i tulipes / Meer dan klompen en tulpen’ – Gal. CONTEXT, Barcelona (ES) – 18 Fevr.-31 Mars 2016

CONTEXT Nova exposició- new exhibition at Context Galeria

MORE THAN CLOGS AND TULIPS / MEER DAN KLOMPEN EN TULPEN

Més que esclops i tulipes / Meer dan klompen en tulpen

Joieria Contemporània Holandesa
Show curated by Luis Acosta, textile designer and jewelry paper.

inauguració -opening 18/02/16, 19,30 h.

    Context Galeria -

 Creativity that  twenty jewelry designers Netherlands manifested in « More than clogs and tulips » exhibition being sometimes serious, sometimes playful.
Each piece reveals the diversity of shapes and materials chosen. In some cases it has evolved to manifest as sculpture to be carried, worn and enhance the beauty of those who wear.

 

 Participants:  Ina HascherMichela MazzeoKarin KortenhorstBirgit LakenLinda EzermanGemma FrowijnMaja HoutmanMiriam VerbeekCharlotte MolenaarArianne Van der GaagIris WeyerSylvia Blickman Eva Van Kempen Margo NelissenDieuwke RaatsMachteld Van Joolingen –  Jacquelien SluisFrancisca HennemanJeanet Metselaar –  Marjo Van den Bekerom

 Charlotte Molenaar -Necklace "Tulip Mania" - felted wool whith silk fibers -  500,00€: Charlotte Molenaar -Necklace « Tulip Mania » – felted wool whith silk fibers

  Jeanet Metselaar - Bracelet "Blue" - imitation leather -   Unique piece -   135,00€: Jeanet Metselaar - Bracelet « Blue » – imitation leather

Linda Ezerman -  Necklace "Shrimps"- silver, blackened, pigments, silicone, glasbeads - -195,00€: Linda Ezerman -  Necklace « Shrimps » (detail) – silver, blackened, pigments, silicone, glas beads

Francisca Henneman - Necklace "Silicante" - silicone - 195,00€: Francisca Henneman - Necklace « Silicante » – silicone

Ina Hascher - Bracelet "Geometric 2" -   Geometric beadwork bracelet   - 360,00€: Ina Hascher - Bracelet « Geometric 2″ -   Geometric beadwork bracelet

Maja Houtman - Brooch "Black Ton" - silver, onyx beads - 450,00€: Maja Houtman – Brooch « Black Ton » – silver, onyx beads

Margo Nelissen - Necklace "Calebashes" - gold 18, silver, yellow diamands -  1200,00€: Margo Nelissen – Necklace « Calebashes » – gold 18, silver, yellow diamands

Machteld Van Joolingen - Brooch "Dreams" - steel, silver, veneer, paint - 1300,00€: Machteld Van Joolingen – Brooch « Dreams » – steel, silver, veneer, paint

 Sylvia Blickman -  Brooch "Crosspollination"- anodised aluminium, silver - 475,00€: Sylvia Blickman -  Brooch « Crosspollination »- anodised aluminium, silver

Karin Kortenhorst - Necklace "Always new 1" - metal wire, teflon tape-wrap -  980,00€: Karin Kortenhorst - Necklace « Always new 1″ – metal wire, teflon tape-wrap

and ….. PSSSST !! …… ALL can be shopped online at CONTEXT Gallery, here !!!

 

CONTEXT Galeria 
c. Viñolas, 8-10
Sant Cugat del Vallès (BCN)
Tel  935 893 806
galeria@context.cat

 

 

25/01/2016

Selection 4 SCHMUCK 2016 : Kadri Mälk

Classé dans : blog ArtJewelryForum,COUP DE COEUR,Estonie (EE),Kadri MALK (EE),SCHMUCK (DE) — bijoucontemporain @ 0:12

Kadri Mälk,  BLACK BEAUTY

Congrats to all the artists who made the SCHMUCK 2016 list, on show at the Handwerksmesse during #munichjewelleryweek  24/02–1/03/2016

Congrats to all the artists who made the SCHMUCK 2016 list, on show at the Handwerksmesse during #munichjewelleryweek / #jewellery #brooch by Kadri Mälk     brooch by Kadri Mälk

Kadri Mälk  Brooch: Very Guilty 2010  Siberian jet, black rhodium plated white gold, spinel, tourmalines  11.5 x 6.6 x 1.2 cm: Kadri Mälk  Brooches : « Very Guilty » & « Guilty » 2010  Siberian jet, black rhodium plated white gold, spinel, tourmalines  11.5 x 6.6 x 1.2 cm

interview :« Kadri Mälk – Love Me Or Leave Me Or Let Me Be Lonely »
By Aaron Patrick Decker (THANKS to AJF)

I ascended old stairs to a cozy apartment in Tallinn, Estonia, where I had the pleasure of interviewing the renowned Estonian jeweler Kadri Mälk. As the head of the metals department in the Estonian Academy of Arts, she shines a spotlight on younger Estonian jewelers. She has given rise to a generation whose work is strong, individual, and definitely Estonian. Mälk’s work is dark, poetic, and wholly of her own voice. Utilizing such traditional jewelry materials as gold, silver, gemstones, and jet, she creates a recipe whose melancholy fragrances permeate through all her work. 
Aaron Patrick Decker: How did you come to jewelry?
Kadri Mälk: Initially I studied painting for four years and really enjoyed it. Before that, I worked in a publishing house. After studying painting, I suddenly felt that maybe it wasn’t for me, maybe I needed something more intimate. After that I went to the Academy to study jewelry. I was either 28 or 29 when I graduated. I felt somehow that I was late, an autumn flower. I remained a freelance artist and was on my own for about nine years; meanwhile I was invited to teach. Initially it was just a small workload, like once a week. I enjoyed staying in my atelier and working on my own schedule and freedom. I liked it so much, no due dates and a kind of wild life, a lifestyle I still really appreciate.
After graduation I began some studies in stonework. First in St. Petersburg in a stone-cutting factory, a huge factory that received quite high-quality raw materials from Siberia. Then I studied gemology in Finland at the Lahti Design Institute for two years. I was offered to prolong my studies in London in 1993–94 and receive the highest degree one could get in gemological studies. During that time in Estonia, there was no one in the field of gemology. It’s a small field in general, but in Estonia, no one had this sort of certification.
But then my professor, Kuldkepp, fell ill and couldn’t return to the department anymore. Until this point I had worked alone. Leading a department is not just about being an ideological leader, there are other concerns about finances, and finding a team that works. You have to find people who fit together. I had no experience in this work so I was very afraid of the proposal to take the department. And especially since I was offered the gemological certification, which was seductive.
Simultaneously, I got a chance to work in Germany. I was young, bold, and at that time ready to jump. I applied to Bernd Munsteiner’s studio. He rejected me at first, saying he had too much work to also teach an apprentice. Somehow he changed his mind and decided to bring me in. They were intrigued by Estonia, the wild northern forest, so they said okay. He was concerned about my age and the time allotted; to learn stone cutting and faceting requires a large amount of time. I went in there not being able to speak German, and they had a certain dialect. I had some stone-cutting experience from St. Petersburg, but not at the level at which his workshop operated. It was very generous of him to take me.
We began at 7 a.m. and the first break was at 10:30 for some coffee. It was very tight and regimented. Funnily, during lunch they turned off the power in the shop; I thought I could work more during this time, but it was not allowed. He didn’t believe in the beginning that I could learn facet cutting, but at the end he was happy with where I got. I remember having a notebook and just trying to write down everything during lunchtime. I wouldn’t eat. I’d just write what the workers were saying. The old knowledge. It was my passion, stones.
You have said you were close with your professor; can you talk about your decision to take over the department?
Kadri Mälk: She was the reason I decided to take over the department. It was kind of fatal serendipity—as I saw it then, but not anymore. I had to do it because she could not. She was an extraordinary personality in the time and circumstances, she did not fit the environment, didn’t fit the times. If you read her writings, you could tell she had such a drive sourced from somewhere else. She had such a mission to pass on things to people, not in a direct way but in an indirect and metaphoric way. Her teaching methods were not pedagogical at all, she was often much more abstract. She locked the students in the room and said, “Just work.” All should be concentration, creativity driven to the work. No cinema, no theater, no magazines, no outside information, and it should all come from yourself, come through you. Extreme methods, but very effective. She wanted you to achieve the maximum. She was not very communicative, didn’t go anywhere, didn’t move around, her efforts were very concentrated on certain students. I can’t find the right words to completely describe her, but she wanted students to open up by closing off.
Do you think becoming a professor so early shaped you as an artist and continues to shape you?
Kadri Mälk: I was a baby professor. I was elected when I was 37. I had already been a renowned artist for some time, but as an educator, administrator, or team member, I had no experience. Looking back, I realize now the trust from admin and colleagues when I took over the department. My creative past supported me and proved to them I could survive in the school. Just recently somebody outside of the academy, and artists, came to me and said, “Now, Kadri, I realize you have done it well…” In the beginning, others were hesitant because I was seemingly unsuitable for the job. The highest hesitations came from me. I was unsure if I could rise to the occasion. And when the women came, 15 years later, it was some confirmation.
I just liked to make my pieces. And it’s so funny, I still go about my work in a similar way. Nowadays students are much more oriented by a schedule and thinking about making work for exhibition. Deadlines. My satisfaction came from my pieces, from the process. I liked how they came to me, how they happened. When I was in school, learning about the art field was not included. The professor tried to keep this off us, all these associations, how this works, etc. I remember asking her what happens when I graduate. She didn’t tell me anything about the real life of artists. It was all about the work. It was a conscious decision to keep the art world away from us.

Kadri Mälk  necklace "Amnesia" 2010  - ebony, tourmaline, silver, - photo Tanel VeenreKadri Mälk  necklace « Amnesia » 2010  – ebony, tourmaline, silver, – photo Tanel Veenre

Kadri Mälk - "Mid-day of life" 2008 brooch - jet, silver, almandine, smoky quartz - photo Tanel Veenre: Kadri Mälk – « Mid-day of life » 2008 brooch – jet, silver, almandine, smoky quartz – photo Tanel Veenre

Do you think your work changed during this period?
Kadri Mälk: No, not because of the Academy. The majority of my time went into the Academy, but this didn’t affect my work. In the first years, we gave assignments to students in the form of certain themes. Later on, especially at the MA level, where the study is more conceptual, they must meet their choices themselves to reinforce their spiritual identities.
Someone asked me, “What do you like best about teaching?” I feel lucky that I have the possibility to notice and follow how personalities develop and begin to blossom; how new talented personalities emerge in a creative surrounding; and how they act and react. And how passionate they may be in their work! It’s the achievement of every member of our staff.
Not much changed about me, either. Of course I had to modify my talking towards topics, concentrate, and learn to convey or see the methods that worked best, but at the core I didn’t change.
It’s very different to be just a teacher rather than the department leader. You are responsible for all that happens. The biggest difference is that the academy and the students are number one, followed by your work and your family. The academy and the students are number one. They can call me at any time if they need. I feel better in this. They know that they can come, they are not lost.
I think that’s quite admirable. I haven’t heard of another professor so invested in the program in the ways you are. What do you think some of the most important things to pass on to your students are, what do you hope they take away from you and the Academy?
Kadri Mälk: A kind of attitude, that you should believe in yourself. People shouldn’t take you off your path. Younger artists are vulnerable, in a condition to be shaped or reshaped; it’s important to tell them or convince them that whatever happens you should turn that attention in to yourself, otherwise you get lost. If you take into consideration all the opinions you hear, you get lost; there is so much noise. You don’t know where to look or where to go. You don’t orient yourself any longer in the world. Believe in yourself … it’s hard to when you’re young. Believe and be strong in your core.
Then your core begins to fortify?
Kadri Mälk: Yes, it becomes stronger. It crystalizes, the elements that are more important, the ones that are harder, take shape, and the rest falls apart. It comes with time, you shouldn’t force or exaggerate. You have to be patient.
There are so many conferences, so many books asking the big question—is jewelry art? It’s not my task to answer it.
My comment to it is very simple: love me or leave me or let me be lonely. 
Or to put it differently: take it or leave it or let me be lonely.
What do I mean with that? It’s very simple. There is always another way out. It’s not only taking or leaving. There is another possibility which is hardly seen. You just have to be patient and look carefully.
Also, the creative process has confusion, has crisis. You should not be afraid of these things, they are natural. Fear that your next work will fail is so very normal. Crisis is normal in art making. Art is always about starting again in hesitation.
What are your impressions of younger jewelers now coming into the field, at large and in Estonia?
Kadri Mälk: (long pause) It is very hard to generalize, even here the local scene is quite diverse. You can se
more design-oriented work, more personal work. I try to encourage these people who are afraid of having somehow veiled, personal, or exceptional ways of expressing. If they compare themselves to what is happening in different places with people their age, they begin unconsciously to bring other aesthetics into their own work. I want to encourage people who are different, who are slightly insecure.
Francis Bacon said, if you are going to decide to be an artist, you have got to decide that you are not going to be afraid to make a fool of yourself.
Making art is so simple—all you have to do is to wait quietly, staring at a blank wall until the drops of blood appear on your forehead. Be aware that criticism always comes along with creative work. If you can’t handle it, you have to quit.
How frequently and easily success transforms into depression! You can avoid it by leaving some loose threads in your work, some unresolved part that carries you forward in your new work. What you need to know in your next piece is silently present in your last. You can find it while looking in patience. It’s like a seed crystal for your next destination.
I am not really analytical like most. I am interested mostly in my unconscious choices, what I like and what triggers me.
If someone were to ask about your work, how would you describe it to them?
Kadri Mälk: Look at the originals. You should look at the original pieces and see for yourself.
Do you think that is an important idea, to see things in person?
Kadri Mälk: Yes. We are so much in the age of reproduction. We see the screen or the page with the picture. We don’t look at the original anymore, we don’t feel the tactility of the pieces or taste the iron. It is very harmful to humankind to go about it in this manner. Go to the originals. Otherwise it is so meta-meta, you don’t feel, you don’t know the scale, the details, or the material from the copies.
What are some of the things that inspire you?
Kadri Mälk: I don’t know what inspiration is exactly. Sometimes things are more intense and sometimes less intense. Sometimes I feel that I can capture things, forms, colors, something in the air, and sometimes I feel like sand is running through my fingers.
Consciously I cannot, but it comes more from my subconscious. There’s some differentiation between mental and physical subconscious. One is staying here (Mälk points to her head) and one is here (she points to her stomach), the first is mental and then the second is more gut, subconscious. The feelings are very different. Or maybe the frequencies are different. I like life in all its expressions, that’s my source
In talking about those two polar ways—analytical and emotional—in your work, do you bring them together, is there one that’s more important to you?
Kadri Mälk: Usually it’s subconscious, these decisions you make. They are made before they are at your conscious level. You made the decisions in a big fog. Just as in crystallization, they come into being. And when they are there, it is your choice to call them either consciously made or born out of the sky.
Looking at your work, there is a quality of instantaneous moment; going deeper, you find more and more. The work is quite striking and emotionally charged. Seems very palpable, like it has a heartbeat. There is also a melancholy quality to many of your pieces. Is that a conscious decision or a more subconscious one?
Kadri Mälk: A tiger cannot avoid his stripes! (She laughs.)
That’s a great analogy. 
Kadri Mälk: I am very shy describing my work. I am afraid I cannot reach the truth through verbalization.
There is this quality of Estonian jewelers, not a reluctance, but an ability to keep the integrity of the work. It’s hard to describe the work prescriptively in its conceptual and formal functions, often it acts like poetry, it speaks with power but is not completely resolute. What is your opinion of this attitude?
Kadri Mälk: When I think of my jewelry, it’s easier to describe it. “It’s blue, violet, black, and purple. There is fog, there are shades of magenta.” You can be precise without being clear. And unclear may also be precise. It’s very much an oxymoron.

Kadri Mälk, Downcast Face, 2013, brooch, black rhodium-plated white gold, black baroque pearl, black diamonds, black diamond dust, 120 x 72 x 12 mm, artist’s collection, photo: Tiit RammulKadri Mälk, Downcast Face, 2013, brooch, black rhodium-plated white gold, black baroque pearl, black diamonds, black diamond dust, 120 x 72 x 12 mm, artist’s collection, photo: Tiit Rammul

Being precise but unclear, can you talk more about this notion?
Kadri Mälk: It’s really a sort of hologram, like a puzzle. As a notion and phenomenon, I think it’s possible. 
It is an interesting facet of Estonian jewelry. Sort of irresolute.
Kadri Mälk: Yeah, it’s in a stage of becoming. Being on the way.
Yeah, it’s not negative, its more open. 
Kadri Mälk: Yes, an ambivalence. 
Is there something that you want people to get from your work?
Kadri Mälk: To share the unsharable. What often happens is that the viewer approaches in a superficial way, which is natural. On the foreground they see materials, especially if there are unusual materials.
I’ve used a lot of moleskin in my work and it’s taken a kind of attraction or peculiarity in my work. I don’t feel a need to explain the choices I’ve made. How it came to me, it was just an incident. Or a happy accident.
When all my stuff was stolen from my atelier, I found a coat of my grandmother’s from the war, made out of moleskin. I took it apart, slices of extremely thin, like silk, soft silk paper like. Then I saw these pieces. The tenderness at first, the sensuality of the material, and that the fur grew in only one direction. It was so thin, the fur. It had such a strong character, though. I started to work with this, used it a lot, the coat is now gone into all the pieces. I also think the animal is present in the work. The mole, he’s blind, he doesn’t have sight but has extreme animal spirit. All this orientation in time and space. I studied how they moved, their lives, did more research. How they were trapped and caught. This animalism was powerful and important for me in these works. But you aren’t going to retell the story. If you put it into a story, it’s banal. 
Can you talk more about the jet in your work?
Kadri Mälk: When I carve it, like timber or wood, it has nerves like a human body. The stones have structure, they direct you. They tell you where to go. You should go there and you shouldn’t make the wrong decision. There is a negotiation with the stone when I cut it. Jet is mute, silencium. Only a big dust is coming. Your lungs are filled with jet powder. Like stones are directing you in advance, there are inclusions, by heat they will crack more. Jet is completely mute. This is what fascinates me. It’s not much used in jewelry anymore. 
I lack the habit and custom and will to interpret my works after they have been completed. The work either tells you something or it doesn’t. Once you have completed it, then keep quiet. The work must know whether it radiates or not. The piece of jewelry in your mind, in your imagination, is always correct and beautiful. Resistance starts when you try to convert it into material. Oh, la la! Materials are like elementary particles—charged, heavily charged sometimes, but indifferent. They don’t tell you much, you have to tell them the truth.
You have staged events and produced a number of books—JUST MUST, Castle in the Air, etc.—about Estonian jewelry and jewelers. You have made the work coming from the Academy available to a much larger audience. Give us your thoughts about publishing these books and what your intentions were at the time you did them.
Kadri Mälk: Firstly, I love books. I love their smell and the shade of the voice when you turn the page and then unexpectedly see a new image … It’s both emotional and intellectual. Since 1989 I have published twenty-something publications, some of them out-of-print already. The first ones were really ugly ducklings, black-and-white … I’ve strived always to tell something different with them, it has been my passion. Indeed, they have been acting as ambassadors of Estonian jewelry in the world, although it was not intended. So many students coming from abroad have said the pull came from the books. Strange! Usually nowadays the urge comes from the Internet. 
To make an impression abroad is not as important as to make an impression in your own soul.
Thank you.

 Kadri Mälk - "Fresh, dried, only young" 2001 brooch - sarcodon imbricatus (mushroom), silver, almandines: Kadri Mälk – « Fresh, dried, only young » 2001 brooch – sarcodon imbricatus (mushroom), silver, almandines

Kadri Mälk, Medusa IV – ehisnõel (oksüdeeritud hõbe, kumm). coop.artun.ee/nope5/: Kadri Mälk, Medusa IV – ehisnõel (oksüdeeritud hõbe, kumm)

24/01/2016

Selection 4 SCHMUCK 2016 : Henriette Schuster

Classé dans : Allemagne (DE),COUP DE COEUR,Henriette SCHUSTER (DE),SCHMUCK (DE) — bijoucontemporain @ 18:51

Sur le FIL du bijou, avec Henriette Schuster (Germany)

Congrats to all the artists who made the SCHMUCK 2016 list, on show at the Handwerksmesse  during #munichjewelleryweek  24/02–1/03/2016

Working with silver and thread, Henriette’s jewellery is arrestingly simple and direct: small elements, often in pairs, sit in delicate balance with one another, a subtle dance of interdependence and connection.

Henriette Schuster http://www.henrietteschuster.com/c.php: Henriette Schuster

« Almost Invisible » : « Henriette Schuster is a quiet jeweler, and the title of her show at Gallery Funaki Almost Invisible is perfect. She makes simple pieces with delicate domestic references or pure abstractions. There is nothing big or boisterous about her or her work. It is just humble, quiet poetry.
Susan Cummins: Henriette, what is your story? What compelled you to become a jeweler, and what was your path to learning how to do it?
Henriette Schuster: I have known I wanted to be jeweler since the age of six or seven. My grandfather built pianos, and I used to watch him at work when he handmade the keys using ivory, ebony, felt, bone, glue, and shellac. He didn’t say much, but one day he handed me a pair of his working pliers and a piece of wire. It was here that I began making jewelry.
I went against my parents’ wishes by dropping out of my studies in architecture and following the recommendation of Hermann Jünger to take up training in gold- and silversmithing at the renowned Neugablonz Fachschule für Glas und Schmuck (Neugablonz College for Glass and Jewelry). After completing my degree, I was accepted into the Academy of Fine Arts in Munich as one of Otto Künzli’s first students in 1991. I graduated in 2000. Simultaneously, I have worked in my own studio in Munich since 1988.
Can you talk about what you took away from your studies at the Academy in Munich? Are you still connected to a strong community of jewelers  who studied there? Do you work on jewelry projects together? What is a recent example?
Henriette Schuster: My training in Neugablonz had provided me with the skills to be a gold- and silversmith. That training is not a requirement but a good basis for further studies at the Academy. Entering the Academy meant leaving behind the safe terrain of the trade, even the jewelry, and facing the adventure of becoming an artist.
Artists are often envied for their freedom to do what they please, to think and work freely, but dealing with this kind of freedom is quite a challenge, and I realized this very quickly. To me, it means: paying attention to every detail; taking work and looking at it from another perspective or from upside down; always starting again, and not giving up but knowing when to give up; and taking time to find your own dialogue with your work, believing in it, and always double-checking. Find and hide. See and be seen. Fear and be brave.
For the past 13 years, I have worked in my small studio where I also have a gallery space. Here, I exhibit the works of other artists, not always jewelry artists. It is here, during the Schmuck fair in Munich, that I am able to reach an international public and to invite colleagues such as Lisa Walker, Karl Fritsch, Helen Britton, David Bielander, Volker Atrops, and most recently Doris Betz.
What leads you to pick the objects you include in your jewelry, such as balloons, cups, and mittens? Have you begun doing more abstracted shapes recently? Why? Does jewelry reflect the nature of the person who made it? Does yours? How?
Henriette Schuster: My work has always had a personal reference. I find metaphors for my memories, experiences, observations, difficulties, hopes, and dreams. I’m interested in the relationship (co-existence) of two elements and the balance they strike, how they move and fit together. I also apply these considerations to abstract geometrical forms. The abstract form allows a more spontaneous and playful way of working. These two themes have been the basis of my work ever since my studies.
Your jewelry is almost invisible. These days, the big and ambitious seems to steal the limelight, so why do you persist in doing things that don’t draw attention?
Henriette Schuster: When I hear this question, I remember that as a child I used to play the piano in the basement, hoping that someone would hear me….
Almost Invisible is what I called my drawings, and Katie Scott suggested that this should be the title of my exhibition at Gallery Funaki. I look upon the large stage from a distance, and at times I’m jealous, but it drives me crazy and exhausts me to take part in a big performance. And I can wait. I love working on my own. This is probably not a wise career choice, and some people even think I’m arrogant. But I feel nervous when people from all over the world who know my work come to visit. Last year, a visitor commented, “I love your work. It’s so humble.” This really touched me. » (THANKS to AJF)

 Henriette Schuster - Handschuhe - Silber 925 - 2011Henriette Schuster – Mittens – blackened silver 925, elastic – 2011

Henriette Schuster Pendant: Teacups, 2013 Blackened silver, elastic: Henriette Schuster – Pendant: Teacups, 2013 Blackened silver, elastic

Henriette Schuster - Haus - Gold 750-  2004Henriette Schuster - Haus – Gold 750-  2004

Henriette Schuster - plug - Silber 925 - 2005Henriette Schuster – plug – Silber 925 – 2005

Henriette Schuster - Arme - Silber 925 - 2003Henriette Schuster – Arme – Silber 925 – 2003

Henriette Schuster - wheels - 2010 - pendant - blackened silver, elasticHenriette Schuster – wheels – 2010 – pendant – blackened silver, elastic

Henriette Schuster - Scheiben - Silber 925 - 2010Henriette Schuster – Scheiben – Silber 925 – 2010

Henriette Schuster - Minute und Stunde - Silber 925Henriette Schuster – Minute und Stunde – Silber 925

Henriette Schuster - Räder - Silber 925 - 2010Henriette Schuster - Räder – Silber 925 – 2010

Henriette Schuster - "plug" 2005 - blackened silver, elasticHenriette Schuster - « plug » 2005 – blackened silver, elastic

 Henriette Schuster Pendant: Bell 2013 Blackened silver, elastic: Henriette Schuster Pendant: Bell 2013 Blackened silver, elastic 

 

 

23/12/2015

EXPO/CONCOURS ‘Filo Rosso 2015′ … & the WINNER is …. – Sala Negrisin & Museo Carà, Muggia (IT) / DRAT Gallery & Palazzo del Podestà, Izola (Slovenia) – 12 Dec.2015 – 24 Janv.2016

FILO ROSSO 2015

Le realizzazioni selezionate dalla giuria saranno esposte assieme ai bozzetti presso il Museo d’Arte Moderna «Ugo Carà» o presso la Sala Comunaled’Arte «Giuseppe Negrisin» di Muggia, Trieste (Italia) dal 12 dicembre 2015 al 24 gennaio 2015
e nel mese di maggio 2016 presso il «Palazzo del Prefetto» o  la Galleria Drat a IZOLA  (Slovenia) 

11 Dec. : 17.30 Inaugurazione  MUGGIA (Ts – Italia) – Museo  d’Arte Moderna «Ugo Carà»
11 Dec. :  19.30 Inaugurazione/Otvoritev  IZOLA (Slovenia) Galerija «Drat»

Quest’anno viene inoltre presentato ilcoup de coeur”: mostra -mostre- dedicata a Silvia Beccaria (Izola) e a Vered Babai (Muggia), artista israeliana che espone per la prima volta in Italia.

Filo Rosso 2015:

The WINNER of FiloRosso 2015 is Alix Tran and her poetic necklace !!

 Alix_Tran_Premio_Filo_Rosso Alix TranCol Claudine, 22x20cm, necklace, linen and brass, 2015.
« Col Claudine (Peter Pan collar), is the contrast between a chaste and white collar, detached from the garment’s body, and the invasion of small precious flies.Flies concentrated on areas of cracks in the tissue, like wounds. Aggregated on a soft material, and loose like a net, that takes them to the trap. They become companion insects. Like a Memento mori. »

Prix FiloRossoPrix FiloRosso  – transmis du dernier gagnant, il sera transmis au prochain gagnant …. fil rouge de la création bijou !

  jury - Ruiz_prada_LeMignot_Babai_gassier_micerale jury ! deg à dr : Agatha Ruiz de la Prada, Jean Yves Le Mignot, Vered Badai, Marianne Gassier, Giovanni Micera

 

Non primés mais remarqués, les bijoux suivants :

  Biljana Klekackoska (Macedonia) brooch 'the letter' seta, argento, acciaio, colore: Biljana Klekackoska (Macedonia) – « The Letter » BROOCH
Techniques: filigree, drawing/writing and aquarelle on silk with iron-fixing silk colors, sowing, oxidization
Materials: silver (925 and fine), silk, steel – Dimensions: 9.6 cm. x 7cm. x 1cm.
« This piece is part of the exploration series wearable memories. This is a “never sent love letter”. It contains everything unsaid to a lover, but worn inside. Now it appeared in a material form, ready to be seen and worn outside. »

 Noga Harel - Israel Title : Oceanic bloom NECKLACE Techniques: felting, sewing, reconstructing and assembling. Materials: wool, corals, pearls, crystals, thread, fabric, garlic flowers. Dimensions : 41 cm. x 24 cm. - Depth : 11 cm.: Noga Harel – Israel – « Oceanic bloom » NECKLACE Techniques: felting, sewing, reconstructing and assembling. Materials: wool, corals, pearls, crystals, thread, fabric, garlic flowers. Dimensions : 41 cm. x 24 cm. – Depth : 11 cm.
« The work  » Oceanic bloom » deals with the artist’s ability to present simultaneously different characters. In this work I wanted to investigate the wonderful world of the plants.
The result will always be based on reality but full of the inner emotional world of the creator…And at the unique personal perspective… « 

Noga Harel (IL)  - photo M.Gassier - - Oceanic bloom" NECKLACE Techniques: felting, sewing, reconstructing and assembling. Materials: wool, corals, pearls, crystals, thread, fabric, garlic flowers. Dimensions : 41 cm. x 24 cm. - Depth : 11 cm.: Noga Harel (IL) (detail) - photo M.Gassier - - Oceanic bloom" NECKLACE Techniques: felting, sewing, reconstructing and assembling. Materials: wool, corals, pearls, crystals, thread, fabric, garlic flowers. Dimensions : 41 cm. x 24 cm. - Depth : 11 cm.:

Noga Harel - Israel – « Oceanic bloom » NECKLACE (details)

Heidemarie Herb Germany Title: Schluesselkinder - collection time PENDANT Materials: fabric, silver, mix media, pigment Dimensions: 12 cm. x 8 cm. Techniques: textile impregnated in plaster, colorured with pigmentHeidemarie Herb  – Germany – « Schluesselkinder » – collection time PENDANT
Materials: fabric, silver, mix media, pigment – Dimensions: 12 cm. x 8 cm.
Techniques: textile impregnated in plaster, colorured with pigment
« My work is the expression of the pain of their children that they must often live with greater responsibility of them. A reality of the daily life. » Potographer: Silvana Tili

Muggia Museo U Carà - FiloRosso 2015-  Heidemarie Herb: Heidemarie Herb

 Aleksandra Atanasovski, Slovenija -   me(n)talna neznost RING Materials: silver and gold, red silk. Dimensions: 2.5x1 cm and 25x25 cm red silk Techniques: inprint of finger tip, casting in silver.:  Aleksandra Atanasovski, Slovenija -   « me(n)talna neznost » RING – Materials: silver and gold, red silk. Dimensions: 2.5×1 cm and 25×25 cm red silk Techniques: inprint of finger tip, casting in silver.
« I was oserving the space beetwen a thought and action, how the softnes (of silk) can be tuched, perceved by finger, and how this finger can become metalic in a fraction of a second. »

Sigal MeshorerSigal Meshorer – Israel – « Missing Embroidery » RING
Materials: Silver 925, White Linen. Dimensions: W-54mm. H-32-42mm.
« The work consists of 2 identical rings.
One with flat white linen fabric, the other with domed white linen.
The fabric sits on a circle on top of the ring, an outer ring holds it in place by pressure.
The fabric imitates either a white stone or a miniature embroidery hoop. »

Et, j’ajouterai, quelques coups de coeur personnels :

Flavia Michelutti - Muggia Museo U Carà - FiloRosso- : Flavia Michelutti – collana con ciondolo « aperto »

 Flavia Michelutti (chiuso): Flavia Michelutti - collana con ciondolo « chiuso »

  broche de Martina Obid Mlakar (front) - FiloRosso 2015broche « La pelle della mia vita » de Martina Obid Mlakar (front)

 -  broche "La pelle della mia vita" de Martina Obid Mlakar (back) - FiloRosso 2015broche « La pelle della mia vita » (« Pores of my life ») de Martina Obid Mlakar (back)

Yasmin Vinograd - Muggia Museo U Carà - FiloRosso 2015- Yasmin Vinograd  « The Wave » necklace / silver,silkwork  

Galit Einav (detail)Galit Einav necklace (detail)

Jure Kodre ring - FiloRosso 2015: Jure Kodre ring « In memory » – with a « filo rosso » work in the inside of the ring ….

Jure Kodre ring - FiloRosso 2015: Jure Kodre ring « In memory »

Huberto Široka (croix de vie) - Muggia Museo U Carà - FiloRosso 2015-  :  Huberto Široka (back):

Huberto Široka (croix de vie – entre croix et sexe ….) (front & back)

 Daniela Luzzu with the necklace "Radici" - tribute to Frida Kahlo: Daniela Luzzu (IT) with the necklace « Radici » – tribute to Frida Kahlo

 collier di "BONATI2" (NELLY E PATRIZIA Bonati) collier di « BONATI2 » (Nelly & Patrizia Bonati)

Muggia - Sala Negrisin - collier di BONATI2 NELLY E PATRIZIA: Muggia - Sala Negrisin - collier di BONATI2 NELLY E PATRIZIA:

collier di « BONATI2 » (Nelly & Patrizia Bonati) (detagli)

 Sandra Kocjancic,  detail Sandra Kocjancic,  detail

Pour cette édition de FiloRosso il y a plus de 80 artistes inscrits de toutes nationalités confondues: Italie, France, Slovènie, Croatie, Autriche…Etats-Unis, Israel … Quelques noms: Sebastien CarréGigi Mariani, Barbara Uderzo, Lucilla Giovanninetti (Eandare) , etc …… et de très jeunes artistes encore peu connus du public :

avec (liste non certifiée !)  Lucilla Giovanninetti –  Martina Obid Mlakar –  Marco PiccialiChiara LucatoBarbara UderzoAude MedoriTania PalazziRoberta RisoloJasmina WeissSilvia Beccaria –  Patrizia Bonati & Nelly Bonati Daniela RepettoLuisa ChiandottoSébastien CarréRomi BukovecTinka LoncarAleksandra AtanasovskiYasmin VinogradGigi Mariani Maria Chiara CassaràAlix TranFlora SicaLaura VolpiNataša GrandovecHuberto ŠirokaAnnie Sibert Žarko OgnjenovičAna SabolićMarta PejoskaRoberta PavoneSilvia Valenti Petra BoleBibi KlekackoskaLosch EmilieMonika Šangulin –  Sandra KocjancicInbar Shahak Galit Einav —  Sara Progressi. — Rosanna Raljević Ceglar (NIIRO Jewelry) -

La manifestazione è promossa dal Comune di Muggia in Italia e dal Comune di Izola in Slovenia è stata reralizzata con il contributo della Provincia di Trieste.  
Tra gli artisti che partecipano il pluripremiato Sébastien Carré , Francia, vincitore tra l’altro del premio  « Giovane creatore » al salone Révelation di Parigi nell’autunno scoroso, Gigi Mariani, Primo Premio nel 2014 a « Joya » a Barcellona o l’industrial design Petra Bole della Slovenia.  Le opere esposte saranno oggetto di una selezione a cura della giuria internazionale composta da:   
Jean-Yves Le Mignot – curatore mostre bijou 
Vered Babai – artista orafa israeliana  
Marianne Gassier – blogger di «bijoux contemporain»  
Giovanni Micera – Direttore della rivista «Preziosa Magazine»  
Agatha Ruiz de la Prada , stilista spagnola che ha fatto del colore e della forma il suo credo conosciuto in tutto il mondo, è la madrina d’eccezione di questa manifestazione.  

FiloRosso 2015 -Sebastien Carré - broche  front: Sebastien Carré - broche – proposition pour FiloRosso 2015


 Quest’anno viene inoltre presentato ilcoup de coeur”: mostra dedicata a Silvia Beccaria e a Vered Babai, artista israeliana che espone per la prima volta in Italia.

Silvia Beccaria  -  Palazzo del Municipio- Izola- SloveniaSilvia Beccaria  -  Palazzo del Municipio- Izola- Slovenia

Silvia Beccaria  -  Palazzo del Municipio- Izola- SloveniaSilvia Beccaria  -  Palazzo del Municipio- Izola- Slovenia

Vered Babai - broochesMuggia – Museo U Carà – expo « coup de coeur » Vered Babai

Muggia - Museo U Carà - expo "coup de coeur" Vered BabaiMuggia – Museo U Carà – expo « coup de coeur » Vered Babai

***

Scuola di Musica di Izola "Palazzo Besenghi" - point culminant de la soirée avec cette jeune musicienne de 16 ans .... elle joue depuis 10 ans .... sa musique était tellement belle, elle, elle en devenait encore plus belle, illuminée .... MAGIQUE !!! MERCI !!! Scuola di Musica di Izola « Palazzo Besenghi » – point culminant de la soirée avec cette jeune musicienne de 16 ans …. elle joue depuis 10 ans …. sa musique était tellement belle, elle, elle en devenait encore plus belle, illuminée …. MAGIQUE !!! MERCI !!!

 

 

Museo d’Arte Ugo Carà
Via Roma, 9,
34015 Muggia TS, Italie
tel +39 040 927 8632

 

Sala Comunale d’Arte «Giuseppe Negrisin»
Piazza Marconi 1
34015 – Muggia Italy
Telephone: +39 403360340
website: www.benvenutiamuggia.eu
mail: ufficio.cultura@comunedimuggia.ts.it
info.filorossobijoux@gmail.com 
DRAT-GALLERY - Sandra Kocjančič 
Ljubljanska ul.21
6310 Izola Slovenia
tel +386 41 952 918

 

 

 

02/08/2015

EXPO ‘SIX: new work by six young makers’ – Gallery Velvet da Vinci, San Francisco (USA) – 1-15 Aout 2015

Six: Nikki Couppee, Hunter Creel, Zachery Lechtenberg, Andrew Kuebeck, Aric Verrastro, Vincent Pontillo-Verrastro

 Artists’ Reception: Saturday, August 1, 6-8 pm
Velvet da Vinci is proud to present 6, an exhibition of jewelry and sculptural objects by six young voices in the field. Featured artists include Nikki Couppee, Hunter Creel, Zachery Lechtenberg, Andrew Kuebeck, Aric Verrastro, and Vincent Pontillo-Verrastro. Working with a range of processes and techniques, each artist brings a fresh perspective to their craft and material lineage. The show will run from August 1-15, 2015. An opening reception with the artists will take place on August 1st, from 6-8 pm.

 

Velvet da Vinci - 6: New Work by Six Young Makers -

Participating Artists:
Nikki Couppee Hunter CreelZachery LechtenbergAndrew KuebeckAric Verrastro —   Vincent Pontillo-Verrastro

 Vincent Pontillo-Verrastro "Pfoufe 6", 2015 PLA plastic, recycled fox fur, steelVincent Pontillo-Verrastro « Pfoufe 6″, 2015 PLA plastic, recycled fox fur, steel
Vincent Pontillo-Verrastro’s current presents a dialogue emphasizing the primacy of touch in experiencing jewelry, focusing on the tactile and functional properties of the brush.

Aric Verrastro, Velvet da Vinci, DriftingAric Verrastro,   Drifting – brooch
Aric Verrastro creates souvenirs in the form of jewelry, intended to capture the essence of noteworthy places and events from the past and present of the artist’s personal history. Verrastro earned undergraduate degrees in Metals/Jewelry and Studio Art from SUNY Buffalo State College. He recently earned an MFA in Metalsmithing/Jewelry at Indiana University (Bloomington, IN), where he currently serves as Associate Instructor in Metalsmithing and Jewelry Design

Nikki Couppee Necklace: Neogem, 2015 Plexiglass, brass, fine silver, sterling silver, found objectsNikki Couppee Necklace: Neogem, 2015 Plexiglass, brass, fine silver, sterling silver, found objects
Nikki Couppee’s recent work investigates the performative social functions of jewelry, utilizing Plexiglass, brass, and found objects in place of precious gems and metals. Working with everyday materials she intuitively creates her own versions of gemstones, hand cast and faceted in luminescent plastics. Couppee received an M.F.A. in Jewelry/ Metals from Kent State University, Kent, Ohio (2011) and a B.F.A. from the University of Georgia, Athens Georgia in Jewlery/Metals (2007).

Andrew Kuebeck - "second place" brooch - Sterling Silver, Fine Silver, Enamel, Toner Decal, Steel; Fabricated, Cast, Enameled, FusedAndrew Kuebeck – « second place » brooch – Sterling Silver, Fine Silver, Enamel, Toner Decal, Steel; Fabricated, Cast, Enameled, Fused
 Andrew Kuebeck , recipient of the 2012 SNAG Emerging Artist award, works in a variety of formats ranging from functional jewelry to sculptural objects and vessels. Inspired by Beefcake photography of the 1960’s and 70’s, his recent felt pieces explore the incorporation of photographic images into textiles, jewelry, and objects.

Hunter Creel "Officer Mama" 2015 copper, brass, acrylic & enamel paintHunter Creel « Officer Mama » 2015 copper, brass, acrylic & enamel paint
Hunter Creel creates bold sculptural objects, utilizing a language of simple forms drawn from the realms of the utilitarian and the abstract. Powder-coated in vibrant hues of enamel paint,

 

 

 

Velvet da Vinci
2015 Polk Street,
San Francisco, CA 94109
Phone: 415-441-0109
Email:  info@velvetdavincigallery.com
Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11am – 6pm, Sunday, 11am – 4pm

 

 

 

 

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