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05/12/2016

EXPO ‘IRREVERSIBLE’ – Popeye loves Olive gallery, Athens (GR) – 2-16 Dec. 2016

Raluca Buzura Solo Exhibition

IRREVERSIBLE
*impossible to return to a previous condition

 Opening: 02 December at 19.00
 Raluca Buzura Solo Exhibition
Popeye Loves Olive – Art Space presents, for the first time in Greece the Romanian jewelry artist Raluca Buzura. Using porcelain as a medium, the artist is creating three-dimensional jewelry, combining the organic forms with the elements of nature. 

   Raluca Buzura Solo Exhibition « IRREVERSIBLE

*impossible to return to a previous condition
Each human being lives for himself and takes his own actions, but as soon as he does it, this action, committed at a certain moment in time becomes irreversible and makes itself a part of the history. Therefore, my whole work defines the irreversibility of the actions I chose to take and of the material itself: once acquired a certain shape, at the end of the process, it cannot go backward, it becomes permanent. »
Nothing we do is inevitable, but everything we do is irreversible” -Joy Williams

Raluca Buzura  neckpiece

Raluca Buzura  neckpiece   - porcelain, transparent glaze, colloidal gold

 cover of "New Necklaces" Book by Nicolas Estrada with Raluca Buzura necklace cover of « New Necklaces » Book by Nicolas Estrada with Raluca Buzura necklace

Raluca Buzura  neckpieceRaluca Buzura  neckpiece   - porcelain, transparent glaze, colloidal gold

Raluca Buzura  neckpieceRaluca Buzura  neckpiece  – porcelain, transparent glaze, colloidal gold, leather ribbon, gold plated silver locks

Raluca Buzura  neckpieceRaluca Buzura  neckpiece

Raluca Buzura  broochRaluca Buzura  brooch

Raluca Buzura  neckpieceRaluca Buzura  neckpiece – porcelain, transparent glaze, colloidal gold, artificial leather, gold plated silver locks

Raluca Buzura  broochRaluca Buzura  brooch - porcelain, transparent glaze, colloidal gold, artificial leather, metal lock

Raluca Buzura  braceletRaluca Buzura  bracelet

Raluca Buzura  - brooch - porcelain, transparent glaze, colloidal gold,  metal lockRaluca Buzura  brooch - porcelain, transparent glaze, colloidal gold,  metal lock

About the artist:
———————————–
I attended the University of Art and Design in Cluj-Napoca, Romania, department ceramic-glass-metal, and then, from 2007,
I followed master in the same section.
During the studies, my works were in the installation area, participating in various projects and exhibitions. Since 2009, main focus becomes contemporary jewelry design.
My interest in jewelry may also come from the fact that this area has not been given much attention. Frequently, people use to see it only as an over plus brought to the human body, that has a value depending on the material used. Therefore, it was also a challenge to change viewer’s angle and to reveal an alternative, and more precisely that jewelry can be considered a work of art in its own right, having an artistic understanding, concept and message that can cover a wide range of fields. I continued to work by maintaining a preference for ceramic materials, due to the transformation of the material from one state to another: once acquired a certain shape, it can’t return to what it was before.
I like to combine seemingly fragile ceramic material with metal hardness or the warmth of a fabric, then to submit the form to compositional experiments that create the most expressive side of my creations. My work is a translation in porcelain of my personal experiences, trying to obliterate these traces during the process by simplifying the boundaries between real and abstract, in a swirl of colors and lines waterfalls from which are foreseen flashes of gold. The result of these experiences I like to think that is a legacy, a proof of my existence that reflects on the society, making it if not better, at least more beautiful and trying to rekindle the gap between public and art, by presenting a variety of aesthetic shapes and ideas that could remove it from the serial area.

 

 

Popeye loves olive
Limpona 5, Plateia Agias Eirinis,
10560 Athènes
opening hours: Tues.-Sat. 12.00-20.00, Sun-Mon. closed

 

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23/09/2015

EXPO during JOYA Barcelona OFF 2015 : ‘To Recover’ – Klimt02 Gallery, Barcelona (ES) – 7 Oct.-7 Nov. 2015

exhibition being part of « OFF JOYA » 2015

http://www.joyabarcelona.com/images/Prensa/logo_joya.jpg

To RecoverKlimt02 Gallery

Opening : 7 October from 19 h.

To Recover Exhibition  / 07Oct - 7Nov2015 Klimt02 Gallery  (Ted Noten Superbitch Bag, 2000 / Superbitch Bag Revisited, 2015)

Artist list   Simon CottrellKarl FritschGésine HackenbergKarin JohanssonJiro KamataSari LiimattaStefano MarchettiTed NotenNoon Passama –  Annelies PlanteydtTore SvenssonLisa WalkerManon van Kouswijk

Manon van Kouswijk Pearl Grey necklace, 2008 / Pearl Grey Revisited necklace, 2015 Glass elements (saucer, hand formed cup handle with attached glass beads), diverse glass and plastic beads, polyester thread, glue.  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Manon van Kouswijk Pearl Grey necklace, 2008 / Pearl Grey Revisited necklace, 2015 Glass elements (saucer, hand formed cup handle with attached glass beads), diverse glass and plastic beads, polyester thread, glue.  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

The original « Pearl Grey » of 2009 was an assemblage work consisting of found and made elements of porcelain, glass, wood, plastic and pearl. It referenced a traditional cup and saucer of which the cup had been magically replaced by a bead necklace. For this new work I have translated that idea to the typology of a glass ‘saucer and cup’. It is again a combination of found and made elements but this time the work is completely transparent; almost like an x-ray of it’s predecessor

Gésine Hackenberg Still Life, 2009 / Pink Balancing Glass brooch, 2015 Glass by Theresienthal, silver  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Gésine Hackenberg Still Life, 2009 / Pink Balancing Glass brooch, 2015 Glass by Theresienthal, silver  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

The ‘Still Life’ Brooches that I have made between 2009 and 2012 can be seen as a contemporary interpretation of 17th and 18th century Dutch Still Life paintings. This subject was preferable used to portray items of daily life that were emotionally and economically significant for people of that time.  Within my ‘Still Lifes’, I sliced existing glasswork and rearranged them into new compositions. They represented a perfect translation of the three dimensional to the two dimensional, the realistic vista of the glasses to the medium of jewellery. The body is taking on the role of the canvas as it were…  Within the new work I explored another way of looking at tableware than in a static composition: I wanted to express a certain precarious dynamic that is inherent to drinking glasses during a sociable meal. I tried to catch this moment of a glass tumbling, undecided yet if it is going to fall or stay upright.

 Sari Liimatta But I love Him object, 2005 / But they don´t love him pendant, 2015 Glass beads, metal link, thread (polyamide), a plastic toy  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Sari Liimatta But I love Him object, 2005 / But they don´t love him pendant, 2015 Glass beads, metal link, thread (polyamide), a plastic toy  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

Just as men are not just men, and women just women, meat is never just meat. It has it´s past and origin, a story which is so often simply forgotten. Living creatures which are very much alive until they are nothing more than materials, for those who still choose to use them. Even the life before their death is so often more than problematic, as we all know. As we all know.

 Annelies Planteijdt Beautiful City - Pink Stairs necklace, 2001 / Beautiful City-Pink Stairs Black Crystal necklace, 2015 Gold, Tantalum, pigment  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Annelies Planteijdt Beautiful City – Pink Stairs necklace, 2001 / Beautiful City-Pink Stairs Black Crystal necklace, 2015 Gold, Tantalum, pigment  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015 

 I started to re-consider a piece from 2001, that never has been sold, although I liked it very much, ‘Beautiful City – Pink Stairs’.  This piece is really symmetrical, so I decided to look for a way to separate it in two parts and finish both parts in a different way, in order to get two different pieces. I have re-collected parts of other (unsold) pieces from about the same time (1999 and 2000) and have been re-approaching and re-thinking them: I made ‘Crystals’ with them, like I did in my most recent work. So I have been mixing time and thinking. And size: the sizes I used earlier were different from the sizes I used in the later ‘Beautiful City’ series, they wouldn’t have fit. But because the ‘Crystals’ are liquid (they adapt to the square) the size of the elements was not importantanymore. So I could re-take these old pieces into the new time now, I have re-used them, re-connected them.
This ‘expansion’ offered me more possibilities: I re-used the material I already had without loss of material or time. The possibility to re-make the old pieces still exists. And it gave me two new pieces. So I multiplied my possibilities. A new life.

 Noon Passama Formal Research - A necklace, 2015 / Formal Research - H rings, 2015 Rigid clay, silver, gold  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Noon Passama Formal Research – A necklace, 2015 / Formal Research – H rings, 2015 Rigid clay, silver, gold  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

 Formal Research – A necklace (2015) composing of six chain units is the starting point of the group of six rings. A closed-end loop of each ring was divided in sections, one / two / three /… / six, by the difference between the fat and thin parts. The works were made under the following keywords: dividing / sequencing / sizing.
Formal Research initially focused on one classical type of jewellery: the chain. The project is mainly about the form of each connecting chain unit and how the unit connects to its neighbours.
During the sculpting process, the shapes were transformed because of them being in the hand and through time. I did not edit the outcomes and will present the rings as they are. The try-outs are the finals and vice versa.

 Stefano Marchetti Untitled brooch, 2007 / Untitled Revisited brooch, 2015 Silver, silver and titan powder, epoxy resin  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Stefano Marchetti Untitled brooch, 2007 / Untitled Revisited brooch, 2015 Silver, silver and titan powder, epoxy resin  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.:

 In the Nineties, in the making of the older brooch, my goal was to control the metal, to have the metal do whatever I wanted. In this latest brooch, made a few days ago, I let instead the metal take control over myself, and let it take me wherever its will would go.

Tore Svensson Mr. T brooch, 2011 / Mr. T Revisited brooch, 2015 (5 different versions) Veneer wood, acrylic paint, silver  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Tore Svensson Mr. T brooch, 2011 / Mr. T Revisited brooch, 2015 (5 different versions) Veneer wood, acrylic paint, silver  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

The reason why I chosen my self-portrait, is that it is probably one of my most well known pieces of jewellery. It is made in steel and etched.  The material and techniques I mostly work with. For the Re-version I saw out the silhouette in 2 mm veneer, divided the image in 3 parts and painted them in similar but for each piece different colours, before I glued them together. The fact that they are divided in three parts, with the dark sawing-line between, gives them a comic-like impression.
This impression is even emphasised by the bigger size, which is possible by the lightness of the material, and is completely different from the original steel-one. While the surface of the steel-portrait and other previous work was the key technology for building the image, the colour for some years been a part of my jewellery.

 

To revisit, remake, salvage, reinterpret, adapt, convert, converse, rethink…
  Why have we asked some of the artists we work with as gallery owners to reinterpret one of their works? We could say it’s because we’re interested in talking about time. And by “revisiting” we mean discussing the notion of time. But in what way? That’s the question.
Time passes, it is made, interpreted, felt and suffered, it escapes, drifts away, becomes trapped or stretched, sometimes it is intelligently ignored and, why not, it is exercised. Reinterpreting a work, a fiction or precis is a way of addressing time, a way of exploring a landscape in order to try and understand it. And we thought this exercise would provide an interesting opportunity to discuss time.
Revisiting in order to reflect… an exercise for the artist.
  Are there any changes in these artists’ works? Should there be? Is time involved? Without a shadow of a doubt, the answer is yes. But that barely scrapes the surface of what we want to know.
We’re more likely to find out what we want to know if the work enables us to answer questions such as: What kind of time is involved? Is there any usefulness? Is there any spirituality? Are there any aesthetics? Is there any abstraction? Is there any progress?
The exhibition is also designed to be understood through an analysis of the different types of answers provided by the works as a whole. As you will see, there are answers that simplify, offering minor changes, non-answers, coherent answers (if you have prior knowledge of the artist’s trajectory), inspired answers, uninventive answers… As we have said, evaluating the “revisits” as a whole provides additional knowledge.
When it comes down to it, what we most value is the sensation we observe and feel when the artist takes some distance and moves away from the centre stage in an attempt to provide an answer. As observers, we believe this circumstance helps to achieve universality and thus provide an intellectual satisfaction, that of communicating and objectifying the creation to the full in order to express and play with a more authentic reality.
Revisiting in order to look afresh… the viewer’s exercise.
We switch from observation to understanding, and vice versa. We observe in order to find differences between similar things and we understand when we find similarities between different things. Accustomed as we are today to viewing several pieces in a highly random fashion, pausing to stop in order to take a fresh look at a work “inaugurated” some time ago is another exercise we wish to propose. This exercise may help us assimilate better in this era of accumulation and, on occasions, superficiality. There can be no doubt that the way in which a work attracts and engages us is based on the knowledge we may have of it.
Knowledge without criticism is an indication of the end of everything. Yet, on the other hand, what can be said of criticism without knowledge? Are we capable of enjoying what these workers of art offer us? Will we be capable of evaluating what they show us? Can we offer knowledge-based criticism? Frankly, we find there is a lack of humility on the part of the viewer. And we’re all viewers.
Let’s enjoy this opportunity.

 

 

Klimt02 Gallery
Riera de Sant Miquel 65
08006 -  Barcelona
Monday to Friday / 11 -14 and 16-19 h.

 

 

 

24/01/2015

selected for SCHMUCK 2015 : Kaori Juzu

Classé dans : email / enamel,Japon (JP),Kaori JUZU (JP/DK),SCHMUCK / MJW (DE) — bijoucontemporain @ 0:13

Kaori Juzu

«  »Jewellery » is a word that can give anyone a concrete image in a moment, though it is associated with so many different sorts of work.
The word itself is so common that no one seems to pay attention anymore.
And there could be a gap between my work and what people usually recognize as jewellery…
One day I found one precious name in danish which better describes,
what I experience in the process of making
« klenodie »
treasure, gem, jewel …just a small thing,
but it always makes me feel warm. »

Kaori Juzu - mare nostrum - brooch 2012. enamel, copper, 14kt gold. Kaori Juzu – mare nostrum – brooch 2012. enamel, copper, 14kt gold.
nominated for Mari Funaki Award for Contemporary Jewellery

« Handmade Enamel Treasures by Kaori Juzu
I love it when craft can pull through and show its face in a number of different realms. Often you see this in galleries, where an artist creates using handiwork that might be considered craft. But they don’t use the material for functional purposes, mainly for expression and to build on a concept or idea. If there’s someone who sits in this murky area it would be artist Kaori Juzu. Born in Fukuoka, Japan she moved to Bornholm in Denmark to study art, where she then founded a small line of jewellery. After training with well-known Danish jewellery designer Per Suntum, Kaori set up her own studio producing experimental brooches.
Kaori crafts by hand what she now calls ‘klenodie’. This title is a Danish word for artefact, gem, jewel, or treasure, encapsulating her pieces under this wide spectrum. She uses a mixture of copper, silver, and gold depending on the idea at hand. The metal is carefully hammered and sculpted in to shape, after a mixture of enamels (powdered glass) are applied to the metal which react in the kiln at high temperature creating a unique colour pattern and surface texture. Her forms and compositions are quite exquisite, they remind me of abstract objects carefully arranged on a canvas, the only twist is that they’re actually made of metal and are at a smaller scale. It’s fantastic to see such experimentation.
The more I explore as a creative the less I’m worried about the particular medium used. It’s more impressive to see a creative use a multitude of materials to bring an idea in to fruition, overstepping the boundaries as it were. I’m intrigued by Kaori’s work and can’t wait to see more from her in the near future, if you have time I’d recommend watching this video piece (see above) on how she produces these objects and what inspires her. » (An introduction by Mark Robinson at OEN – the189.com)

Kaori Juzu, "so close : so far" - brooch series # 2 2013. enamel, copper, silverKaori Juzu, « so close : so far » – brooch series # 2 2013. enamel, copper, silver

Kaori Juzu - voyage - brooch 2012. enamel, copper, silver, 24kt gold, fine silverKaori Juzu - « voyage » – brooch 2012. enamel, copper, silver, 24kt gold, fine silver

Kaori Juzu, mare mea - brooch 2012. enamel, copper, 14kt goldKaori Juzu, mare mea – brooch 2012. enamel, copper, 14kt gold

Kaori Juzu, "looking for rose-buds" - brooch 2012. enamel, copper, silverKaori Juzu, « looking for rose-buds » – brooch 2012. enamel, copper, silver

 

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24/10/2014

EXPO ‘Émaux at this Moment’ – Galerie Noel Guyomarc’h, Montreal (CA) – 17 Oct -16 Nov 2014

Émaux at this Moment - Galerie Noel Guyomarc’h

Émaux at this Moment: International Exhibition of Contemporary Enamel Jewelry and Objects

Galerie Noel Guyomarc'h - ‎ÉMAUX AT THIS MOMENT - https://www.facebook.com/events/321732944665641/permalink/321735397998729/ - - - X
Galerie Noel Guyomarc’h presents contemporary enamel work by 23 international artists. Curated by Jamie Bennett, renowned American jewelry artist, this exhibition offers an overview of the current use of enamel in contemporary jewelry and objects.
Opening reception: Friday, October 17, 2014, 5-8pm

Émaux at this Moment - Galerie Noel Guyomarc'h - Annamaria Zanella Brooch: Little Butterfly, 2011 Silver, rock crystal, enamel, gold]Annamaria Zanella Brooch: Little Butterfly, 2011 Silver, rock crystal, enamel, gold
***
«This exhibition was conceived to point at a particular phenomenon that is occurring in contemporary jewelry internationally. Enamel as color, surface and image has been reinvigorated and to some degree reinvented as a significant material used by jewelers and metalsmiths internationally. While jewelry has certainly been the primary benefactor and represents the larger part of this exhibition, there has also been a great shift in its use on vessels and tile work. For most of the twentieth century enamel was defined and executed in very specific processes, such as cloisonné, champlevé and Limoges, all very traditional and refined. Modernism did have its influence on more gestural enamel work in the mid fifties and early sixties but even that became formulaic and predictable.
The advent of experimentation with a wide range of materials used by jewelers from the late 20th century to where we are today brought a new curiosity and interest in enamel as a material and not a specific process related to it. The qualities of enamel that drew interest were the inherent characteristics of a vitreous powder that needed a substrate of metal, onto which it melted, flowed and hardened. These became the defining properties jewelers and metalsmiths were interested in without the boundaries of particular processes. The use of enamel by jewelers in this exhibition can be quite raw and in other cases well rendered, but each piece demonstrates a willingness and determination to see what this material can do well.
Contemporary jewelry has for some decades witnessed a shift toward a more democratic use of materials, where plastic stands beside gold, and coal replaces diamonds. Traditional materials were traded in or juxtaposed with materials that possessed a more abstracted value. While the seed of this shift was in part socio/ political and an attempt to rid contemporary jewelry of its status as a symbol of luxury, the qualities of the “new” materials themselves began to manifest their own presence in the work. All materials have inherent meaning, but they also have a visual presence that can be used to reinforce what we think jewelry can be and should be. Enamel as a material and a practice has and will continue to hold qualities that contribute to the field of jewelry and metalwork. It is very exciting to see work from all corners of the world where one material has gained a new momentum and its appearance has been adjusted to fulfill our needs from jewelry and metalwork today. To borrow a phrase from painting, enamel is not dead, it has many ways of occuring and that is clearly apparent in the jewelry and metalwork in EMAUX AT THIS MOMENT.»
Jamie Bennett,  Exhibition curator
Annamaria Zanella  - brooch Annamaria Zanella – brooch « Red Cage », 2011 Argent, émail, or, pigment, resin – 7.3 x 7 x 3.5 cm
Stephen Bottomley Brooch: Black on red, Enamel, steel, rubber - Émaux at this MomentStephen Bottomley Brooch: Black on red, Enamel, steel, rubber
Sarah Perkins Brooch: Vertical Black Drusy, 2014 Copper, silver, enamel, drusy - Émaux at this MomentSarah Perkins Brooch: Vertical Black Drusy, 2014 Copper, silver, enamel, drusy
Silvia Walz Brooch: Still life with scissors 1, Copper, enamel - Émaux at this MomentSilvia Walz Brooch: Still life with scissors 1, Copper, enamel

Artist list

Johan van Aswegen — Atsuko Bauman — Kate Bauman Mess –Alicia Jane Boswell –  Stephen Bottomley – Helen Carnac – Bettina Dittlmann –  Carolina GimenoArthur HashKaori Juzu Heejoo Kim –  Stefano Marchetti  – Myra Mimlitsch-Gray — Qu Megnan — Sarah Perkins — Philip SajetBarbara SeidenathBettina SpecknerJessica TurrellGraziano Visintin –  Silvia Walz  — Annamaria Zanella – Jamie Bennett

 Jessica Turrell Necklace: Untitled, 2014 Vitreous enamel on etched copper, silver - Émaux at this MomentJessica Turrell Necklace: Untitled, 2014 Vitreous enamel on etched copper, silver
Carolina Gimeno Necklace: Portable Pleasures – When intimacy become public, Socks, copper, enamel, leather, silver - Émaux at this MomentCarolina Gimeno Necklace: Portable Pleasures – When intimacy become public, Socks, copper, enamel, leather, silver
Barbara Seidenath Brooch: Twisted, Sterling, enamel on fine silver 2012 - Émaux at this MomentBarbara Seidenath Brooch: Twisted, Sterling, enamel on fine silver 2012
Alicia Jane Boswell Brooch: SNAG, 2013 Enamel on steel, green turquoise, CZ, sterling silverAlicia Jane Boswell Brooch: SNAG, 2013 Enamel on steel, green turquoise, CZ, sterling silver
Arthur Hash Brooch: Untitled, 2014 Sterling silver, enamel, copper, stainless steel - Émaux at this MomentArthur Hash Brooch: Untitled, 2014 Sterling silver, enamel, copper, stainless steel
4836 Bd St Laurent,
Montréal, QC H2T 1R5, Canada
Téléphone :+1 514-840-9362

23/02/2014

EXPO ‘Ni Hao’ – Gallery Kobeia, Munich (DE) – 13-18 Mars 2014

SCHMUCK 2014 – Munich – 12-18 Mars 2014

Ni Hao ! - 10 contemporary jewellery artists from Taiwan

The emerging Taiwan-based art jewelry group “Bench 886” is scheduled to present their works at Schmuck 2014 Munich Germany Jewelry Fair, showing the rich variety of their artistic energy on the international stage which is regarded as the Oscars in art jewelry

Ni Hao - 10 contemporaryjewellery artists from Taiwan
‘Hi’ (Ni Hao in Chinese) is a magic greeting word that initiates communication, just  as a key that opens the door to a discussion, a bridge that crosses the  boundaries of silence. Language very often goes beyond its linguistic meaning;   however, it is also confined to linguistic competence. If there is a way that  crosses the borders of language and speaks up one’s opinions through work piece,  so that everyone, regardless of language, could feel the frequency of the world;  that would be art.
‘Ni Hao! (hi) We are art  jewellery artists from Taiwan!’
Image de prévisualisation YouTube
Mei-Fang Chiang dialogues the relationship between soul and work  itself ;
Cai-Xuan (Molly) Wu and Heng Lee discover the beauty of knitting and  embroidery in an unconventional way;
Wen-Miao Yeh and Yu-Ping Lin develop the  Origami and paper cutting in structural dramatic forms;
Shih-Dea (Deborah) Tseng  and Ying-Hsun (Zita) Hsu reveal the vague and abstract spirit of ‘Zen’  in the perceptions of touch and vision;
Han-Chieh (Joy) Chuang, Ying-Hsiu Chen and Yung-Huei Chao combine the inspiration from  Mother Nature with the memory toward motherland.
‘Ten jewellery artists come from the same land, ten storytellers  looking forward to a whole new page in their lives.’
Yu-Ping Lin Textile Jewellery - kaleidoscope serie -  Strawberry (Ka03-1F) - Bracelet/ Brooch  Felt, PolyesterYu-Ping Lin Textile Jewellery – kaleidoscope serie -  Strawberry  Bracelet/ Brooch  Felt, Polyester
Heng Lee  Floral Embroidery- Pixel 4.2

Heng Lee -  Floral Embroidery- Pixel serie – back of a brooch (detail)

YEH WEN-MIAO [TAIWAN] 大賞 Grand Prix 「The Space 2013」Wen-Miao Yeh – Brooches – The Space 2013 – Plastic, cooper, paint
 Ying-Hsui Chen / CHEN YING HSIU [TAIWAN] 「Sketch Series-Seashell  XXI~XXVII」
Ying-Hsui Chen – Sketch Series-Seashell  XXI~XXVII – super-light soil, stockings, poly, 22K plated brass, 22K plated stainless steel
 YING HSIU CHEN -TAIWAN Shell ring - made of clay and stockingsYing-Hsui Chen-  Shell ring – made of clay and stockings
【CAI-XUAN(Molly) WU】: Transit:Knitting No.1, Brooch (2012) / Acryli, steel wireCai-Xuan (Molly) Wu – Transit:Knitting No.1, Brooch (2012) / Acryl., steel wire
Molly Wu, Taiwan - plankton brooch 2013Cai-Xuan (Molly) Wu (ou Tzu-Jung (Molly) Wu) – plankton brooch 2013
Shih-Ti Tseng (Deborah Tseng)  - porcelain, plaster, leather necklace 2012Shih-Dea (Deborah) Tseng (Shih-Ti (Deborah) Tseng) – porcelain, plaster, leather necklace 2012
Mei Fang Chian (Taiwan)

Mei-Fang Chiang

Ying-Hsiu (Zita) HsuYing-Hsiu (Zita) Hsu
YING-HSUN(ZITA) HSU-TAIWAN/UK: In Flux. B1(2013) / Magnetism, white gold platedYing-Hsiu (Zita) Hsu – In Flux. B1(2013) / Brooch, brass, magnetism, resin
Han-Chieh (Joy) ChuangHan-Chieh (Joy) Chuang -  red brick brooch 2013, brooch, silver, copper, enamel, steel
Yung-Huei Chao Yung-Huei Chao Window Series II, Bracelets (2010) Nilckel silver
 
 
Luisenstraße 49
80333 München

09/02/2014

EXPO ‘Gioielli Alternativi’ – Fiera Abilmente di Vicenza, Vicenza (IT) – 20-23 Fevr. 2014

« Gioielli alternativi: ingegno e creatività indossabile », Vicenza, Italia

Abilmente, Fiera di Vicenza

Gioielli Alternativi

The exhibition « Unconventional Jewels: Wearable Talent and Creativity« , hosted at Abilmente on the Vicenza fairgrounds, is dedicated to body ornaments testifying to the happy mix between manual skills and courageous insights gaining their strength from artist’s experiences, preferences and personal histories.
Curated by Nunzia De Feo is organized by associazione Nurò established in Verona, that aims to enhance works by artists and designers working on contemporary jewelry.
The more than one hundred works that will be presented, created ​​by 38 artists from various countries, in their wearability, meet the need, as old as humanity, to create artifacts with which to inevitably communicate fragments of real life stories and for this reason authentic .
As stated by one of the participants, the London based artist-goldsmith Joanne Haywood in her interesting book « Mixed-media Jewellery », there is no limit to the choice of materials to use. The rings, bracelets, necklaces, earrings and brooches exhibited are made ​​of ceramic, fiber, yarn, horn, leather, plastics, metals, wood, resin, silicone, enamels and fabrics, sometimes recycled and used in different ways to produce innovative solutions. Metal is not one of the preferred choices and is often absent or relegated to a marginal role.
In light of this consideration, the link is evident between this show and Abilmente, place of choice for fresh and important encounters with materials and experiences and with the objects of the workshops which characterize this fair.
In conclusion, these « unconventional jewels » possess an intriguing and captivating charm, sometimes as naive as disarming. They are characterized by a narrative or abstract language rich of symbolic or conceptual references and by a raw, bitter , pungent, or sometimes, by contrast, graceful, kind and almost childlike aesthetic. They offer rare moments of intellectual and spiritual empathy to visitors. They are « little living worlds » capable of awakening dormant emotions, never suspected inclinations and reflect today’s contemporaneity crossed by the incessant demand for vitality and positive zeal.
Curator Nunzia De Feo

(at Gioielli Alternativi) Marion DelarueMarion Delarue

Artistas participantes :

Luis Acosta (AR/NL) — Patricia Alvarez (AR) — Rafael Luis Alvarez Main (AR) — Agata Bartos (PL) — Elizabeth Bone (UK) — Isabelle Busnel (FR/UK) — Elizabeth Campbell (UK) — Aurelio Castano (USA) — Patricia Cruz (IT) –  Nunzia De Feo (IT) –  Marion Delarue (FR) — Corrado De Meo (IT) — Clara Del Papa (IT) –  Suzanne Esser (NL) — Resi Girardello (IT) — Laura Giusti (AR) — Marianna Hadass (UK) — Liz Hamman (UK) — Joanne Haywood (UK) – Paula Isola (AR) — Laserbean (UK) — Paula Lindblon (SE) — Francesca Marcenaro (IT/UK) — Rita Martinez  (CR/IT) — Robyn McLean (UK), Mikiko Minewaki (JP) — Maria Rosa Mongelli (AR) — Louise Perrone (CA) — Jelka Quintelier  (UK) — Wanda Romano  (IT) — Swing Kit (UK) — Uniqeco (FI) – Julie Usel (UK) — Stella Valencia (CR) — Monica Vinci (IT) — Iolanda Violante (IT) — Seo Jeong Woo (KR) – Melania Zucchi (IT)

Luis Acosta - bracciale  (at Gioielli Alternativi)Luis Acosta - bracciale
Laura Giusti - necklace (at Gioielli Alternativi)Laura Giusti – necklace

Paula Lindblom, Brooch, 2011Paula Lindblom - Brooch: Untitled, 2011 – Mixed media, glass beads, silver 925

Joanne Haywood, Neckpiece, 2013 Joanne HaywoodNeckpiece: Plant Hunter, 2013 – Silver, silk yarns, Merino felt

Elizabeth Bone, Brooch, 2012Elizabeth BoneBrooch: Geometric, 2012Oxidized silver with orange silk thread – 13x18cm

 Mikiko Minewaki, Brooch, 2006Mikiko Minewaki, Brooch, 2006

DELARUE Marion "Mania" Objet de main. Laque naturelle coréenne, cheveux humains. 2011.
Marion Delarue,   »Mania » Objet de main. Laque naturelle coréenne, cheveux humains. 2011.

Julie Usel - la route de la soie - Princes Von Thurn und Taxis: silk, thread, silver leaf, broochJulie Usel – la route de la soie : brooch « Princes Von Thurn und Taxis » – silk, thread, silver leaf

Jelka Quintelier  Polilla coll.Jelka Quintelier – Polilla, the butterfly of the night. Dark, graceful, rhythmic.

Louise Perrone - "strictly platonic" neckpiece - flag fabric, styrene sheet, nylon thread, sailing cord - 2013  http://louiseperrone.com/Louise Perrone – strictly platonic – Flag fabric, styrene sheet, nylon thread, sailing cord – 2013

Robyn McLean - Velvet Bone BroochRobyn McLean – Velvet Bone Brooch
Clara Del Papa, Ring IguazuClara Del Papa, Ring Iguazu
Corrado de Meo - brocheCorrado de Meo – brooch

 

 

Fiera Abilmente di Vicenza
Via dell »Oreficeria
36100 – Vicenza
Italy
Telephone: 333 7443972
website: www.xn--associazionenur-trb.it
mail: associazionenuroo@gmail.com

03/01/2014

EXPO ‘Pensieri Preziosi 9 : Contemporary Australian Jewellery’ – Oratorio di San Rocco, Padova (Italy) – 30 Nov. 2013 – 23 Fevr. 2014

Pensieri Preziosi 9 : Contemporary Australian Jewellery 

Oratorio di San Rocco (Padova, Italy) 30-Nov-2013 – 23-Feb-2014

 This exhibition allows visitors to get to know, appreciate and examine highly original works created by eight specially chosen artists who have studied at the most important University of Design on the continent of Australia, under the guidance of Prof. Robert Baines”, notes Andrea Colasio, the Municipal Councillor for Culture. Robert Baines is Emeritus Professor at the RMIT University of Melbourne, and together with Nicholas Bastin, Simon Cottrell, Kirsten Haydon, Linda Hughes, Christopher Milbourne, Nicole Polentas and Katherine Wheeler, they have created an exhibition with about one hundred works that will give the Italian public the chance to get to know and appreciate the styles of Australian research goldsmithing.
The works selected for this exhibition use poor materials alongside precious gold, with original and unusual working techniques that combine tradition and innovation: they are conceptually complicated pieces which aim to express each individual artist’s thoughts, feelings and artistic reflection of both the past and the present.
According to Baines, the “poetry of making” needs a tòpos, a real and metaphorical “place” where you can create jewellery. In this search for the tòpos, the artist identifies and indicates four major areas for his students to focus on in order to design and create contemporary jewellery. The tòpos of the “found object”, namely remnants of industrial materials, discarded objects from everyday life, collected and reused by offering them a new dimension and new life; the tòpos of intimate space, personal and private, one’s own body, the home, individual and subjective memories; the tòpos of public space, streets, exteriors and architecture; and the tòpos of history and culture which is inevitably linked to history and personal thoughts.
Australian contemporary jewellery is mainly conceptual, displaying skilful technical experimentation in its use of materials, with a keen focus on personal and collective history, as well as elegant forms with echoes linked to the past but also to modern daily life. At times this produces abstract, fantastical and poetic results which often have a veil of nostalgic irony.
This conceptual process often leads to interpretations that unwind like true stories, real or surreal tales where the works of art are the main characters within a careful and well-thought-out procedure of research and planning.
Pensieri Preziosi 9: Contemporary Australian Jewellery  - Oratorio di San Rocco (Padova, Italy) 30-Nov-2013 - 23-Feb-2014
Artists: Robert Baines — Nicholas Bastin – Simon CottrellKirsten HaydonLinda Hughes — Christopher Milbourne — Nicole PolentasKatherine Wheeler
Robert Baines, Brooch, 2003Robert Baines, Brooch: The Oz Brooch, 2003 – Silver powder coat – 2.0 x 7.5 x 7.5 cm
Broaching it Diplomatically: A Tribute to Madeleine K. Albright. Property of the artist. 
Photo by Garry Sommerfeld
Simon Cottrell, Brooch, 2006Simon Cottrell, Brooch: Blobs and white tubes, 2006 – Monel alloy, powdercoat, phosphorescent pigment, stainless steel
4.0 x 7.0 x 6.0 cm – Private collection –
Photo by Mark Ashkanasy
Kirsten Haydon, Brooch, 2009
Kirsten Haydon, Brooch: Ice valleys, 2009Enamel, photo, copper, reflector beads, silver, steel
9.0 x 13.0 x 1.5 cmProperty of the artistPhoto by Jeremy Dillon
Linda Hughes, Brooch, 2013
Linda Hughes, Brooch: Nicholas 2 pendant (after Giotto), 2013 -  Laminate, wood, silk, silver
9.0 x 7.5 x 1.5 cmProperty of the artistPhoto by Argonaut Design
Nicole Polentas, Brooch, 2011Nicole Polentas, Brooch (brooch ???) : The Dunes of Orthi Ammos and The Drosoulites, 2011Sterling silver, coral, paint, photo, plastic, poly-putty, stainless steel8.0 x 11.0 x 5.5 cmProperty of the artistPhoto by Jeremy Dillon
Katherine Wheeler, Ring, 2013
Katherine Wheeler -  Ring: Flightless, 2013 – Porcelain, fine silver, paper, thread, polyvinyl acetate, paint – 8.5 x 9.5 x 6.0 cm – Property of the artist  - Photo by Katherine Wheeler
Christopher Earl Milbourne, Brooch, 2013Christopher Earl Milbourne, Brooch, Trinity Aquarium with Outdoor Exhibit, 2013
Sterling silver, silver alloys, pearl, paint, epoxy resin7.0 x 8.0 x 6.0 cmProperty of the artist
Photo by Jeremy Dillon
 
 
Oratorio di San Rocco
Oratorio di San Rocco
Via S. Lucia
35139 – Padova
Italy
Telephone: 049 820 4527
website: padovacultura.padovanet.it
mail: serviziomostre@comune.padova.it

19/12/2013

EXPO ‘Pearls’ – V&A Museum (UK) – 21 sept 2013 – 19 janv. 2014

Classé dans : Exposition/Exhibition,perle(s) / beads/pearls,USA,V&A Museum (UK) — bijoucontemporain @ 3:01

Pearls – - Victoria & Albert Museum

Pearls - 21 sept 2013 - 19 janv. 2014 - V&A Museum (Victoria & Albert Museum) http://www.vam.ac.uk/content/exhibitions/exhibition-pearls/about-the-exhibition/
Pearls are a worldwide phenomenon going back millennia. Fascination for these jewels of the sea transcends time and borders. Natural pearls have always been objects of desire due to their rarity and beauty. Myths and legends surrounded them, chiefly to explain the mystery of their formation. Goldsmiths, jewellers and painters exploited their symbolic associations, which ranged from seductiveness to purity, from harbingers of good luck in marriage to messengers of mourning.
……

Pearl jewellery through the ages

Across the Roman Empire jewels with pearls were a desirable and expensive luxury, a symbol of wealth and status. In medieval Europe pearls appear as symbols of authority on regalia, and as attributes of Christ and the Virgin Mary in jewellery, symbolizing purity and chastity. By the Renaissance, portraits show that nobles and affluent merchants were adorned with pearls, the symbolism became increasingly secular.
By the 17th and 18th centuries pearls had become lavish adornments, often worn in a seductive manner. They were also demonstrations of high social rank. By the early 19th century pearls embellished more intimate or ‘sentimental’ jewellery to convey personal messages celebrating love or expressing grief.
The opulence and ceremony enjoyed by the courts of Europe in the 19th century was favourable for pearls, necklaces of all lengths were fashionable, from long ropes to chokers.
In Paris, jewellers working in the Art Nouveau style were fascinated by the extraordinary shaped pearls and transformed them into breathtaking interpretations of nature.
In the ‘Roaring Twenties’ urban life changed fashions, women wore short sleeveless slim-line dresses and pearl sautoirs dangled down to the waist and beyond.

Lover’s Eye brooch, England, 1800-20, gold, pearls, diamonds and painted miniature. Museum no. P.56-1977, © Victoria and Albert Museum, LondonLover’s Eye brooch, England, 1800-20, gold, pearls, diamonds and painted miniature. Museum no. P.56-1977, © Victoria and Albert Museum, London
Bodice ornament  Bodice ornament Spain About 1670 Gold filigree with freshwater pearls Collection of Deborah Elvira Photo © Martin VellónBodice ornament – Spain About 1670 – Gold filigree with freshwater pearlsCollection of Deborah Elvira - Photo © Martin Vellón

Contemporary design

Jewellery design experienced great changes during the second half of the twentieth century. During the 1960s and 1970s avant-garde jewellers in Europe broke away from traditional gem-set jewellery to create abstract sculptural designs with unconventional settings for pearls. In contrast, the high-end jewellers sought a path between tradition and Modernism. From the 1980s, the emphasis for artist jewellers has been less about the value of the pearl and more about novelty of design. Searching for new ways of wearing pearls, they set them in a variety of metals, often with textured surfaces and successfully combined them with non-precious materials.
Today the range of aesthetics in pearl jewellery is boundless and the variety of pearls quite remarkable. Whether natural, cultured or imitation, pearls continue to be fashionable and are being worn by increasing numbers of women. Pearls are a symbol of femininity and timeless jewels befitting at any event or occasion.

'Grand Jeté' brooch, made and designed by Geoffrey Rowlandson (born 1931)  'Grand Jeté' brooch Made and designed by Geoffrey Rowlandson (born 1931) London 1999 18 carat gold, brilliant-cut diamonds and cultured baroque pearls Private Collection © Geoffrey Rowlandson‘Grand Jeté’ broochMade and designed by Geoffrey Rowlandson (born 1931)London 199918 carat gold, brilliant-cut diamonds and cultured baroque pearlsPrivate Collection © Geoffrey Rowlandson

Snow White Wrist Piece 'A Fusion of Winter Snow and Spring Flowers' Made and designed by Nora Fok (born 1952) London 2012 3-D printed white plastic, cultured white pearls Private Collection © Frank Hills, photographerSnow White Wrist Piece ‘A Fusion of Winter Snow and Spring Flowers’Made and designed by Nora Fok (born 1952) – London 2012
– 3D printed white plastic, cultured white pearlsPrivate Collection© Frank Hills, photographer

Brooch Made and designed by Friedrich Becker (1922-1997) Düsseldorf, Germany 1962 18 carat white gold, 96 natural pearls in varying shades RSV Collection © Frau Hilde BeckerBrooch – Made and designed by Friedrich Becker (1922-1997) Düsseldorf, Germany – 1962 – 18 carat white gold, 96 natural pearls in varying shades RSV Collection © Frau Hilde Becker

 

Cromwell Road
London SW7 2RL
020 7942 2000

14/03/2013

Decouverte : Mariko Sumioka, architectured Japan

Classé dans : COUP DE COEUR,Japon (JP),Mariko SUMIOKA (JP) — bijoucontemporain @ 11:24

Mariko Sumioka is a jeweller based in Edinburgh.  Inspired by Japanese traditional architecture and the spirit of Zen, her unique drawings and enamel techniques enable her to explore the inspiration into the wearable jewellery.

and on Facebook

Pray for Japan, Mariko Sumioka http://www.artsthread.com/p/mariko-sumioka
Mariko Sumioka « Pray for Japan » brooch
« I feel awe and respect for natural and man-made objects which have been there and lived since ancient times.
This idea is deeply rooted in my origin: Japanese culture and environments. The Japanese respect, understand and accept nature as one of their members. I am fascinated by Japanese traditional architecture, which is an essential part of human lives as a central part of a culture and a place where people have basic connections with natural surroundings.
I am inspired by Japanese unique architectural characteristics: natural materials and colours, dark and bright contrasts, linear forms, geometric shapes and spaces.
Since human beings live in architecture, there are some reasons in each element. I have researched theoretically and visually into those handed down traditions and tried to bring them into my pieces of jewellery.
My work explores a connection with human bodies and how the wearer and viewer interact with each other, themselves and the objects. Also, studying the principle of Zen and the essence of the Japanese love of nature helps me to understand people’s attitude behind their culture.
Drawing is an essential part of my creation, especially collaging. By adding elements onto others, I always find many different ways of assembling these elements in both drawing and creating jewellery. This technique also helps me to break down my original thoughts into different ideas, and to find new ideas and designs by abstracting elements.
Enamelling with simple colours enables me to explore my images of natural materials and textures which can be found in Japanese architecture. 
I have also challenged and investigated contemporary ideas of jewellery as sculptural objects or body pieces. I do not force people to wear a piece in a certain way, but want people to play with my pieces and find their own ways of wearing them.  » (dazzle-exhibitions)
Mariko Sumioka showed this bamboo brooch in her BA (Hons) in Jewellery and Silversmithing degree show at Edinburgh College of Art. ECA has a very strong history: notable alumni include Eduardo Paolozzi, Elizabeth Blackadder, Callum Innes and Richard Wright   Photograph: PR/Edinburgh College of ArtMariko Sumioka showed this bamboo brooch in her BA (Hons) in Jewellery and Silversmithing degree show at Edinburgh College of Art (ECA) in 2011 -  Photograph: PR/Edinburgh College of Art
Japan blue roofs (inspiration for  Mariko Sumioka )inspiration : Japan blue roofs – toits en tuiles vernissées bleues des vieilles maisons traditionelles japonaises ….
Mariko Sumioka - 'rokusyo no yane' earringsMariko Sumioka – ‘rokusyo no yane’ earrings
Mariko SumiokaMariko SumiokaMosaic Brooch
Mariko Sumioka "yane" mosaic broochMariko Sumioka « yane » mosaic brooch
Mariko Sumioka  Yane Mosaic BroochMariko Sumioka  « Yane » Mosaic Brooch
Mariko Sumioka - broche 'yane to michi'Mariko Sumioka – broche ‘yane to michi’
Mariko Sumioka - 'interior' earrings - oxidised copper, copper, enamel, gold plated silver, silk cordMariko Sumioka – ‘interior’ earrings – oxidised copper, copper, enamel, gold plated silver, silk cord
Mariko Sumioka 'omikuji' broochMariko Sumioka ‘omikuji’ brooch
Mariko Sumioka (BA) - necklace Bamboo Necklace 2011, oxidised copper, enamel on copper, kimono, gold-plated steel cable   800 x 230 x 20 mm - United Kingdom, Edinburgh College of ArtMariko Sumioka – Bamboo Necklace 2011, oxidised copper, enamel on copper, kimono, gold-plated steel cable – 800 x 230 x 20 mm – (BA at United Kingdom, Edinburgh College of Art) (Galerie Marzee)
Mariko Sumioka -bamboo neckpiece  2011 - oxidised copper, enamel, kimono, gold plated steel cable - long 80cm (DETAIL)Mariko Sumioka -bamboo neckpiece  2011 – oxidised copper, enamel, kimono, gold plated steel cable – long 80cm (DETAIL)
Mariko Sumioka, work inspired by the architecture of her native Japan - the "tea house" series Mariko Sumioka, work inspired by the architecture of her native Japan – the « tea house » series rings
Mariko Sumioka -architectural rings 2011Mariko Sumioka -architectural rings 2011
Mariko Sumioka - bamboo earrings  2011Mariko Sumioka – bamboo earrings  2011

01/12/2012

EXPO ‘UNEXPECTED PLEASURES’ – Design Museum, London (UK) – 5 Dec. 2012–3 Mars 2013

Classé dans : BOOKS / BIBLIO,Exposition/Exhibition,Grande-Bretagne (UK),MUSEE — bijoucontemporain @ 0:03

UNEXPECTED PLEASURES

The Art and Design of Contemporary Jewellery

A Design Museum, London touring exhibition

unexpected-pleasures-0.jpg

Bringing together almost 200 objects from around the world, Unexpected Pleasures celebrates the work of contemporary jewellers who have challenged the conventions of jewellery design.

Curated by jewellery designer and maker Dr. Susan Cohn, the exhibition offers a survey of contemporary jewellery presented through a number of themes: Worn Out – celebrating the experience of wearing jewellery, Linking Links – looking at the ways in which meaning and narratives are expressed in jewellery and A Fine Line – offering insights into the origins of contemporary jewellery today, highlighting key instigators of the contemporary jewellery movement.

The exhibition will feature prominent UK and international jewellers including Wendy Ramshaw, renowned for her complex geometric designs, Hans Stofer’s intricate wire form jewellery, Gijs Bakker’s conceptual adornments and delicate abstract pieces by Dorothea Pruhl.

« UNEXPECTED Pleasures, an exhibition of the world’s ugliest, loveliest, most intriguing contemporary jewellery, opened at the National Gallery of Victoria International yesterday.
 »Everything here is designed to be worn, » said guest curator and jewellery designer Susan Cohn.
Visitors took that as a challenge, moving through 180 dimly lit curiosities by the world’s most radical designers, trying to imagine what it would be like to wear a necklace of glass and ceramic dildos. Or a tubular  »veil » collar like a pearly plastic version of Ned Kelly’s helmet. Or a cluster of rusted bolts and nails on a silver  »Screw Ring ».
»After procreation and survival, our next instinct as humans is adornment, » Cohn said when asked,  »Why? »
 »Adornment is about attracting a mate, which in turn, is about procreation and survival. »
Some humans, however, obviously require more complex, intellectual adornments than others.  »Yes, some wearers will want something that speaks that way for them, » Cohn said. Among the exhibits was a vast choice of such expression, from the minimalist exquisitry of a grey sunray-pleated yoke, to a clump of small pale  »tumours », photographed bursting through a model’s frock. The latter was in a category of radical ideas.
NGV director Gerard Vaughan said the exhibition offered  »a fresh view of the many meanings associated with jewellery ».
The visiting director of London’s Design Museum, Deyan Sudjic, said it was the result of a  »long, drawn-out, cerebral process », and that is precisely how it felt.
Unexpected Pleasures: The Art and Design of Contemporary Jewellery, is a Design Museum, London, exhibition funded by the Joan and Peter Clemenger Trust.
It is free and runs until August 26, when it will travel to London. (Daily Life.com.au)

 

MEGA,  2009
Camilla Prasch – MEGA 2009 – red dyed snap fasteners, nylon thread, silicone discs – Photo: Dorte Krogh
Lauren Kalman, Hard Wear (Oral Rims), 2006, Electroformed mold with gold plating

Doug Bucci, USA, Trans-Hematopoietic neckpiece (2010).Doug Bucci, USA, Trans-Hematopoietic neckpiece (2010).

Susie Ganch, USA, Yellow dust, brooch (2010).Susie Ganch, USA, Yellow dust, brooch (2010)

Unexpected pleasures exhibition.David Bielander, Scampi, armband/bracelet, 2007

Unexpected pleasures exhibition.Karl Fritsch Screw ring 2010 silver, nails, screws

 

Karl Fritsch, New Zealand, Steinhaufen, ring 2004.Karl Fritsch, New Zealand, Steinhaufen, ring 2004

Unexpected pleasures exhibition.Hyewon Kim -  Torn 1 (2011) – resin, twigs Photo: Myoungwook Huh

Unexpected Pleasures exhibition
Tiffany Parbs – Extension (2008) – hand woven hair, digital print – photo Terence Bogue
Caroline Broadhead, England, Veil, necklace (1983).
Caroline Broadhead, England, Veil, necklace (1983).
Susanne Klemm, Frozen, necklace, plasticSusanne Klemm, « Frozen » necklace, plastic

Blanche Tilden  Speed, neckpiece  2000  borosilicate glass, titanium, anodised aluminium  1.2 x 24.0 cm  Collection of the artistBlanche TILDEN – Speed, neckpiece  2000  borosilicate glass, titanium, anodised aluminium

Paul Derrez  Pleated Collar  1982  Plastic, steel  Collection of Paul DerrezPaul Derrez  Pleated Collar  1982  Plastic, steel 

Felieke van der Leest - necklace Felieke van der Leest – necklace

Rose by Gijs Bakker: Colour photograph in laminated plastic (1983)    http://egetal.com.au/static/files/assets/7ab4f2ba/Image_1_news.jpgGijs Bakker Rose necklace – Colour photograph in laminated plastic (1983) 

Dorothea Prühl - Habicht (Hawk), 2006 necklace, elm wood - H 40 cm Dorothea Prühl Habicht (Hawk), 2006 necklace, elm wood – H 40 cm

Noon Passama, Brooch, 2010Noon Passama, Brooch, 2010

 

First on show at the National Gallery of Victoria, Melbourne, 20 April – 26 August 2012, this exhibition will also tour to the Design Museum in London, 5 Dec 2012 – 3 Mar 2013. Melbourne based designer and maker Dr. Susan Cohn (interview with The Age) has curated this exhibition for the Design Museum and is also co-author of the substantial catalogue documenting this event as well contributing to the discussion about contemporary design and making.

 

 

VIDEO

 

Design Museum
28 Shad Thames
London SE1 2YD
Programme 020 7940 8790
Office 020 7403 6933
Fax 0207 378 6540info@designmuseum.org

OPENING HOURS

Daily 10am – 5.45pm
Last admission 5.15pm

 

BOOK :

EXPO ‘UNEXPECTED PLEASURES’ – Design Museum, London (UK) - 5 Dec. 2012–3 Mars 2013 dans BOOKS / BIBLIO Unexpected-Pleasures-634
exhibition catalog -  Unexpected Pleasures – By Design Museum edited by Susan Cohn, 2012
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