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25/04/2017

AUTOR Contemporary Jewelry Fair – Grand Hotel du Boulevard, Bucarest (Romania) – 13-14 May 2017

AUTOR 2017

ready for its 16th edition ! May 13-14,  Grand Hotel du Boulevard, Bucharest. Come discover the emerging talents of contemporary jewelry.

Out of the 190 applications received for the 2017 editionn, our jury selected 90 artists to be discovered during our international fair
AUTOR 2017
 
AUTOR <3 community. AUTOR takes its 8 years mission further by shaping the contemporary jewelry community. We connect artists with passionate jewelry lovers, collectors, international galleries, distributors or specialised media. The 2017 jury includes Sofia Björkman – Jewellery artist and Founder of Gallery Platina in Stockholm Doris Maninger – Director of Alchimia Jewelry School in Florence, Lucia Massei – Director of Alchimia Jewelry School in Florence, Ruudt Peters – Artist, Professor Opere Summer School in The Netherlands, Paulo Ribeiro – Founder and Director of Joya Barcelona, Dan Pierșinaru – Founder and Director of Autor. This spring we launch the 4th issue of AUTOR – the contemporary art magazine, one more reason to be there!
 CRUSHED by Andra Lupu, Romania - AUTOR 2017CRUSHED by Andra Oana Lupu, Romania
« A celebration of fragility, life and feelings in a beautiful brooch.
”Crushed is what you feel when something beautiful is ending, crushed is how you feel when you lose someone dear. But every ending is a new beginning, it’s up to you how you start over, or whether if you take the good or the bad of every experience. In my new collection, I use thin layers of « crushed » melted silver, to create a jewelry as a metaphor to the fragility of life, relationships, feelings”. »
 Tubular Collection by Ana Pina, Portugal - AUTOR 2017Tubular Collection by Ana Pina, Portugal
« Ana’s jewelries celebrate multiple possibilities using geometrical wiseness. To infinity and back!
”The Tubular Collection combines round wires and tubes in a subtle way, creating both minimalist and statement pieces that aim to celebrate pure geometric lines and its multiple possibilities of combination. The rationality of orthogonal alignments is challenged by the mutable character of movement and by the seeming idea that the connections between the different elements are fragile and unpredictable, which accentuates the sense that any combination is possible – from the simplest isolated element to infinity” »
16psyche Collection by Anna Börcsök, Hungary  16psyche Collection by Anna Börcsök,  Hungary 
« Can a jewelry collection be an exclamation sign? Anna’s answer is yes.
”The jewelry and the wearer should be inseparable. Without them we are naked and helpless. These pieces are fractal based Armours and they determinate the movement and actions of the wearer’s position. I was studying the Ancient societies and examining the current social models to get a predictable image of the future. The collection is an exclamation point, an invitation to face our own limitations”. »
Second Shape by Giulia Boccafogli fashion jewelry, Italy - AUTOR 2017Second Shape by Giulia Boccafogli fashion jewelry, Italy
« The forgotten becomes unforgettable.
”Second Shape is a second chance for the material to be used in a different way and also a second chance for my jewelry to become something different: an ornament or almost a dress. I like the idea that a ruin could be such a great source of beauty and this is the reason why I tried to explore a different way to work the “forgotten” leather: a super clean and modern material that can be worked in an apparent rough way” »
Night Writing by Letiția Pintlie, RomâniaNight Writing by Letitia Pintilie, România
« The sensory jewelry.
”Vision, our dominant sense, allows us to perceive the world through images, motion and colour. We use the information received from it to recognise and interact with objects and environments, interpret spatial cues. When impaired, one way of assisting it is by supplementing information through other means, like tactile. I translated this into the collection by constructing the pieces on elements that address both the vision and the touch” »
 Alien Flowers by Gülnur Özdağlar/ tertium non data, Turkey Alien Flowers by Gülnur Özdağlar/ tertium non data, Turkey
« Exploring new horizons of beauty  ”This collection is a search for creating deep sea corals and tropic flowers of another planet” »
 Necklace series by Magali Thibault Gobeil Joaillière, CanadaNecklace series by Magali Thibault Gobeil Joaillière, Canada
«  »SOMEBODY GOT CRAZY WITH THE CANDY MACHINE »
Lost in my imaginary world where everything is so delightful. That little place inside myself where everything is calm, joyful and pretty. Where my mind goes when everything is so hard outside, in the real world. These crazy forms of nature made from artificial materials are the result of that retreating into that special world that protects myself from not going crazy in the real world. They touch all our senses. We want to eat them as if they were candies, to touch them because of their appearance so smooth, spongy and colourful We all need that little break to full our body with a bit of joy. »"
AUTOR 2017 Sandra Tepla Jewellery, Czech Republic: Atomic Visions by Sandra Tepla Jewellery, Czech Republic
« Jewelry stand for a vision of future.
”Atomic Visions: Human Impulse is about futuristic textile structures, exploring empowerment/dominance in a pre-apocalyptic ‘rise before the fall’. My infatuation with textile cord has enabled me to create large scale work of colours previously unknown to me. It is this ‘WHY NOT?’ attitude that does the trick; often producing the most striking creations” »
 About Colour/ (Im)movable Collection by Konstanze Prechtl, Austria - AUTOR 2017About Colour/ (Im)movable Collection by Konstanze Prechtl, Austria
« Colour sets us free
« I use a range of colours derived from my personal life and surroundings which are applied in different ways to various materials. Depending on the line of sight, the viewer and wearer discover different colour schemes. The series “(Im)movable” reflects on Movement and Restraint – Freedom and Restriction. Although each joint is movable, they are restricting and limiting each other”. »
 REflections Collection by Kapka Jewelry, Macedonia  - AUTOR 2017REflections Collection by Jana Acevska/Kapka Jewelry, Macedonia
« Jewelry speaks for today.
“Jewels as reflection of our internality are containing stories of the present, but also past, transmitted through generations. Relating the traditional with the contemporary is an endeavour to generate new stories, unique and specific, which is the idea behind the Reflections, new KAPKA jewelry collection”. »
 Lamella Collection by Veronika Fazekas, Hungary - Playing with magic. - AUTOR 2017Lamella Collection by Veronika Fazekas, Hungary - Playing with magic. - AUTOR 2017
 Lamella Collection by Veronika Fazekas, Hungary – Playing with magic.
« With these pieces my aim was to make a setting in a ’magical way’, using optical illusion and the help of the light. To see the settled lens, you need light which reflects it into your eyes. I could reach this with the help of lamellar structures.” »
Identity by Franziska Höhne, Germany - A non-gender jewelry.Identity by Franziska Höhne, Germany – A non-gender jewelry.
« ”The collection sharpens the senses to become more sensitive in dealing with each other. It encourages thinking beyond simple categories so everyone can become aware of their own identity and develop it freely without constant external conditioning. There are no obvious gender markers in the collection. Each person can decide for themselves how the jewelry is worn, giving hints of one‘s own identity or masking it” »
Colorful Emptiness by Adriana Díaz, Colombia/SpainColorful Emptiness by Adriana Díaz, Colombia/Spain
« A piece of jewelry to remind us how time flies. Each and every moment. ”These pieces are small receptacles that actually contain nothing except a patina that is evocative of the passing of time. They are like rusty cans that have been abandoned in some forgotten corner, exposed to the elements and disuse” »
Balloon bracelet + Silver earrings by Tengely Nóra Jewelry, HungaryBalloon bracelet + Silver earrings by Tengely Nóra Jewelry, Hungary
« Playing with balloons and chain lines to find new balances.
”My jewelries are made of sterling silver with the technic of rigidified chains. Each link is soldered one by one. The balloon collection was made to find a new closure method. The bracelets consist two flat separated parts and the balloons press them together – they are the lock of the two parts”« 
 Deforested by Mona Velciov Monotip, Romania Deforested by  Mona Velciov Monotip , Romania
  Mona Velciov,  Her collection for AUTOR 16 is dedicated to transforming protest into a powerful aesthetic statement.
”Due to the last 20 years of vast illegal logging, both by private companies and the government, hundreds of thousands of hectares of Romanian forests, one of Europe’s last virgin forests, were deforested. This body of work is a protest and a confession: of the pain these actions are causing to the forests that it is also my pain”.
AUTOR 2017 - Girls in Red by Diederick van Hövell, Belgium: Girls in Red by Diederick Van Hovell, Belgium
 » What color is your mood? “With the contemporary jewel as a medium, I search, with detours, a specific color to translate a mood, a technique to express a touching feeling, to transpose emotions. A portrait, a jewel, a thought – as a testimony of an interest in the individual, as an evocation of the distinctive signs, to learn about the intersecting identities of each other. This is my subject matter”.:

Earth's four elements -  Bracelets by Isabel Sabato Argentina Earth’s four elements -  Bracelets by Isabel Sabato Argentina

Fractured Bracelet by Kyri Hinkleman, USAFractured Bracelet by Kyri Hinkleman, USA
”Working with found objects, I am interested in taking the previous inferred meanings of materials and changing the context to represent a new experience. Discarded metal, found threads, forgotten hardware and even seemingly useless care tags are things that often go unnoticed. Through my work, I intend to rediscover and represent these findings through a fresh outlook”.
Tidal Surge by Heather McDermott Jewellery, ScotlandTidal Surge by Heather McDermott Jewellery, Scotland
« ”Unconventional in size and structure, each piece is an expression of sculptural form and is designed to create a statement. The continually changing shoreline is my constant source of inspiration and my collection is the contemporary interpretation of these surroundings. Stainless steel and silver wire is hand formed into soft geometric shapes mimicking fishing nets and lobster pots” »

 Framing the Unframeable by Letizia Maggio jewelry, Italy Framing the Unframeable by Letizia Maggio jewelry, Italy

 The Morning After by Shiran Shashua, Israel The Morning After by Shiran Shashua, Israel
”In this collection, I used paper as a main element giving it high value by setting it in a jewel. Using two different materials with different properties side by side. My inspirations comes from maps, latitude and longitude, compasses, arrows and signs”
 Past, loss, future by Christine Jalio, Finland - Exploring emotions Past, loss, future by Christine Jalio, Finland – Exploring emotions
”The collection shows that I am intrigued by asceticism, old age and sensitivity. The pieces have a sense of comfort and safety to them and look very heavy, but are very light. I am extremely fascinated by the human psyche and the emotions and reactions that are part of it. In my work I want to study the human life span and the transitions, choices and turning points of life”

AUTOR 2017 - Noha Nicolescu - Little Blue, ring, wood, silver 'I am a sky where spirits live. Stare into this deepening blue, while the breeze says a secret.' Rumi #autorfair: Noha Nicolescu – Little Blue, ring, wood, silver
‘I am a sky where spirits live. Stare into this deepening blue, while the breeze says a secret.’ Rumi

WEK, Portugal ★  “It's all about playing! Connecting long necklaces, matching colours. Join as much as you want! Play collection is focus on the lock, the main piece of the necklace. Thought to be more than functional, the lock means singularity, irreverence, the importance of details”.WEK, Portugal ★
“It’s all about playing! Connecting long necklaces, matching colours. Join as much as you want! Play collection is focus on the lock, the main piece of the necklace. Thought to be more than functional, the lock means singularity, irreverence, the importance of details”.

 Ana Barbu Uzura , RomâniaAna Barbu Uzura , România
”As more as I get closer to plants and nature and work with them, I feel like a more powerful concept is taking over in this approach, the awareness of fragility of life, and for that to be more obvious I need to leave my plants more to hazard. In order to do that I have this new way, more voluptuous, of exhibiting dying organic matter, just by putting it into small protective exoskeletons made of precious metals or under thin glass”.

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AUTOR 2017 with mydaybyday gallery
Mia Maljojoki, Noelia Macchi , Tal Barash Efraim with myday-byday Gallery in Rome selected at the Autor Fair 2017 !!
 
 
 Grand Hotel du Boulevard, Bucharest
Bulevardul Regina Elisabeta 5, București, Roumanie
Téléphone : +40 21 210 2363
hello@dautor.ro

 

09/03/2017

#MunichJewelleryWeek2017 – EXPO (37) – « Duality of Presence » – Super+Centercourt Gallery, Munich (DE) – 8-14 Mars 2017

(37)  « Duality of Presence« 

Opening Reception: March 8, 6pm

runs 08.03–14.03

Duality of Presence, is a curatorial collaboration between American Professors of Jewelry/Metalsmithing Kerianne Quick and Jess Tolbert.
The exhibition brings together contemporary jewelers and metalsmiths working in the United States, who use specific material and form to tell stories about place, histories, and conveyance.

(37) Duality of Presence

dualityofpresence  takes an explicit look at a generation of American contemporary makers united by the urge to connect to things and the world. As we grapple with the legacy of [alternative] material use in art jewelry in the age of globalization – we are united in the urgency our works express to identify with and bring insight to what it means to be in the world now. This exhibition was born from a noticeable shared concern and strategy expressed in the work of curators, colleagues, and other makers in the field. Within the field of contemporary art jewelry many reject or limit the use of precious materials associated with conventional jewelry in favor of non-traditional materials, focusing on a formal expression that may be conceptual in some way, or simply aesthetic. However some contemporary practitioners, including the artists in this exhibition, are mining material – calling upon origins, sourcing, histories, and/or supply chain information to embed value into the materials they select and use. This excavation is a powerful tool for authenticating and enhancing their underlying concepts. 

Recognizing this shared methodology as an important movement in American contemporary art jewelry and metalsmithing, Duality of Presence defines and explores those engaged with ‘material specificity’ in their making. We position the term ‘material specificity’ as a way of looking towards how material communicates complex and distinct narratives. Thinking of materials as active agents in the creation of meaning pushes past the notion that they are meaningless conduits and asserts a more substantive role; as conveyors of information, bearers of histories, and assemblers of discourses. Material Specific Artists enter into a deliberate collaboration and cooperative act with materials in the pursuit of meaning.

 Duality of Presence *

Jina Seo - Super + Centercourt Gallery  « @dualityofpresence during the Munich Jewellery Week 2017. Some of my experimental pieces that push the boundary of jewelry and clothing are in the show « 
Jina SEO  (EXCHANGE-BIJOU 1)

Jina SEO -Holes_detail5 - "The fragments of ordinary clothes convey a tactile and erotic interaction, emphasizing the physical movements between certain parts of body and garments."  — Jina Seo: Jina SEO – Holes_detail5

 Jina Seo - The fragments of ordinary clothes convey a tactile and erotic interaction,  emphasizing the physical movements between certain parts of body and  garments."  — Jina Seo: Jina SEO - Holes_detail

SCHMUCK 2017 - DOP  (dualityofpresence) -  Jina SEO:  Jina SEO – HOLES -
«  »The fragments of ordinary clothes convey a tactile and erotic interaction, emphasizing the physical movements between certain parts of body and garments. »

DOP Duality of Presence Exhibition (@dualityofpresence) - Jina Seo "HOLES": Jina Seo « HOLES »

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Participating Artists :  Jessica Andersen – Lynn Batchelder – Thea ClarkNikki Couppee – Motoko Furuhashi – Steven Gordon Holman – Alexandra HoppMasumi Kataoka –  Joshua Kosker – Tova Lund – Sharon Massey – Jaydan Moore – Wei Lah Poh –  Kerianne Quick (Curator) — Kaiya Rainbolt – Yumi Janairo Roth –  Jina Seo – Jess Tolbert (Curator) — Demitra Ryan-Thomloudis

DOP  (dualityofpresence) -  Alexandra Hopp tagneckAlexandra Hopp –  tagneck.  « I use the traditional jewelry forms, techniques, materials, and visual vocabulary of the goldsmith, in purposeful profusion so the original function is lost, resulting in an exercise in mania. » DOP  (dualityofpresence)  -  Alexandra Hopp  Bibliomania: Alexandra HoppBibliomania necklace

 Joshua Kosker _hiding-in-the-flesh - How do objects shape experiences and, in turn, how can actions imprint meaning on the material world?"  —:  Joshua Kosker – hiding-in-the-flesh – « How do objects shape experiences and, in turn, how can actions imprint meaning on the material world? »

 Joshua Kosker _nestle - How do objects shape experiences and, in turn, how can actions imprint meaning on the material world?"  —:  Joshua Kosker _ nestle

Joshua Kosker _embed. - Utopia towels - How do objects shape experiences and, in turn, how can actions imprint meaning on the material world?" DOP (dualityofpresence) - kosker_embed_detail. - How do objects shape experiences and, in turn, how can actions imprint meaning on the material world?"  —  Joshua Kosker:

Joshua Kosker _embed. – Utopia towels

DOP (dualityofpresence) -  Thea Clark - Head of Franz Joseph Fiord:  Thea Clark - « Head of Franz Joseph Fiord »

 "The layers build with the resonance of color, texture, and material choices, allowing the pieces to pay homage to the natural wonder of the Arctic."  — Thea Clark: Thea Clark  « The layers build with the resonance of color, texture, and material choices, allowing the pieces to pay homage to the natural wonder of the Arctic. » 

Kerianne Quick- Transmutations_1. - "This work is based on the human urge to collect, to mark occasions with tangible objects, and an objects ability to connect us to history and memory." Kerianne Quick- Transmutations_1. – « This work is based on the human urge to collect, to mark occasions with tangible objects, and an objects ability to connect us to history and memory. »

Kerianne Quick  Transmutations - "This work is based on the human urge to collect, to mark occasions with tangible objects, and an objects ability to connect us to history and memory."  Kerianne Quick - Transmutations

Wei Lah Poh-  White Handle, necklace. -  "Handle draws upon enamelware’s visible record of use; it’s degraded and chipped edges, as well as the beautiful patina of rust on steel." Wei Lah Poh-  White Handle, necklace. -  « Handle draws upon enamelware’s visible record of use; it’s degraded and chipped edges, as well as the beautiful patina of rust on steel. »

Wei Lah Poh -  White Cup Wounded, bracelet with cup. -    "Handle draws upon enamelware’s visible record of use; it’s degraded and chipped edges, as well as the beautiful patina of rust on steel."  Wei Lah Poh -  White Cup Wounded, bracelet with cup

Kaiya Rainbolt -  Mattress#1 (Fear) - How can we respond to issues that are challenging and not succumb to the  urge to reject those that are painful to us?"  Kaiya Rainbolt -  Mattress#1 (Fear) – How can we respond to issues that are challenging and not succumb to the  urge to reject those that are painful to us? » 

Kaiya Rainbolt -  Confusion. -   "How can we respond to issues that are challenging and not succumb to the urge to reject those that are painful to us?"  — Kaiya Rainbolt: Kaiya Rainbolt -  Confusion

DoP  (dualityofpresence)   Kaiya Rainbolt's Violation #1  Kaiya Rainbolt‘s Violation #1

 Lynn Batchelder, How to Build a House:  Lynn Batchelder, How to Build a House

Demitra Thomloudis  "As jewelry, these intimate objects coexist with the body as a means to connect with the landscape from afar." Demitra Thomloudis  Over the Wall’ a series of 90 brooches inspired by the cross boarder view – El Paso to Ciudad Juarez’s Anapra neighborhood. Cement, brass, steel paint, graphite pencil. – « As jewelry, these intimate objects coexist with the body as a means to connect with the landscape from afar. »

  Demitra Thomloudis 'Over the Wall' a series of 90 brooches inspired by the cross boarder view - El Paso to Ciudad Juarez's Anapra neighborhood. Cement, brass, steel paint, graphite pencil.  Demitra Thomloudis ‘Over the Wall’ a series of 90 brooches inspired by the cross boarder view – El Paso to Ciudad Juarez’s Anapra neighborhood. Cement, brass, steel paint, graphite pencil.

Demitra Thomloudis - "As jewelry, these intimate objects coexist with the body as a means to connect with the landscape from afar."  —: Demitra Thomloudis  ‘Over the Wall’ a series of 90 brooches inspired by the cross boarder view – El Paso to Ciudad Juarez’s Anapra neighborhood. Cement, brass, steel paint, graphite pencil.

  Motoko Furuhashi mesilla_fromt -  I  "I am fascinated by the natural cycle of growth, decay, and death – and the complexity of the processes that govern life between one place and the next."  —: Motoko Furuhashi - mesilla_fromt -  I  « I am fascinated by the natural cycle of growth, decay, and death – and the complexity of the processes that govern life between one place and the next. »

Steven Gordon Holman - Stone Rabbit Neckpiece. - "The Tribe was born out of the West Desert and contemporary hunting culture; its shaman the rabbit and its oracle the magpie." Steven Gordon Holman – Stone Rabbit Neckpiece. – « The Tribe was born out of the West Desert and contemporary hunting culture; its shaman the rabbit and its oracle the magpie. »

Steven Gordon Holman -  Black Totem Neckpiece-  "The Tribe was born out of the West Desert and contemporary hunting culture; its shaman the rabbit and its oracle the magpie."  —: Steven Gordon Holman -  Black Totem Neckpiece

Nikki Couppee  corsageIV. brooch - "With the use of these everyday materials, I am able to exaggerate the size and abundance of gemstones to parody or poke fun at the socio-economic issues of class systems physically made manifest in the wearing of fine jewelry."  Nikki Couppee  corsageIV. brooch – « With the use of these everyday materials, I am able to exaggerate the size and abundance of gemstones to parody or poke fun at the socio-economic issues of class systems physically made manifest in the wearing of fine jewelry. » 

  Jessica  Anderson - "By presenting refuse in the intimate and personal format of jewelry, I ask the viewer to reflect upon their relationships to objects and things."   Jessica  Anderson – « By presenting refuse in the intimate and personal format of jewelry, I ask the viewer to reflect upon their relationships to objects and things. »

  Deposit1 Jessica Anderson - "By presenting refuse in the intimate and personal format of jewelry, I ask the viewer to reflect upon their relationships to objects and things."  —:  Deposit1 Jessica Anderson

 Tova Lund -  "This work explores my physical and psychological relationship to landscape and place.":  Tova Lund -  « This work explores my physical and psychological relationship to landscape and place. »

 Tova Lund's - Here and There   Tova Lund‘s – Here and There 

 Sharon Massey  Brickwork X necklace .     "My work is inspired by the post-industrial landscape of Pittsburgh and surrounding areas. Through use of both labor and materials I pay homage to the region’s blue-collar past.":  Sharon Massey  – Brickwork – X necklace –   « My work is inspired by the post-industrial landscape of Pittsburgh and surrounding areas. Through use of both labor and materials I pay homage to the region’s blue-collar past. »

 Sharon Massey  Brickwork_Necklace - "My work is inspired by the post-industrial landscape of Pittsburgh and surrounding areas. Through use of both labor and materials I pay homage to the region’s blue-collar past."  —:  Sharon Massey  Brickwork_Necklace

DOP - Masumi Kataoka: Masumi Kataoka

Masumi Kataoka - DOP: Masumi Kataoka « I am interested in what jewelry can do. »

 Yumi Roth - Barbed_Wire_Ov. - "I explore immigration, hybridity, and displacement through discrete objects, site-responsive installations, solo projects, and collaborations."   — Yumi Janairo Roth: Yumi Roth – Barbed_Wire_Ov. – « I explore immigration, hybridity, and displacement through discrete objects, site-responsive installations, solo projects, and collaborations. »

DOP - Jess Tolbert _willowful2: Jess Tolbert – willowful2 – « I am interested in the ability objects hold – to connect people to individual and collective experiences, whether meaningful, evocative, or mundane. »

Jess Tolbert - willowful4 - "I am interested in the ability objects hold - to connect people to individual and collective experiences, whether meaningful, evocative, or mundane."   — Jess Tolbert: Jess Tolbert - willowful4

 Duality of Presence defines and explores ‘material specificity’ as a movement in American contemporary art jewellery and metalsmithing where artists aim to reveal hidden narratives through the use of specific materials. The works emphasize the importance of maker-viewer communication, by demonstrating the effectiveness of material centered conveyance, where artists tell stories that connect to the wider world. The works demonstrate a broad range of subject matter, with material specificity as the common thread. In addition to the physical display of objects, the exhibition will include two interactive digital components, a innovative use of virtual reality and an interactive website. Virtual reality headsets integrated into the gallery display will show VR videos produced by selected participating artists using a virtual reality multi-lens camera. Each video will transport the viewer from the gallery to a significant site or moment chosen and filmed by the artist.

 

 

 

Super+Centercourt Gallery
Adalbertstrtraße 44
80799 Munich
Wed-Tue 11:00–17:00

 

Enregistrer

09/12/2016

EXPO ‘New Tastes – Twelve New Graduates’ – Kath Libbert Jewellery Gallery (UK) – 10 Nov. 2016–29 Janv. 2017

New Tastes


Twelve New Graduates

 New Tastes Twelve New Graduates - kath libbert jewellery gallery- 10th Nov - 29th Jan 2017Darcey Skelly,  Space Cows From Space)

 Twelve New Graduates
Delectable jewellery, metalwork and silversmithing! Our annual pick of the most delicious new talents selected from all across the UK and Ireland!

Kath Libbert Jewellery Gallery, which this year celebrates twenty years at Salts Mill, Saltaire, has selected and exhibited the work of new graduates since its inception. In numerous cases these emerging talents have gone on to gain wide acclaim for their work, and many continue to be represented by the gallery. For the exhibition New Tastes Kath serves up twelve sumptuous collections cooked up by new graduates from all over the UK and Ireland:  ‘Spotting and then supporting the work of cutting edge new graduates has always been extremely central to the ethos of the gallery.  Forging a career straight out of college is really challenging. Now, more than ever, it is vital to exhibit and encourage these incredibly talented jewellers and metalsmiths at this formative stage in their careers.’

 
Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art -
Rob Anderson, Sheffield Hallam University - already a winner, bagging the prestigious 2016 Business Design Centre New Designer of the Year Award for his Japanese ceramic inspired ‘family’ of earthy steel vessels entitled ‘Heavy Hands’. Their meditative beauty arises from his carefully considered making process – a wonderfully tactile collection with great presence.
Hayley Brooks, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee -
Chen Cheng, Birmingham School of Jewellery -
Sheng Zhang, Birmingham School of Jewellery

Room for more?

We are also delighted to serve up collections byFrancesca Lobb, Manchester School of Art; Felicity Lynden, University of Edinburgh;  Freya Alder, Glasgow School of Art; Stephanie O Leary, Middlesex University, London; Michaela Murrain, De Montfort University, Leicester, and Amanda Denison, Winchester School of Art.

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Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art‘Go with the Glow’ is a taste explosion – sensual, soft to the touch jewels, in a riot of fluorescent UV reactive nylon wire, inspired by raves, laser light shows, and jellyfish!
« My jewellery is focused on exploring the multisensory experience and making tactile wearable pieces, which involve different sensory experiences such as vision, sound, and touch. The inspiration for the jewellery series “Go with the Glow” stems from capturing the moving moments in the natural world. I was deeply attracted by free-swimming marine animal. For example jellyfish, which is soft, light, and glowing with the characteristics of amazing colours. I was also fascinated by dancing, rave party and laser light show.
I developed my work by experimenting with acrylic, moving beads, UV reactive nylon wire, UV light and fluorescent paints resulting in light-weighted tactile, colourful and playful pieces. The nylon wires under UV light creates an amazing fluorescent effect and provide a pleasant visual enjoyment for the wearers and viewers. Moreover, the pieces create subtle sounds, following freely with the movements of the body. »

Education
2009-2013 | BA Jewellery and Silversmithing College of Art and Design, Beijing University of Technology
2014-2016 | MFA Jewellery and Silversmithing  Edinburgh College of Art

Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art - ‘Go with the Glow’- bangle in acrylic, seed beads, fluorescent plastic tube and nylon wire. Photo by Shannon Tofts  Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art – ‘Go with the Glow’- bangle in acrylic, seed beads, fluorescent plastic tube and nylon wire. Photo by Shannon Tofts 

Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art - ‘Go with the Glow’- brooch in acrylic, seed beads, fluorescent plastic tube and nylon wire. Photo by Shannon Tofts Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art - ‘Go with the Glow’- brooch in acrylic, seed beads, fluorescent plastic tube and nylon wire. Photo by Shannon Tofts

Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art - ‘Go with the Glow’- pendant in acrylic, seed beads, fluorescent plastic tube and nylon wire. Photo by Shannon Tofts  Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art - ‘Go with the Glow’- pendant in acrylic, seed beads, fluorescent plastic tube and nylon wire. Photo by Shannon Tofts 

Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art - ‘Go with the Glow’- ring in acrylic, seed beads, fluorescent plastic tube and nylon wire. Photo by Shannon Tofts   Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art – ‘Go with the Glow’- ring in acrylic, seed beads, fluorescent plastic tube and nylon wire. Photo by Shannon Tofts 

Amanda Denison, Winchester School of Art
« I am inspired and intrigued by the traces left behind through dilapidation and decay and by the marks stamped on the urban environment.  And I am drawn to repeated elements that distort and change. 
I have a fine art background and this influences my approach to jewellery making. I live and work in West London and take numerous photographs of the details I discover as I walk the streets. These are incorporated into my work through mark making and drawings on my enameled surfaces.
I enjoy the challenge of working with industrial materials and traditional processes to create distinctive hand made art Jewellery. I like to work with steel and to add silver accents. I incorporate enamels and patinas to add colour but my palette is subtle and restrained. After kiln firing my enamels are deconstructed and the shiny finish is abraded. This creates richly degraded surfaces with subtle areas of hue and tone and a smooth matt finish. Where patches of bare steel are revealed they are encouraged to rust.  Each piece is unique for although I can repeat the processes there is always an element of chance and no two pieces are ever exactly the same. »

Amanda Denison, Winchester School of Art. - Enamelled steel necklace on silver chain  -  : Amanda Denison, Winchester School of Art. – Enamelled steel necklace on silver chain

Amanda Denison, Winchester School of Art - Double enamelled steel brooch -  .: Amanda Denison, Winchester School of Art – Double enamelled steel brooch

 

Michaela Murrain, De Montfort University, Leicester
« My work is all about colour, shape and repetition. The idea of taking plain white, flat pieces of fabric and manipulating them to create wearable sculpture is what excites me as a maker. I am inspired by the bold characteristics of neck adornment within African culture and from this I created my ‘Chunk and Loop’ jewellery collection where I have translated subtle elements, such as the placement of colour and scale, to create tactile, vibrant yet sophisticated, contemporary wearables. »

Michaela Murrain, De Montfort University, Leicester - ‘Chunk and Loop’ necklace in hand dyed cotton Michaela Murrain, De Montfort University, Leicester – ‘Chunk and Loop’ necklace in hand dyed cotton

 

Stephanie O Leary, Middlesex University, London
« Drawn to the simplicity and elegance of clean lines in architectural design, Stephanie O’Leary is influenced by geometric structures which jut-out, protrude or extend from the existing ‘frame’ of their environment. Specifically scaffolding, cranes and power lines.
Scaffolding: “a temporary structure used to support the construction, maintenance and repair of buildings”.
What some may perceive as a temporary ugliness protruding out of the natural urban environment; she is drawn to its linear design, the contrast between permanence and degradation, and the transient nature of its construction.
Formed from various different components, scaffolding can be assembled in various different ways to integrate with and support a building; the structure can be assembled, disassembled, relocated and assembled again. In this sense, over time, the structure is in a constant state of flux, moving around the city.
By focussing on this dynamic, O’Leary uses universal hinges and industrial materials to create kinetic urban structures, which mimic the minimalist and fragmented aesthetic of London.
In combination with found objects, industrial and precious materials, O’Leary forms connections and links between discarded objects, material connotations and their environment in relation to urban cityscapes. »

Stephanie O Leary, Middlesex University, London - ‘Fragments’ – necklace in enamelled copper, steel, silver with fragment pieces encased in scaffolding inspired frames on articulated wooden chain  Stephanie O Leary, Middlesex University, London – ‘Fragments’ – necklace in enamelled copper, steel, silver with fragment pieces encased in scaffolding inspired frames on articulated wooden chain 

Stephanie O Leary, Middlesex University, London - ‘Roof Truss Brooch’ in wood, steel and brass  Stephanie O Leary, Middlesex University, London – ‘Roof Truss Brooch’ in wood, steel and brass 
  »Scaffolding: “a temporary structure used to support the construction, maintenance and repair of buildings”. « 

 

Chen Cheng, Birmingham School of Jewellery – inspired by ballet, Chen’s delightfully playful series of rings and brooches seem alive, dancing on the body – every element of her finely manipulated metal wire mini sculptures move as the wearer moves.
« Chen Cheng believes that contemporary jewellery is interactive because it demands a response, which can either be physical or emotional. Through kinetic movement and visual interaction, her work is designed to be explored.
“My pieces invoke play. Every element is movable, and this quality enhances the physical movement of the wearer”.
Combining her own aesthetic and working style, Chen has taken inspiration from shapes and moving modes found in the human body, which are also expressed through modern and traditional ballet dancing. Applying this motion to express the mystique and magical forms of the human body was the key determining process in her jewellery design.
Using fine wire and simple metal shapes to create the minimal forms allows the audiences to pay close attention to the movement of the work. Akin to dancing, each piece’s “performance” holds its own surprise in style and character.
Chen hopes that her work will encourage the wearers to touch, feel and discover the meaning behind her work. She hopes that through a deeper appreciation of such interaction, jewellery can be better understood and more people would be able to appreciate the different expressions and styles of contemporary jewellery. »

Dancing On My Own - kinetic ring -  Chen Cheng, Birmingham School of Jewellery;: Chen Cheng, Birmingham School of Jewellery – Dancing On My Own – kinetic ring

  "dancing on my own" kinetic ring -  Chen Cheng, Birmingham School of Jewellery;: Chen Cheng, Birmingham School of Jewellery – Dancing On My Own – kinetic ring

Chen Cheng - Dancing on my own kinetic broochChen Cheng, Birmingham School of Jewellery – Dancing On My Own – kinetic  brooch 

Chen Cheng (CN) - Dancing On My Own - kinetic ring - Chen Cheng, Birmingham School of Jewellery – Dancing On My Own – kinetic  ring

 

Francesca Lobb, Manchester School of Art
« Through the exploration of body adornment and personal possessions my practice primarily focusses around how an object evokes personal comfort for its owner. Through interrogation of pre-owned objects and our interaction with our personal belongings, my works emphasis is on the user’s experience. By observing these interactions I question how the design of an object can entice an individual to explore the piece and how this can provoke the wearer to form a personal attachment to the item.
Producing small scale objects with close attention to detail, I question how the user will interact with each piece. Creating intricate designs that evoke engagement, generates an individual narrative upon each item through the user’s choice of how it is worn.
Exploration of traditional techniques within jewellery and metal work is integral within my practice to produce individual handmade items, which also allows myself as a maker to form a personal connection to each piece throughout its creation. »

 Francesca Lobb, Manchester School of Art - ‘Watchmaker’s Brooch’ – from ‘Explore’ Collection.  Worn on the inside of the jacket to reflect the significance of the user's personal choice. Brass, chain, stainless steel and corked glass vials - Francesca Lobb, Manchester School of Art - ‘Watchmaker’s Brooch’ – from ‘Explore’ Collection.  Worn on the inside of the jacket to reflect the significance of the user’s personal choice. Brass, chain, stainless steel and corked glass vials

‘Watchmaker’s Brooch’ - from ‘Explore’ Collection in brass, chain, stainless steel and corked glass vials - ; Francesca Lobb, Manchester School of Art;: Francesca Lobb, Manchester School of Art - ‘Watchmaker’s Brooch’ - from ‘Explore’ Collection in brass, chain, stainless steel and corked glass vials

Francesca Lobb, Manchester School of Art - ‘Watchmaker’s Brooch’ – from ‘Explore’ Collection in brass, chain, stainless steel and corked glass vials 

 

Darcey Skelly, National College of Art and Design, Dublin‘Voyages of the Starship Stetson’ – a collision of two iconic fictional genres, Sci-Fi and the Western, paired in a crazy creation of her own imagining. Her concept, if the Cowboys of the Old West found a way to propel themselves into Space to colonise a planet. Darcey describes herself as ‘an illustrative maker’, a storyteller who aims to show there is more to a piece than meets the eye!

 Darcey Skelly, National College of Art and Design, Dublin  Space Cows From Space - Necklace   Darcey Skelly, National College of Art and Design, Dublin  Space Cows From Space – Necklace

Sheng Zhang, Birmingham School of Jewellery – winner of the New Designers Goldsmiths’ Company Silversmithing Award 2016  is influenced by minimalist art and contemporary architecture. Shafts of light slice through finely crafted incisions in his series of supremely elegant geometric brooches and vessels – all darkly oxidised with glinting gold edges.
« Sheng Zhang is influenced by minimalist art and inspired by contemporary architecture. His passion concentrates on the exploration and expression of the relationship between internal and external spaces with significant contrasting elements such as forms, textures and colours.
The collection involves the utilisation of highlighted incisions and openings to imply and emphasise the link of internal and external space, as well as introducing light as an indicator of different spaces to allow the viewer to look through and explore the entire piece. This also strengthens the visual response, captures attention and produces curiosity for the viewer.
By employing simple geometric forms and contrasting colours, Sheng demonstrates a minimal style and visual language, which reflects his personality, philosophy and personal aesthetic.
Each piece is unique as a result of a carefully controlled and purposely structured making process. All the pieces are hand made in metal with appropriate techniques including plating and oxidising. The collection consists of functional and non-functional items. »

Sheng Zhang, Birmingham School of Jewellery - ‘Inside Out’ – brooches in oxidised gilding metal Sheng Zhang, Birmingham School of Jewellery – ‘Inside Out’ – brooches in oxidised gilding metal

Sheng (Shawn) Zhang Brooch: Sheng Zhang Brooch – gilding metal, oxidising 2016

Felicity Lynden, University of Edinburgh - 'Ruins' necklace in resin embedded with iron oxide and steel mesh, with white metal and stainless wire Felicity Lynden, University of Edinburgh – ‘Ruins’ necklace in resin embedded with iron oxide and steel mesh, with white metal and stainless wire

 

Freya Alder, Glasgow School of Art
« I am a designer, maker and jeweller based in Glasgow. My work tends to be informal, relatively un-precious and playful. I recently graduated from the design school at Glasgow School of art specialising in silversmithing and jewellery.
This work originally sprang from my love of illustrating the female form. I enjoy the long linear lines that so quickly represent a woman. With something like five strokes of a pen one can conjure a form, and a character within that form.
The subject of the nude woman is fraught with conflicts. The female form is often reductively objectified and generally devalued. I want my work to have a humour and an informality that isn’t often afforded to the subject of the naked women or indeed the discipline of jewellery »

Freya Alder, Glasgow School of Art - Brass Ladies – brooches hand pierced in brass Freya Alder, Glasgow School of Art – Brass Ladies – brooches hand pierced in brass

Freya Alder, Glasgow School of Art - Brass Ladies – brooches hand pierced in brass - The subject of the nude woman is fraught with conflicts. The female form is often reductively objectified and generally devalued. I want my work to have a humour and an informality that isn't often afforded to the subject of the naked women or indeed the discipline of jewellery: Freya Alder, Glasgow School of Art – Brass Ladies – brooches hand pierced in brass – The subject of the nude woman is fraught with conflicts. The female form is often reductively objectified and generally devalued. I want my work to have a humour and an informality that isn’t often afforded to the subject of the naked women or indeed the discipline of jewellery

Hayley Brooks, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee - the peaceful expansive landscapes of the Scottish wilds are captured in her sensitive collection of chokers and bangles – microscopic details of lichen covered rocks appear in richly textured soft silicone contrasting with sleek silver – ‘a personal souvenir – enabling the wearer to carry with them something of the peace and solace found in the Scottish landscape.’
« The Scottish landscape provides peacefulness, an opportunity to free your mind, and access to silence. A stark contrast to the every day hustle and bustle of city life. Through photography I capture things that interest me ranging from the textures and details in the rocks found at my feet to the wider expansive landscapes that give us a sense of place. I am interested in the natural reflection of the landscape in the details of the rocks – the macroscopic in the microscopic!
Through this innovative collection of contemporary jewellery I aim to raise awareness of the beauty of the Scottish landscape, as I want other people see what I can see in the rocks and stones. These immensely wearable pieces, combine alternative materials such as silicone and precious metal, and also act as a personal souvenir – enabling the wearer to carry something of the peace and solace found in the Scottish landscape. »

Hayley Brooks, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee - Choker in silicone, anodised aluminium and silver -  Hayley Brooks, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee: -  Choker in silicone, anodised aluminium and silver -

Hayley Brooks Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art & Design, Dundee – Choker in silicone, anodised aluminium and silver 

 

New Tastes introduces twelve new jewellery graduates: Wanshu Li, Edinburgh College of Art; Hayley Brooks, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee; Chen Cheng, Birmingham School of Jewellery; Rob Anderson, Sheffield Hallam University; Sheng Zhang, Birmingham School of Jewellery; Darcey Skelly, National College of Art and Design, Dublin; Francesca Lobb, Manchester School of Art; Felicity Lynden, University of Edinburgh; Freya Alder, Glasgow School of Art; Stephanie O Leary, Middlesex University, London; Michaela Murrain, De Montfort University, Leicester; Amanda Denison, Winchester School of Art.

 

KATH LIBBERT JEWELLERY GALLERY
Salts Mill, Saltaire,
Bradford BD18 3LA. – UK
Tel/Fax 01274 599790.
info@kathlibbertjewellery.c…
www.kathlibbertjewellery.co.uk

OPEN DAILY 10 – 5.30 MON – FRI and 10 – 6 AT WEEKENDS

 

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12/11/2016

EXPO ‘PAST PRESENT’ – Alternatives gallery, Roma (IT) – 12 Nov.-6 Dec. 2016

PAST PRESENT
The Grammar of Jewellery

 Maria Rosa Franzin
Gigi Mariani

Alternatives gallery - Opening 12th November – at 6pm

www.alternatives.it
Online exhibition:   www.no-gram.com

PAST PRESENT

Just as language is a set of rules that represent the culture and the way of life of a people, in the same way jewellery is a set of conventions which are also an expression of a vision that is characteristic of a nation. For both, it is a constant interplay and alternation of rules, conventions and customs that come from the past to describe the present. Jewellery is a language and as such is alive insofar as it represents the people who use it. This exhibition aims to focus on the many forms of expression through jewellery. The two goldsmith artists presented, with different personal and professional backgrounds, are however both interpreters of that way of thinking and feeling that is typical of the Italian culture. Italy has always been a melting pot where past and future are fused together, where tradition and innovation are in dialogue, often generating conflicts that can open up new avenues. The rediscovery of ancient techniques and skillful use of existing construction methods characterize the work of Maria Rosa Franzin and Gigi Mariani. Their works show the peculiarities of the Italian language, different for rules and concepts from that of other countries. In other words, we could say « I speak jewellery ».

Past/Present

« Maria Rosa Franzin, who is part of the School of Padua, remains faithful to the use of traditional materials typical of the jewellery world, such as gold and silver, even if with the introduction of colour in recent years. In her latest works, a three-dimensionality already present in the past is accentuated, made of hidden, personal interior spaces. They are introspective works that reveal strength and fragility, light and shadow, presenting a double, inner and outer space, in dialogue with the surrounding world. These are intimate and individual spaces that the artist chooses to share. The introduction of rapid and intense signs, along with the choice of colour, suggest a state of mind. These traces take on the ideal value of an experience, a memory, an emotion. »

Past/PresentMaria Rosa Franzin

 

« Gigi Marianis works express a strong primordial nature, determined by the skillful use of niello, a technique once used extensively in Europe in the Middle Ages as an inlay on engraved or etched metal. Mariani has personalized this skill by completely covering the surface of the metal with this mixture, as if to conceal the underlying preciousness. His work evokes the earth’s crust attacked by the elements. The forms are linear, compact, in spite of being irregular, and express a great force, while maintaining a significant sense of proportion and balance. »

Past/Present - Gigi MarianiGigi Mariani

Maria Rosa Franzin Brooch - Unique Piece Title: La casa dell’Anima 1 Materials: Silver, acrylic painting, acrylicMaria Rosa Franzin – Brooch – Unique Piece « La casa dell’Anima 1″ Materials: Silver, acrylic painting,acrylic

Maria Rosa Franzin  - Brooch - Unique Piece  Materials: Silver, acrylic painting, acrylic - 2016 -   1 535,00 €: Maria Rosa Franzin  - Brooch - Unique Piece "La casa dell anima 3"   Materials: Silver, acrylic painting, acrylic - 2016

Maria Rosa Franzin  – Brooch   « La casa dell anima 3″  – Silver, acrylic painting, acrylic – 2016

Maria Rosa Franzin Brooch - Unique Piece Title: La casa dell’Anima 11 Materials: Silver, acrylic painting, acrylicMaria Maria Rosa Franzin -  Brooch – Unique Piece – « La casa dell’Anima 11″ Materials: Silver, acrylic painting, acrylic

Maria-Rosa Franzin Bracelet - Unique Piece - Pure gold, gold, oxidized silver, steelMaria-Rosa Franzin Bracelet – Unique Piece – Pure gold, gold, oxidized silver, steel

Gigi Mariani Brooch Title: Tracks #2 Materials: Silver, 18kt yellow gold, niello, patinaGigi Mariani - brooch from Rock series, 2016  Title: Tracks #2 – Materials: Silver, 18kt yellow gold, niello, patina

Gigi Mariani Ring Title: Sketches series Materials: Silver, 18kt yellow gold, niello, patinaGigi Mariani  Ring  « Sketches series »  Materials: Silver, 18kt yellow gold, niello, patina

Gigi Mariani Brooch Title: Thoughts Materials: Silver, 18kt yellow gold, enamel, patinaGigi Mariani Brooch  « Thoughts »  Materials: Silver, 18kt yellow gold, enamel, patina

Gigi Mariani  Bracelet: Etnic#1, 2016  Silver, 18kt yellow gold, niello patina.: Gigi Mariani  Bracelet: Etnic#1, 2016  Silver, 18kt yellow gold, niello patina

 

 

Alternatives Gallery
Via della Chiesa Nuova 10
00186 -  Rome
ITALY
info@alternatives.it
+39-06-68308233
Management: Rita Marcangelo

http://www.alternatives.it/

NO-GRAM = online shop of the gallery

 

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15/09/2016

EXPO ‘Saturation Point’ – Gallery Loupe, Montclair (NJ), (USA) – 17 Sept.- 8 Oct. 2016

Classé dans : Exposition/Exhibition,Gal. Loupe (US),Israel (IL),Naama BERGMAN (IL),organics,USA — bijoucontemporain @ 0:19

SATURATION POINT / Naama Bergman

Artist Reception/ opening reception :  Saturday Sept. 17, 6-8 pm
saturation point - Gal. Loupe - Naama Bergman
 
 Gallery Loupe is proud to present Saturation Point, the first solo exhibition by Israeli artist Naama Bergman ; the show will feature her most recent works. Through inventive, impeccably fabricated jewelry and vessels, Bergman exploits the idea of change: emergence, growth, decay, and the tension that accrues between cultural heritage, physical matter, and fleeting time. By combining contradictory materials such as steel and rust within classic formats like urns and pods, she questions the essence of creation, potential, and transformation; she provokes a confrontation between preservation and decomposition, while at the same time positing questions about the hegemony, function, and mutability of mediums and forms. Bergman makes protean objects that tell a continuing tale about the very nature of existence.
Tradition and nostalgia play major roles in Bergman’s aesthetic. As a Sabra of east European heritage, she regards her work as tropes for the dichotomy between familial roots and present day reality. In her latest works, Bergman allows salt to grow slowly upon vessels, pendants, and brooches made from iron mesh. The openwork armatures are hard but delicately crafted, while the salt – a natural preservative – both helps to maintain the rigid support but also breaks it down. Although constantly altering, these pristine objects and jewels are simultaneously frozen in time. Other works will be presented that possess similar existential and cultural references, although they are made from very different substances, such as jewelry wet-molded into shape from animal intestines that have been treated in a salt solution – meant to be viewed as reminders of their former natural life.
Naama Bergman -  Salt Necklace 02. 2015. Salt, Iron Wire, Thread  SATURATION POINT / Naama Bergman -  Salt Necklace 02. 2015. Salt, Iron Wire, Thread
Naama Gergman - Salt Necklace 02. 2015. Salt, Iron Wire, Thread - detailsNaama Bergman -  Salt Necklace 02. 2015. Salt, Iron Wire, Thread – details
Naama Bergman - Salt Brooch 09. 2016. Salt, Iron Wire  SATURATION POINT Naama Bergman - Salt Brooch 09. 2016. Salt, Iron Wire 
SATURATION POINT / Naama BergmanNaama Bergman -   Salt Brooch 06. 2016. Salt, Iron Wire
Naama Bergman -   Salt Brooch 04. 2016. Salt, Plastic Mesh - SATURATION POINT / Naama Bergman -   Salt Brooch 04. 2016. Salt, Plastic Mesh
SATURATION POINT / Naama Bergman - Salt Necklace 06. 2016. Iron, Salt, Thread
Naama BergmanSalt Necklace 06. 2016. Iron, Salt, Thread 
Naama Bergman - Salt Necklace 03. 2015. Salt, Iron Wire, Hemp thread - detailNaama Bergman - Salt Necklace 03. 2015. Salt, Iron Wire, Hemp thread – detail
Naama Bergman was born and raised in Tel Aviv. She holds a BFA from the Department of Jewelry and Fashion, Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, Jerusalem.   Currently living in Munich, she is pursuing graduate studies in jewelry at the prestigious Academie der Bildenden Künste, with Karen Pontoppidan, having also studied there with Otto Künzli. Bergman is the recipient of several awards, including a 2015 and 2016 Study Scholarship for Foreign Graduates in the Fields of Fine Art, Film, and Design/Visual Communication and Film from DAAD, a German foundation, which supports emerging artists; a 2008 and 2009 scholarship for metal design from the Israel Cultural Foundation in America; the Eithan Ron Prize, an award for excellence in jewelry design, and Irit Strauss Prize, a scholarship for excellence in history and theory, from Bezalel Academy of Art and Design, Jerusalem. She has been included in exhibitions around Israel and in New York, the Netherlands, Germany, Tokyo, London, and Paris.

 

 Gallery Loupe
50 Church Street
NJ 07042 – Montclair/ New Jersey
United States
Telephone: 973.744.0061
Fax: 973.744.0062
website: www.galleryloupe.com
mail: contact@galleryloupe.com

 

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25/01/2016

Selection 4 SCHMUCK 2016 : Kadri Mälk

Kadri Mälk,  BLACK BEAUTY

Congrats to all the artists who made the SCHMUCK 2016 list, on show at the Handwerksmesse during #munichjewelleryweek  24/02–1/03/2016

Congrats to all the artists who made the SCHMUCK 2016 list, on show at the Handwerksmesse during #munichjewelleryweek / #jewellery #brooch by Kadri Mälk     brooch by Kadri Mälk

Kadri Mälk  Brooch: Very Guilty 2010  Siberian jet, black rhodium plated white gold, spinel, tourmalines  11.5 x 6.6 x 1.2 cm: Kadri Mälk  Brooches : « Very Guilty » & « Guilty » 2010  Siberian jet, black rhodium plated white gold, spinel, tourmalines  11.5 x 6.6 x 1.2 cm

interview :« Kadri Mälk – Love Me Or Leave Me Or Let Me Be Lonely »
By Aaron Patrick Decker (THANKS to AJF)

I ascended old stairs to a cozy apartment in Tallinn, Estonia, where I had the pleasure of interviewing the renowned Estonian jeweler Kadri Mälk. As the head of the metals department in the Estonian Academy of Arts, she shines a spotlight on younger Estonian jewelers. She has given rise to a generation whose work is strong, individual, and definitely Estonian. Mälk’s work is dark, poetic, and wholly of her own voice. Utilizing such traditional jewelry materials as gold, silver, gemstones, and jet, she creates a recipe whose melancholy fragrances permeate through all her work. 
Aaron Patrick Decker: How did you come to jewelry?
Kadri Mälk: Initially I studied painting for four years and really enjoyed it. Before that, I worked in a publishing house. After studying painting, I suddenly felt that maybe it wasn’t for me, maybe I needed something more intimate. After that I went to the Academy to study jewelry. I was either 28 or 29 when I graduated. I felt somehow that I was late, an autumn flower. I remained a freelance artist and was on my own for about nine years; meanwhile I was invited to teach. Initially it was just a small workload, like once a week. I enjoyed staying in my atelier and working on my own schedule and freedom. I liked it so much, no due dates and a kind of wild life, a lifestyle I still really appreciate.
After graduation I began some studies in stonework. First in St. Petersburg in a stone-cutting factory, a huge factory that received quite high-quality raw materials from Siberia. Then I studied gemology in Finland at the Lahti Design Institute for two years. I was offered to prolong my studies in London in 1993–94 and receive the highest degree one could get in gemological studies. During that time in Estonia, there was no one in the field of gemology. It’s a small field in general, but in Estonia, no one had this sort of certification.
But then my professor, Kuldkepp, fell ill and couldn’t return to the department anymore. Until this point I had worked alone. Leading a department is not just about being an ideological leader, there are other concerns about finances, and finding a team that works. You have to find people who fit together. I had no experience in this work so I was very afraid of the proposal to take the department. And especially since I was offered the gemological certification, which was seductive.
Simultaneously, I got a chance to work in Germany. I was young, bold, and at that time ready to jump. I applied to Bernd Munsteiner’s studio. He rejected me at first, saying he had too much work to also teach an apprentice. Somehow he changed his mind and decided to bring me in. They were intrigued by Estonia, the wild northern forest, so they said okay. He was concerned about my age and the time allotted; to learn stone cutting and faceting requires a large amount of time. I went in there not being able to speak German, and they had a certain dialect. I had some stone-cutting experience from St. Petersburg, but not at the level at which his workshop operated. It was very generous of him to take me.
We began at 7 a.m. and the first break was at 10:30 for some coffee. It was very tight and regimented. Funnily, during lunch they turned off the power in the shop; I thought I could work more during this time, but it was not allowed. He didn’t believe in the beginning that I could learn facet cutting, but at the end he was happy with where I got. I remember having a notebook and just trying to write down everything during lunchtime. I wouldn’t eat. I’d just write what the workers were saying. The old knowledge. It was my passion, stones.
You have said you were close with your professor; can you talk about your decision to take over the department?
Kadri Mälk: She was the reason I decided to take over the department. It was kind of fatal serendipity—as I saw it then, but not anymore. I had to do it because she could not. She was an extraordinary personality in the time and circumstances, she did not fit the environment, didn’t fit the times. If you read her writings, you could tell she had such a drive sourced from somewhere else. She had such a mission to pass on things to people, not in a direct way but in an indirect and metaphoric way. Her teaching methods were not pedagogical at all, she was often much more abstract. She locked the students in the room and said, “Just work.” All should be concentration, creativity driven to the work. No cinema, no theater, no magazines, no outside information, and it should all come from yourself, come through you. Extreme methods, but very effective. She wanted you to achieve the maximum. She was not very communicative, didn’t go anywhere, didn’t move around, her efforts were very concentrated on certain students. I can’t find the right words to completely describe her, but she wanted students to open up by closing off.
Do you think becoming a professor so early shaped you as an artist and continues to shape you?
Kadri Mälk: I was a baby professor. I was elected when I was 37. I had already been a renowned artist for some time, but as an educator, administrator, or team member, I had no experience. Looking back, I realize now the trust from admin and colleagues when I took over the department. My creative past supported me and proved to them I could survive in the school. Just recently somebody outside of the academy, and artists, came to me and said, “Now, Kadri, I realize you have done it well…” In the beginning, others were hesitant because I was seemingly unsuitable for the job. The highest hesitations came from me. I was unsure if I could rise to the occasion. And when the women came, 15 years later, it was some confirmation.
I just liked to make my pieces. And it’s so funny, I still go about my work in a similar way. Nowadays students are much more oriented by a schedule and thinking about making work for exhibition. Deadlines. My satisfaction came from my pieces, from the process. I liked how they came to me, how they happened. When I was in school, learning about the art field was not included. The professor tried to keep this off us, all these associations, how this works, etc. I remember asking her what happens when I graduate. She didn’t tell me anything about the real life of artists. It was all about the work. It was a conscious decision to keep the art world away from us.

Kadri Mälk  necklace "Amnesia" 2010  - ebony, tourmaline, silver, - photo Tanel VeenreKadri Mälk  necklace « Amnesia » 2010  – ebony, tourmaline, silver, – photo Tanel Veenre

Kadri Mälk - "Mid-day of life" 2008 brooch - jet, silver, almandine, smoky quartz - photo Tanel Veenre: Kadri Mälk – « Mid-day of life » 2008 brooch – jet, silver, almandine, smoky quartz – photo Tanel Veenre

Do you think your work changed during this period?
Kadri Mälk: No, not because of the Academy. The majority of my time went into the Academy, but this didn’t affect my work. In the first years, we gave assignments to students in the form of certain themes. Later on, especially at the MA level, where the study is more conceptual, they must meet their choices themselves to reinforce their spiritual identities.
Someone asked me, “What do you like best about teaching?” I feel lucky that I have the possibility to notice and follow how personalities develop and begin to blossom; how new talented personalities emerge in a creative surrounding; and how they act and react. And how passionate they may be in their work! It’s the achievement of every member of our staff.
Not much changed about me, either. Of course I had to modify my talking towards topics, concentrate, and learn to convey or see the methods that worked best, but at the core I didn’t change.
It’s very different to be just a teacher rather than the department leader. You are responsible for all that happens. The biggest difference is that the academy and the students are number one, followed by your work and your family. The academy and the students are number one. They can call me at any time if they need. I feel better in this. They know that they can come, they are not lost.
I think that’s quite admirable. I haven’t heard of another professor so invested in the program in the ways you are. What do you think some of the most important things to pass on to your students are, what do you hope they take away from you and the Academy?
Kadri Mälk: A kind of attitude, that you should believe in yourself. People shouldn’t take you off your path. Younger artists are vulnerable, in a condition to be shaped or reshaped; it’s important to tell them or convince them that whatever happens you should turn that attention in to yourself, otherwise you get lost. If you take into consideration all the opinions you hear, you get lost; there is so much noise. You don’t know where to look or where to go. You don’t orient yourself any longer in the world. Believe in yourself … it’s hard to when you’re young. Believe and be strong in your core.
Then your core begins to fortify?
Kadri Mälk: Yes, it becomes stronger. It crystalizes, the elements that are more important, the ones that are harder, take shape, and the rest falls apart. It comes with time, you shouldn’t force or exaggerate. You have to be patient.
There are so many conferences, so many books asking the big question—is jewelry art? It’s not my task to answer it.
My comment to it is very simple: love me or leave me or let me be lonely. 
Or to put it differently: take it or leave it or let me be lonely.
What do I mean with that? It’s very simple. There is always another way out. It’s not only taking or leaving. There is another possibility which is hardly seen. You just have to be patient and look carefully.
Also, the creative process has confusion, has crisis. You should not be afraid of these things, they are natural. Fear that your next work will fail is so very normal. Crisis is normal in art making. Art is always about starting again in hesitation.
What are your impressions of younger jewelers now coming into the field, at large and in Estonia?
Kadri Mälk: (long pause) It is very hard to generalize, even here the local scene is quite diverse. You can se
more design-oriented work, more personal work. I try to encourage these people who are afraid of having somehow veiled, personal, or exceptional ways of expressing. If they compare themselves to what is happening in different places with people their age, they begin unconsciously to bring other aesthetics into their own work. I want to encourage people who are different, who are slightly insecure.
Francis Bacon said, if you are going to decide to be an artist, you have got to decide that you are not going to be afraid to make a fool of yourself.
Making art is so simple—all you have to do is to wait quietly, staring at a blank wall until the drops of blood appear on your forehead. Be aware that criticism always comes along with creative work. If you can’t handle it, you have to quit.
How frequently and easily success transforms into depression! You can avoid it by leaving some loose threads in your work, some unresolved part that carries you forward in your new work. What you need to know in your next piece is silently present in your last. You can find it while looking in patience. It’s like a seed crystal for your next destination.
I am not really analytical like most. I am interested mostly in my unconscious choices, what I like and what triggers me.
If someone were to ask about your work, how would you describe it to them?
Kadri Mälk: Look at the originals. You should look at the original pieces and see for yourself.
Do you think that is an important idea, to see things in person?
Kadri Mälk: Yes. We are so much in the age of reproduction. We see the screen or the page with the picture. We don’t look at the original anymore, we don’t feel the tactility of the pieces or taste the iron. It is very harmful to humankind to go about it in this manner. Go to the originals. Otherwise it is so meta-meta, you don’t feel, you don’t know the scale, the details, or the material from the copies.
What are some of the things that inspire you?
Kadri Mälk: I don’t know what inspiration is exactly. Sometimes things are more intense and sometimes less intense. Sometimes I feel that I can capture things, forms, colors, something in the air, and sometimes I feel like sand is running through my fingers.
Consciously I cannot, but it comes more from my subconscious. There’s some differentiation between mental and physical subconscious. One is staying here (Mälk points to her head) and one is here (she points to her stomach), the first is mental and then the second is more gut, subconscious. The feelings are very different. Or maybe the frequencies are different. I like life in all its expressions, that’s my source
In talking about those two polar ways—analytical and emotional—in your work, do you bring them together, is there one that’s more important to you?
Kadri Mälk: Usually it’s subconscious, these decisions you make. They are made before they are at your conscious level. You made the decisions in a big fog. Just as in crystallization, they come into being. And when they are there, it is your choice to call them either consciously made or born out of the sky.
Looking at your work, there is a quality of instantaneous moment; going deeper, you find more and more. The work is quite striking and emotionally charged. Seems very palpable, like it has a heartbeat. There is also a melancholy quality to many of your pieces. Is that a conscious decision or a more subconscious one?
Kadri Mälk: A tiger cannot avoid his stripes! (She laughs.)
That’s a great analogy. 
Kadri Mälk: I am very shy describing my work. I am afraid I cannot reach the truth through verbalization.
There is this quality of Estonian jewelers, not a reluctance, but an ability to keep the integrity of the work. It’s hard to describe the work prescriptively in its conceptual and formal functions, often it acts like poetry, it speaks with power but is not completely resolute. What is your opinion of this attitude?
Kadri Mälk: When I think of my jewelry, it’s easier to describe it. “It’s blue, violet, black, and purple. There is fog, there are shades of magenta.” You can be precise without being clear. And unclear may also be precise. It’s very much an oxymoron.

Kadri Mälk, Downcast Face, 2013, brooch, black rhodium-plated white gold, black baroque pearl, black diamonds, black diamond dust, 120 x 72 x 12 mm, artist’s collection, photo: Tiit RammulKadri Mälk, Downcast Face, 2013, brooch, black rhodium-plated white gold, black baroque pearl, black diamonds, black diamond dust, 120 x 72 x 12 mm, artist’s collection, photo: Tiit Rammul

Being precise but unclear, can you talk more about this notion?
Kadri Mälk: It’s really a sort of hologram, like a puzzle. As a notion and phenomenon, I think it’s possible. 
It is an interesting facet of Estonian jewelry. Sort of irresolute.
Kadri Mälk: Yeah, it’s in a stage of becoming. Being on the way.
Yeah, it’s not negative, its more open. 
Kadri Mälk: Yes, an ambivalence. 
Is there something that you want people to get from your work?
Kadri Mälk: To share the unsharable. What often happens is that the viewer approaches in a superficial way, which is natural. On the foreground they see materials, especially if there are unusual materials.
I’ve used a lot of moleskin in my work and it’s taken a kind of attraction or peculiarity in my work. I don’t feel a need to explain the choices I’ve made. How it came to me, it was just an incident. Or a happy accident.
When all my stuff was stolen from my atelier, I found a coat of my grandmother’s from the war, made out of moleskin. I took it apart, slices of extremely thin, like silk, soft silk paper like. Then I saw these pieces. The tenderness at first, the sensuality of the material, and that the fur grew in only one direction. It was so thin, the fur. It had such a strong character, though. I started to work with this, used it a lot, the coat is now gone into all the pieces. I also think the animal is present in the work. The mole, he’s blind, he doesn’t have sight but has extreme animal spirit. All this orientation in time and space. I studied how they moved, their lives, did more research. How they were trapped and caught. This animalism was powerful and important for me in these works. But you aren’t going to retell the story. If you put it into a story, it’s banal. 
Can you talk more about the jet in your work?
Kadri Mälk: When I carve it, like timber or wood, it has nerves like a human body. The stones have structure, they direct you. They tell you where to go. You should go there and you shouldn’t make the wrong decision. There is a negotiation with the stone when I cut it. Jet is mute, silencium. Only a big dust is coming. Your lungs are filled with jet powder. Like stones are directing you in advance, there are inclusions, by heat they will crack more. Jet is completely mute. This is what fascinates me. It’s not much used in jewelry anymore. 
I lack the habit and custom and will to interpret my works after they have been completed. The work either tells you something or it doesn’t. Once you have completed it, then keep quiet. The work must know whether it radiates or not. The piece of jewelry in your mind, in your imagination, is always correct and beautiful. Resistance starts when you try to convert it into material. Oh, la la! Materials are like elementary particles—charged, heavily charged sometimes, but indifferent. They don’t tell you much, you have to tell them the truth.
You have staged events and produced a number of books—JUST MUST, Castle in the Air, etc.—about Estonian jewelry and jewelers. You have made the work coming from the Academy available to a much larger audience. Give us your thoughts about publishing these books and what your intentions were at the time you did them.
Kadri Mälk: Firstly, I love books. I love their smell and the shade of the voice when you turn the page and then unexpectedly see a new image … It’s both emotional and intellectual. Since 1989 I have published twenty-something publications, some of them out-of-print already. The first ones were really ugly ducklings, black-and-white … I’ve strived always to tell something different with them, it has been my passion. Indeed, they have been acting as ambassadors of Estonian jewelry in the world, although it was not intended. So many students coming from abroad have said the pull came from the books. Strange! Usually nowadays the urge comes from the Internet. 
To make an impression abroad is not as important as to make an impression in your own soul.
Thank you.

 Kadri Mälk - "Fresh, dried, only young" 2001 brooch - sarcodon imbricatus (mushroom), silver, almandines: Kadri Mälk – « Fresh, dried, only young » 2001 brooch – sarcodon imbricatus (mushroom), silver, almandines

Kadri Mälk, Medusa IV – ehisnõel (oksüdeeritud hõbe, kumm). coop.artun.ee/nope5/: Kadri Mälk, Medusa IV – ehisnõel (oksüdeeritud hõbe, kumm)

21/02/2015

DECOUVERTE at SCHMUCK 2015 : Georgina TREVIÑO – the denseness of concrete

Classé dans : COUP DE COEUR,DECOUVERTE,Georgina TREVINO (Mx.),Mexique (MX),SCHMUCK / MJW (DE) — bijoucontemporain @ 0:16

Georgina TREVIÑO , who has been selected for SCHMUCK 2015, is a contemporary jeweler from Tijuana, Mexico currently living in San Diego, California.
She obtained a Bachelors Degree in Applied Design with an emphasis in Jewelry Making from San Diego State University in 2014. Her work is a personal narrative and reflection of the nostalgic memories of unfinished architecture in Tijuana, Mexico. She incorporates industrial material local to the framework of Tijuana infrastructure into jewelry that discusses the dichotomy between conventional building material straddling the United States and Mexico border.

 

 Georgina Treviño Georgina Treviño (detail)

 » My work captures the nostalgia of my childhood memories while living in Tijuana, Mexico. After being surrounded by cement walls during my childhood, I started to notice the differences between the way houses and buildings were being built when I moved to the United States. In Tijuana, structures, including family homes, are mostly made of cement. Sometimes they remain unfinished for years, even as additions to already completed structures. No two buildings looked the same and there were no designated communities where class was distinct based off the architecture. When I moved to the United States for college, I drove around neighborhoods, downtown, ventured into suburban and urban areas and I immediately noticed how different the architecture was from my hometown, which was only a short thirty-minute drive away. Buildings in the United States used wood as the framework and housing all looked the same. It was very clear to tell the areas of the city that were poor, wealthy and middle class, just based on the architecture. I focused on this dichotomy in this work and explored with the materials I remember as a child, incorporating them with modern materials that I am surrounded by now as an adult.

Georgina Trevino - Cement and brass neck-pieces. Georgina Trevino – Cement and brass neck-pieces

Georgina Trevino -Cement and steel necklace . 2014 . Georgina Trevino -Cement and steel necklace . 2014

  These pieces investigate the inner structures of buildings and the process of casting cement while capturing geometric and organic shapes. These forms represent trapped memories; the geometric represent the hard walls of my childhood and the organic represent the hollowness that I see and feel now when I look back and try to hone in on those memories. The use of metal implies the half-way-done feel of rusting buildings. I cast cement using found objects that, to me, signify a culture that is distinctly young American. For example, to create a sense of tension, I cast inside latex gloves, condoms, and plastic shot glasses, which create a texture that aids the process of making with these materials. They elevate the meaning between my past and present. The cement forms themselves look heavy but are hollow and very lightweight. This is a direct reflection of the impression I had when I touched the hollow wood walls in the United States after living my entire life in the denseness of concrete. »

 Georgina Trevino - Cement and brass neck-pieces  Georgina Trevino – Cement and brass neck-pieces 

Georgina Treviño. Steel, cement and string . 2014 . Selected for Schmuck 2015Georgina Treviño. « Mensula » – Steel, cement and string . 2014

Georgina Treviño.Cement, foam and sterling silver .2014  Georgina Treviño. « entrampado » – Pendant. Casted Cement, Sterling silver and foam .(2014) 

Georgina Trevino - Found rope, cement , brass and steel . 2014 Georgina Trevino - Nostalia 2 – Found rope, cement , brass and steel . 2014

georgina trevino broochGeorgina Trevino brooch

 

04/04/2014

EXPO ‘Jillian Moore: Fruits of my labor’ – Beyond Fashion, Antwerp (BE) – 21 Mars-3 Mai 2014

Classé dans : Belgique (BE),Exposition/Exhibition,Gal. Beyond (BE),Jillian MOORE (US) — bijoucontemporain @ 3:08

Jillian Moore : Fruits of my labor

 Jillian Moore Makes Things/ Fruits of My Labor

 

« For Jillian Moore’s first solo show in Belgium, « The Fruits of My Labor », an assortment of both major works and smaller, ready-to-wear pieces are presented. Regardless of scale, Moore’s work references biological forms of ambiguous origin. As a result, they straddle both the botanical and zoological. The bright colors paired with the thick gloss of her resin technique creates wearable pieces that are always luscious, and often a little vulgar in one way or another. Moore says of her work:
« Our natural tendency to seek out patterns results in a sensitivity to the congruities in biological forms. Deliberate exploitation of these phenomena results in objects that are both ambiguous and evocative. Some are organs removed from the body in which they once belonged, revealing structures with unknown functions. Others are complete specimens tagged with labels. Signs of dissection as well as taxonomy provide evidence of attempts to demystify these new organisms. However, this approach leaves many unanswered questions and highlights the inherent ethical compromise in these methods of understanding.
I choose materials and techniques that are transformative, resulting in objects that do not readily reveal the processes of their making. Copper may be hidden under layers of paint, the only exposed metal oxidized. The electroforming process allows for wax forms to be coated in copper leaving a hollow shell with textural encrustations–evidence of the acretivce nature of the process of building copper on a molecular level. The resin pieces are light in weight, built on a core of carved foam that is strengthened by successive layers of an opaque, water-based composite resin. The clear epoxy resin is then layered with paint to create a depth of surface typically expected of glass work. The slick gloss of the resin further mimics biology. »

Jillian Moore, Piece, 2009Jillian Moore - brooch : Popel, 2009 – Foam, composite and epoxy resin, paint, nickel silver

 Jillian Moore, Brooches,  Jillian Moore – brooches : Par Lobbe, 2009 – Foam, composite and epoxy resin, fabricated copper, paint, weighted and dyed cord

Jillian Moore, Piece, 2011Jillian MoorePiece: Porosus, 2011Foam, composite and epoxy resin, polymer clay, paint, rubber

 

Jillian Moore - Fruits of my labor - Photo de Beyond Fashion.
Jillian Moore - Fruits of my labor  Photo de Beyond Fashion.
Jillian Moore - Fruits of my labor  Photo de Beyond Fashion.

 

Beyond Fashion
Pourbusstraat 7
2000 – Antwerp
Belgium
Telephone: +3232378541
website: www.beyondfashion.be
mail: beyondfashion@antwerpen.be

01/12/2011

EXPO ‘Sparkle Plenty 7 – Organ/ism’ – Quirk Gallery, Richmond (USA) – 3 Nov.-24 Dec. 2011

Sparkle Plenty 7 : Organ/ism

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(Daniel DiCapriobrooch )

The world is full of life and organisms that thrive in a multitude of ways. From the seemingly mundane to the flat-out bizarre, « things » have found a way to survive. People are both part of the living world, and manipulators of it. An ever-changing world and life’s ability to adapt is the theme for this exhibition. The work presented shows a reverence for these creatures, the inner spark that ignites life, and the ability to survive.

 

PARTICIPATING ARTISTS:
Daniel DiCaprio (courtesy of Charon Kransen Arts) –  Emily Watson –  Hilary Pfeifer –  Jillian MooreMärta Mattsson (courtesy of Sienna Gallery) –  Masako Ondera –  Masumi Kataoka (courtesy of Charon Kransen Arts) — Satomi Kawai

http://www.quirkgallery.com/webyep-system/data/2-18-im-Main_Gallery_Image-3957.jpgMärta Mattsson  Beetle Brooch

http://www.quirkgallery.com/webyep-system/data/2-18-im-Image_1-4486.jpgMasako Onodera : Cluster of Sloughs pendant

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc6/267620_10150256874231705_34707941704_7616455_757024_n.jpgMasako Ondera

https://fbcdn-sphotos-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-snc4/151010_478823396704_34707941704_5802288_5187437_n.jpgJillian Moore

EXPO 'Sparkle Plenty 7 - Organ/ism' - Quirk Gallery, Richmond (USA) - 3 Nov.-24 Dec. 2011 dans Daniel DiCAPRIO (US) satomi_biorhythm1Satomi Kawai : Biorhythm I brooch

Curator Daniel DiCaprio talks about this year’s exhibition at Quirk Gallery (on Art Jewelry Forum) :

« Sparkle Plenty is the annual jewelry exhibition put on by Quirk Gallery in Richmond Virginia.  And this year I was given the opportunity to curate it.  As a jeweler I thought of the exhibitions that have inspired me in the past.  I wanted to create a show that displayed my particular interests in jewelry and other new work that I find exciting.  I also wanted to take this chance to exhibit the work of other young jewelers, most of whom are making these exceptional pieces within the first decade of their professional careers.  These are the ones who inspire me and challenge me to keep working in the studio.  These are some of the artists that I feel add interesting new ideas to the larger art jewelry dialog.  I chose the theme of biologically influenced jewelry, the lifeblood of my own work and the narrative that attracts me to certain pieces. The official prospectus of the show went something like this: “The world is full of life and organisms that thrive in a multitude of ways.  From the seemingly mundane to the flat-out bizarre, “things” have found a way to survive.  People are both part of the living world, and manipulators of it.  An ever-changing world and life’s ability to adapt is the theme for this exhibition.  The work presented shows a reverence for these creatures, the inner spark that ignites life, and the ability to survive.”

From this theme came Organ/ism, a collection of eight jewelers exploring the biological world around us.  Jillian Moore was one of the first artists that came to mind.  Jillian’s work has always appeared to me like animals that have evolved through an alternate reality.  Their existence is imagined into being, and inspired by the creatures that you think couldn’t possibly exist.   They are often presented like taxonomical displays or snapshots of them in mid-autopsy.  This format doesn’t try to provide more answers; rather it adds another layer to the mythology of the creature. Hilary Pfeifer’s work offers a similar interpretation of the biological world, presented “somewhere between humor and curiosity”. Her diminutive and charismatic pieces swarm on gallery walls, displaying the multitude of living adaptations.  Her installations of brooches or necklaces can be like looking through a microscope into a thriving Petri dish, one colonized by single cell cartoons.  These masses of form offer a greater understanding of the individuals, and like Jillian’s work, add an additional layer to a complicated story.

Masumi Kataoka’s work comfortably walks a line between beautiful and disturbing.  Her organ forms, made from actual organs (hog gut and leather), are like a miniature trip to the displays of medical curiosities at the Mutter Museum.  They provoke a curiosity in me that always wants to see what is coming up next.  She has said that her inspiration came from Japanese idioms that express where emotions reside.  This is also expressed in English, when an emotion is felt in your gut or in your heart.

Our shared interest in attraction versus repulsion is an underlying theme of this show.  As you can imagine it would be when jewelers work with dismembered body parts.  Märta Mattsson’s jewelry exemplifies this dichotomy.  She presents wearable objects made from what some people fear the most, insects.  Their electroformed and lacquered bodies are encrusted with cubic zirconias, presenting a glamorous version of what is essentially a dissected insect.  This allows you to confront what it is you find attractive or disturbing about the creature. Masako Onodera also thrives on this theme.  Jewelry emerges from the body like additional appendages from the chest or neck.  Materials like leather, felt and skin-toned found objects make this connection all the more realistic.  Masako’s jewelry addresses the human connection to the living world and our part in its story.

Organ/ism is addressed in a more personal matter with Satomi Kawai’s jewelry.  Her interest lies in the biological rhythm of the female body, the way this connects to culture and more specifically, her own childhood. Materials like wool, cotton and silk relate to Satomi’s own family history, while cellular imagery and bodily forms relate to a larger family.  One shaped by evolution.  Emily Watson approaches this theme from yet another direction.  Her work associates the anatomy and geography of the human race.  The work shows how we are both part of the biological world and manipulators of the environment we live in.

I was nervous as a first time curator about the way everything would come together.  Not just if everyone would agree to participate or if we would be able to meet all the deadlines.  I was concerned with viewers making the same connections that I have made, or alternatively, have I simplified an idea so much that I am beating a dead horse?  Although even that might work well with this theme. »

 

 

Quirk Gallery
311 West Broad Street, Richmond, VA 23220 (USA)
tel 804.644.5450
http://www.quirkgallery.com

15/11/2011

EXPO ‘TRACES: Rust, Dust & Belly Button Fluff’ – Kath Libbert Gallery, Saltaire (UK) – 17 Nov. 2011-29 janv. 2012

TRACES: Rust, Dust & Belly Button FluffTen New Graduates finding beauty in hidden places

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Traces brings together the work of ten new graduates who find beauty in things brushed aside, in intimate ephemeral moments, in smallness, in lost objects, in things that are hidden and secret; creating jewellery that is in turn delicate, dramatic and distinctive.

Says Kath Libbert,
I always find curating the New Graduate Exhibition very exciting. For many collectors, this annual show has become their first sight of work by jewellers who often then go on to become renowned offering a wonderful opportunity to be the first to invest in the talents of the future.

Rust
Using subtly coloured enamels on copper Nicola Roberson’s brooches explore the ageing process, the way paint chips and metal rusts and the patterns they leave behind. Mirjana Smith’s quirky ‘teapots’ are made of rusting vintage tins sourced from charity shops, boot sales and auctions which she then reassembles into characterful and playful constructions.

Dust
Victoria Kelsey’s ‘Precious Grime’ collection is inspired by the marks and traces of age left behind on forgotten jewellery and where dust and dirt has settled she gold plates, literally transforming dirt into precious trails of ‘Gold dust’!

Belly Button Fluff
Michelle Oh is fascinated by the minutiae of intimate relationships. She takes impressions of her loved ones laughter lines, ‘designer stubble’ and even belly buttons casting them into precious permanent silver jewels which embody the memories attached to those moments. She also offers a bespoke service.

From discarded human hair Kerry Howley weaves the most intricate necklaces which play on the attraction and aversion qualities we attribute to hair, creating beautiful pieces from a material usually swept up and thrown away.

The exhibition also includes work by Samantha Hesford, whose joyfully coloured necklaces look like exotic corals. Nicola Mather’s delicate jewellery is inspired by the ephemera of seedheads, pods and dandelion clocks, while Esme Newdick’s latex collars are decorated with patterns reminiscent of those used for scarification in African tribes. Bryony Stanford’s ‘Crushed’ collection takes inspiration from tin cans, discarded, squashed forms that in her hands are transformed into elegant bangles and brooches. Finally Rachel Jones takes a uniquely personal approach to jewellery collecting emotional stories of lost items of jewellery to inspire fresh pieces which contain ‘Traces’ of the original.

 

Also presenting GLITZ – A Glamorous Christmas Showcase starring Elsa Sarantidou, Greece, Josef Koppmann, Germany/UK,  Kate Wood, UK, and Melanie Ankers , UK. Precious pieces with a twist, from Elsa’s flowing wave inspired rings and bracelets encrusted with sparkling diamonds, sapphires and rubies, to Josef’s bold architectural rings and cufflinks set with the most gorgeous carefully selected gems. Kate’s delicate organic collection of jewellery is inspired by blossoms, berries and barnacles, glistening rich clusters of rubies, sapphires and pearls that cascade elegantly, the perfect adornment for that LBD! And for a touch of total glamour, the new Shimmer collection by Melanie, a myriad of delicate silver strands each tipped in rich 24ct gold is stunning!

 

We hope you can join us from 6pm on Thursday 17th November for the opening, refreshments will be served, and we are offering 15% Discount on any work bought on the opening night!

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Nicola Roberson  ‘Valley Road 4’- Brooch enamel on copper

Nicola Roberson is intrigued by the ‘ageing’ process: the way that paint chips, that metal rusts and the patterns it leaves behind. Experimenting with enamels on copper, she creates brooches inspired by photographs that study the natural appearance of rust. She uses the colours and abstract shapes found within these images to inform the surface patterns and form of her work

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Victoria Kelsey ‘Precious Grime’ Onyx necklace in Onyx and 18ct gold plate, detail

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Michelle Oh ‘Hand’- Brooch in silver and turquoise thread

Michelle Oh is an Indonesian designer/maker based in East London. Her work is often inspired by the quotidian and the commonplace, with a special emphasis on the relationships around her.
In this particular series (We Were Here), textures encountered within a domestic life were moulded and cast into precious permanent copies of the memories attached to them. This is her invitation for you to celebrate the everyday.

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Kerry Howley ‘Attraction/Aversion 3’- Necklace in human hair and epoxy resin

Attraction/Aversion is a material exploration of how people can feel seemingly opposing emotional responses simultaneously. The necklaces are made of human hair, a familiar material that we take pride in. However once off of the body hair becomes an innate source of aversion. Kerry wanted to see if she could make discarded hair attractive again. Through the familiar form of a necklace, and using patterns and symmetry that are instinctively pleasing, Kerry Howley has created a delicate balance between the viewer/wearer’s feelings of aversion and attraction.

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Bryony Stanford ‘Crushed and Dissected’- Brooch in gold and silver plated copper

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Bryony Stanford Gold Black Square Brooch

Bryony Stanford creates unique designs through destructive processes.
In her current body of work she focuses on the relationship between construction and deconstruction.
Simple three-dimensional shapes are transformed into intriguing, intricate wearable objects by forcefully changing their original form.
Bryony works mainly intuitively and enjoys the element of surprise innate to her process.
In contrast to this initial freedom, she pays close attention to the visual connection between the interior and exterior of the work by applying different textures and finishes.

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Samantha Hesford Pink Brooch in foam clay with powder coated casting nuggets

Samantha Hesford : « My current body of work has developed by exploring organic shapes, curves of the natural body and repeated elements within design. I have a fascination for non-precious materials particularly those materials that have a tactile quality. I like the idea of jewellery braking out the traditional role using new unusual materials. Playing around with scale challenges me and allows me to create larger scale statement pieces in which to attract the viewers attention.
I explore forms and ideas through making, the softness and curves are appealing aspects of my forms as are the texture, vibrant colour and over all composition. Each of my pieces are made entirely by hand resulting in each piece being completely unique.
I strive to create vibrant, wearable, pieces that attract the viewer’s attention.
 »

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Rachel Jones  ‘Spare Scroll Collection’- Earring in gold plated copper with silver earring scrolls

Recently graduated from Middlesex University, Rachel Jones takes a personal approach to jewellery. Interacting with friends, family and often strangers allows Rachel to create sensitive and personal work. Her graduate collection focuses on stories of lost jewellery. Using collected tales of losing jewellery Rachel creates new pieces often involving familiar existing items of jewellery, creating a juxtaposed of the lost, unwanted, functional and the new. 

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Nicola Mather ‘Dandelion’- Pin Brooch in stainless steel

Nicola Mather is a designer jeweller maker who specialises in stainless steel structures combined with gemstones and pearls to create delicate, sculptural jewellery which is functional but unique.
The designs are often generated from interests in repetition of a single form and extensive experimentation of material. By combining linear forms with vibrant gemstones Nicola intends to mirror the delicate qualities of organic structures whilst adding her own unique style. The jewellery is beautifully intricate but deceptively resilient combining form and movement.
Nicola’s stainless steel designs can be personalised using precious metals (excluding silver) with various gemstones which are available on a commission basis.
Nicola also produces one-off sterling silver designs which are etched with her own personal prints she develops using collected seeds, mushrooms and pods as a printing tool. For more information please contact the gallery.

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Esme Newdick Latex Collar in latex, brass and zinc

Esme Newdick : « I am deeply interested in the Scarification of African Tribes. The intricate nature of the patterns inspired my work and the processes I have explored. I have created a range of collars made out of latex rubber. I utilised the latex as a medium to emulate the skin and to show it does not have to be seen as a ‘fetishist’ material. Through further development of the material, I added powdered metal to create a representation of the patterns of Scarification but also to maintain flexibility in my pieces. The unique combination of these materials allows the metal to react with the latex and this I have been able to manipulate to create different coloration.«  

 

 

Kath Libbert Jewellery Gallery
Salts Mill
Saltaire
BD18 3LA
UK
0044 (0)1274 599790
www.kathlibbertjewellery.co.uk
Open Daily 10 – 5.30 Mon – Fri and 10 – 6 Weekends

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