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27/04/2017

EXCHANGE-BIJOU 1 – Lidia PUICA – fresh green for spring

Lidia Puica

fresh green for spring !

Lidia Puica - april 2017 - czech beads Just arrived from Prague ! Lidia Puica - april 2017 – czech beads Just arrived from Prague !

Lidia Puica - work in progress  #emerald #crochet #necklaceLidia Puica – work in progress  #emerald #crochet #necklace

Lidia Puica -  GO green !Lidia Puica -  GO green !

Lidia Puica  crochet necklace  #lightgreenLidia Puica  crochet necklace  #lightgreen – Light-green crochet necklace with needle felted elements and embroidered beads.
Made of: cotton thread, natural wool, glass beads. – you LIKE IT ? you can buy it HERE

Lidia Puica  crochet necklace  #lightgreen - detailLidia Puica  crochet necklace  #lightgreen detail

GREEN ??? SPRING ?? … yessss … but NOT ONLY !

Lidia Puica - mars 2017Lidia PuicaBlue & purple long crochet necklace with embroidered glass beads -
you LIKE IT ? you can buy it HEREEnregistrer

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05/12/2016

EXCHANGE-BIJOU 1 – Marion Lebouteiller – Got the blues …..

I «got the blues» with Marion Lebouteiller, again and again … sigh ….

Elle expose actuellement à DAZZLE Exhibitions où l’on peut voir quelques-unes de ses dernières pièces en feutre … BLEU of course !

Dazzle@Oxo : We have now opened to the public at Gallery@Oxo. Come down to Oxo Tower Wharf (LONDON) to see us and visit other interesting independent retailers.

Dates 13 November 2016 to 8 January 2017.

Sepiola neckpiece - Sterling silver, handmade felt.Marion Lebouteiller – Sepiola neckpiece – Sterling silver, handmade felt.

 Sepiola neckpiece - Sterling silver, handmade felt - 2016Marion Lebouteiller  Sepiola neckpiece – Sterling silver, handmade felt – 2016 -
in LOVE with this neckpiece !!!!

 Marion Lebouteiller –  22Towards the light – brooch – Sterling silver, copper crystals, handmade felt, gold leaf, steel wire.: Marion Lebouteiller –  22Towards the light – brooch – Sterling silver, copper crystals, handmade felt, gold leaf, steel wire

« Marion explores the relationship between natural and human worlds by combining silver, gold or bronze with natural elements such as mother-of-pearl or felt. …..
I am inspired by my surroundings but also by the Japanese culture and the «Wabi-Sabi» philosophy: the beauty of things imperfect, impermanent and incomplete. I like leaving space to the unexpected and let the materials express themselves.
My techniques include the lost-wax casting and the casting from natural items into silver, gold or bronze but also soldering, hand piercing, traditional chasing techniques
I combine precious and non-precious metals with mother-of-pearl and textiles as I am very interested in the propensity of felt to highlight the coldness and the stiffness of metal.
 All my pieces are handmade, either one-offs or small series, using recycled or Fairmined metals wherever possible, as I am very much into the idea (and the actions) of living on this planet with a minimum impact on the environment and on the life of mining labourers. »

Marion Lebouteiller  -  ~ here is a detail of my Sepiola neckpiece  2016Marion Lebouteiller  -  ~ here is a detail of my Sepiola neckpiece  2016

Marion Lebouteiller ... And the back of the brooch !  recycled silver, felt Marion Lebouteiller … And the back of the brooch !  recycled silver, felt

Marion Lebouteiller - Multi-drops earrings Sterling silver.  ​Patinated, 24k gold leaf, lacquered. Marion Lebouteiller - Multi-drops earrings Sterling silver.  ​Patinated, 24k gold leaf, lacquered

Marion Lebouteiller - "Sepiola necklace I" - Sterling silver, felt.: Marion Lebouteiller - « Sepiola necklace I » – Sterling silver, felt

Marion Lebouteiller -  2016 - Sepiola brooch with blue felt - Sterling silver, handmade felt, steel wire: Marion Lebouteiller -  2016 – Sepiola brooch with blue felt – Sterling silver, handmade felt, steel wire

Marion Lebouteiller  Seeds studs - sterling silver, blue felt: Marion Lebouteiller  Seeds studs – sterling silver, blue felt

 

 

Dazzle@Oxo

riverside Gallery at Oxo Tower Wharf
Oxo Tower Wharf
Bargehouse Street
South Bank
London SE1 9PH
Opening times Monday  to.Saturday10-7,Sundays 11-6,We are closed 25,26,27 December and 1 January. Closing early at 4pm on Christmas Eve and New Year’s Eve.
After Christmas 11-6 daily, There will be two Private View openings on Friday 11 and Saturday 12 November.

helpdesk@coinstreet.org
24-hour information line  020 7021 1686

Telephone during the exhibition 07472 105423.

 

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31/10/2016

EXCHANGE-BIJOU 1 – Linda EZERMAN – How I fell in love with shrimps ….

Classé dans : COUP DE COEUR,EXCHANGE-BIJOU,Hollande (NL),Linda EZERMAN (NL),www Klimt02 — bijoucontemporain @ 23:19

Linda EZERMAN

Contemporary jeweller Linda Ezerman lives and works in Wormerveer, The Netherlands.  Ezerman has a diverse educational background embrassing areas such as Sculpting, Cultural Management and Communication. Her jewellery plays with the paradoxical feelings her surroudings (the woods and the sea) can invoke, as well as the menaning of their history. 

« « In my jewellery I combine non-precious and precious materials. The creation process of my work is lengthy; it takes me many days, if not weeks, to complete a piece of jewellery. I work in an organic manner and combine unusual and unique materials. The result is tactile and wearable light-weight jewellery. Recognise the original materials in my jewellery may require a second or even a third close look.
My jewellery echoes the sea, contemporary and striking. Each piece is handmade and unique. »
 »

 I admired her beach serie, sea seeds, corals & algea jewels ….. This year we got SHRIMPS ! ALL very wearable, VERY desirable shrimps !

Linda Ezerman - Shrimps 2016 - Neckpiece, unique piece Materials: silver, silicone, ink Linda Ezerman - Shrimps 2016 – Neckpiece, unique piece Materials: silver, silicone, ink

Linda Ezerman - Neckpiece from the series Shrimps Materials: silver, paint, silicone, pigment: Linda Ezerman - Neckpiece from the series Shrimps Materials: silver, paint, silicone, pigment

Linda Ezerman  Necklace: Shrimp, 2015  Silver, silicone, ink  Photo by: Linda Ezerman  From series: Shrimps: Linda Ezerman  Necklace: Shrimp, 2015  Silver, silicone, ink  Photo by: Linda Ezerman  From series: Shrimps

Linda Ezerman Neckpiece: Shrimp, 2015 Silver, silicone, ink Photo by: Linda Ezerman From serie: ShrimpsLinda Ezerman - Neckpiece: Shrimp, 2015 – Silver, silicone, ink – Photo by: Linda Ezerman -From serie: Shrimps

« In my jewellery I express how I experience the outside world. I am fascinated by the surroundings I find myself in and what these surroundings invokes in me: paradoxical feelings of freedom, security and imminent danger.
A walk in the woods, for example, invokes a feeling of freedom, yet the woods also make me feel slightly ill at ease: there always seems to be lurking something in the shadows.
With the sea I also maintain a paradoxical relationship. There is space and unfamiliar life, which I find both fascinating and frightening because of its incomprehensible infinity.
Moreover, the history of my surroundings create meaning. Century-old remnants of industrial life have made this landscape into what it is today and shaped the people who live here into who and what they are.
The materials I work with originate from my surroundings: felt, wood, silver and copper, mixed with polymer clay, silicone and paint. My work is wearable, which allows it to offer security or protection from that which is so intangible and yet so impressive: the surroundings in which you find yourself. »  Linda Ezerman

 Linda Ezerman Brooch: Shrimp, 2015 Silver, silicone, ink: Linda Ezerman Brooch: Shrimp, 2015 Silver, silicone, ink

 

Had several workshops/workclasses in felt jewelry, polymer clay ‘at Dutch Polymer Guild), goldsmithing
Exhibited in 2016 at « Más que Zuecos y Tulipanes./Més que esclops i tulipes« 

 

She will e at SIERAAD 2016 – Amsterdam – 10-13 Nov. 2016

SIERAAD Art Fair 2016 - Amsterdam - 10-13 Nov. 2016

  LINDA EZERMAN Dutch linda@ezerman.nl www.lezerman.com  stand 52bLINDA EZERMAN  Dutch  linda@ezerman.nl  www.lezerman.com  stand 52b

25/01/2016

Selection 4 SCHMUCK 2016 : Kadri Mälk

Kadri Mälk,  BLACK BEAUTY

Congrats to all the artists who made the SCHMUCK 2016 list, on show at the Handwerksmesse during #munichjewelleryweek  24/02–1/03/2016

Congrats to all the artists who made the SCHMUCK 2016 list, on show at the Handwerksmesse during #munichjewelleryweek / #jewellery #brooch by Kadri Mälk     brooch by Kadri Mälk

Kadri Mälk  Brooch: Very Guilty 2010  Siberian jet, black rhodium plated white gold, spinel, tourmalines  11.5 x 6.6 x 1.2 cm: Kadri Mälk  Brooches : « Very Guilty » & « Guilty » 2010  Siberian jet, black rhodium plated white gold, spinel, tourmalines  11.5 x 6.6 x 1.2 cm

interview :« Kadri Mälk – Love Me Or Leave Me Or Let Me Be Lonely »
By Aaron Patrick Decker (THANKS to AJF)

I ascended old stairs to a cozy apartment in Tallinn, Estonia, where I had the pleasure of interviewing the renowned Estonian jeweler Kadri Mälk. As the head of the metals department in the Estonian Academy of Arts, she shines a spotlight on younger Estonian jewelers. She has given rise to a generation whose work is strong, individual, and definitely Estonian. Mälk’s work is dark, poetic, and wholly of her own voice. Utilizing such traditional jewelry materials as gold, silver, gemstones, and jet, she creates a recipe whose melancholy fragrances permeate through all her work. 
Aaron Patrick Decker: How did you come to jewelry?
Kadri Mälk: Initially I studied painting for four years and really enjoyed it. Before that, I worked in a publishing house. After studying painting, I suddenly felt that maybe it wasn’t for me, maybe I needed something more intimate. After that I went to the Academy to study jewelry. I was either 28 or 29 when I graduated. I felt somehow that I was late, an autumn flower. I remained a freelance artist and was on my own for about nine years; meanwhile I was invited to teach. Initially it was just a small workload, like once a week. I enjoyed staying in my atelier and working on my own schedule and freedom. I liked it so much, no due dates and a kind of wild life, a lifestyle I still really appreciate.
After graduation I began some studies in stonework. First in St. Petersburg in a stone-cutting factory, a huge factory that received quite high-quality raw materials from Siberia. Then I studied gemology in Finland at the Lahti Design Institute for two years. I was offered to prolong my studies in London in 1993–94 and receive the highest degree one could get in gemological studies. During that time in Estonia, there was no one in the field of gemology. It’s a small field in general, but in Estonia, no one had this sort of certification.
But then my professor, Kuldkepp, fell ill and couldn’t return to the department anymore. Until this point I had worked alone. Leading a department is not just about being an ideological leader, there are other concerns about finances, and finding a team that works. You have to find people who fit together. I had no experience in this work so I was very afraid of the proposal to take the department. And especially since I was offered the gemological certification, which was seductive.
Simultaneously, I got a chance to work in Germany. I was young, bold, and at that time ready to jump. I applied to Bernd Munsteiner’s studio. He rejected me at first, saying he had too much work to also teach an apprentice. Somehow he changed his mind and decided to bring me in. They were intrigued by Estonia, the wild northern forest, so they said okay. He was concerned about my age and the time allotted; to learn stone cutting and faceting requires a large amount of time. I went in there not being able to speak German, and they had a certain dialect. I had some stone-cutting experience from St. Petersburg, but not at the level at which his workshop operated. It was very generous of him to take me.
We began at 7 a.m. and the first break was at 10:30 for some coffee. It was very tight and regimented. Funnily, during lunch they turned off the power in the shop; I thought I could work more during this time, but it was not allowed. He didn’t believe in the beginning that I could learn facet cutting, but at the end he was happy with where I got. I remember having a notebook and just trying to write down everything during lunchtime. I wouldn’t eat. I’d just write what the workers were saying. The old knowledge. It was my passion, stones.
You have said you were close with your professor; can you talk about your decision to take over the department?
Kadri Mälk: She was the reason I decided to take over the department. It was kind of fatal serendipity—as I saw it then, but not anymore. I had to do it because she could not. She was an extraordinary personality in the time and circumstances, she did not fit the environment, didn’t fit the times. If you read her writings, you could tell she had such a drive sourced from somewhere else. She had such a mission to pass on things to people, not in a direct way but in an indirect and metaphoric way. Her teaching methods were not pedagogical at all, she was often much more abstract. She locked the students in the room and said, “Just work.” All should be concentration, creativity driven to the work. No cinema, no theater, no magazines, no outside information, and it should all come from yourself, come through you. Extreme methods, but very effective. She wanted you to achieve the maximum. She was not very communicative, didn’t go anywhere, didn’t move around, her efforts were very concentrated on certain students. I can’t find the right words to completely describe her, but she wanted students to open up by closing off.
Do you think becoming a professor so early shaped you as an artist and continues to shape you?
Kadri Mälk: I was a baby professor. I was elected when I was 37. I had already been a renowned artist for some time, but as an educator, administrator, or team member, I had no experience. Looking back, I realize now the trust from admin and colleagues when I took over the department. My creative past supported me and proved to them I could survive in the school. Just recently somebody outside of the academy, and artists, came to me and said, “Now, Kadri, I realize you have done it well…” In the beginning, others were hesitant because I was seemingly unsuitable for the job. The highest hesitations came from me. I was unsure if I could rise to the occasion. And when the women came, 15 years later, it was some confirmation.
I just liked to make my pieces. And it’s so funny, I still go about my work in a similar way. Nowadays students are much more oriented by a schedule and thinking about making work for exhibition. Deadlines. My satisfaction came from my pieces, from the process. I liked how they came to me, how they happened. When I was in school, learning about the art field was not included. The professor tried to keep this off us, all these associations, how this works, etc. I remember asking her what happens when I graduate. She didn’t tell me anything about the real life of artists. It was all about the work. It was a conscious decision to keep the art world away from us.

Kadri Mälk  necklace "Amnesia" 2010  - ebony, tourmaline, silver, - photo Tanel VeenreKadri Mälk  necklace « Amnesia » 2010  – ebony, tourmaline, silver, – photo Tanel Veenre

Kadri Mälk - "Mid-day of life" 2008 brooch - jet, silver, almandine, smoky quartz - photo Tanel Veenre: Kadri Mälk – « Mid-day of life » 2008 brooch – jet, silver, almandine, smoky quartz – photo Tanel Veenre

Do you think your work changed during this period?
Kadri Mälk: No, not because of the Academy. The majority of my time went into the Academy, but this didn’t affect my work. In the first years, we gave assignments to students in the form of certain themes. Later on, especially at the MA level, where the study is more conceptual, they must meet their choices themselves to reinforce their spiritual identities.
Someone asked me, “What do you like best about teaching?” I feel lucky that I have the possibility to notice and follow how personalities develop and begin to blossom; how new talented personalities emerge in a creative surrounding; and how they act and react. And how passionate they may be in their work! It’s the achievement of every member of our staff.
Not much changed about me, either. Of course I had to modify my talking towards topics, concentrate, and learn to convey or see the methods that worked best, but at the core I didn’t change.
It’s very different to be just a teacher rather than the department leader. You are responsible for all that happens. The biggest difference is that the academy and the students are number one, followed by your work and your family. The academy and the students are number one. They can call me at any time if they need. I feel better in this. They know that they can come, they are not lost.
I think that’s quite admirable. I haven’t heard of another professor so invested in the program in the ways you are. What do you think some of the most important things to pass on to your students are, what do you hope they take away from you and the Academy?
Kadri Mälk: A kind of attitude, that you should believe in yourself. People shouldn’t take you off your path. Younger artists are vulnerable, in a condition to be shaped or reshaped; it’s important to tell them or convince them that whatever happens you should turn that attention in to yourself, otherwise you get lost. If you take into consideration all the opinions you hear, you get lost; there is so much noise. You don’t know where to look or where to go. You don’t orient yourself any longer in the world. Believe in yourself … it’s hard to when you’re young. Believe and be strong in your core.
Then your core begins to fortify?
Kadri Mälk: Yes, it becomes stronger. It crystalizes, the elements that are more important, the ones that are harder, take shape, and the rest falls apart. It comes with time, you shouldn’t force or exaggerate. You have to be patient.
There are so many conferences, so many books asking the big question—is jewelry art? It’s not my task to answer it.
My comment to it is very simple: love me or leave me or let me be lonely. 
Or to put it differently: take it or leave it or let me be lonely.
What do I mean with that? It’s very simple. There is always another way out. It’s not only taking or leaving. There is another possibility which is hardly seen. You just have to be patient and look carefully.
Also, the creative process has confusion, has crisis. You should not be afraid of these things, they are natural. Fear that your next work will fail is so very normal. Crisis is normal in art making. Art is always about starting again in hesitation.
What are your impressions of younger jewelers now coming into the field, at large and in Estonia?
Kadri Mälk: (long pause) It is very hard to generalize, even here the local scene is quite diverse. You can se
more design-oriented work, more personal work. I try to encourage these people who are afraid of having somehow veiled, personal, or exceptional ways of expressing. If they compare themselves to what is happening in different places with people their age, they begin unconsciously to bring other aesthetics into their own work. I want to encourage people who are different, who are slightly insecure.
Francis Bacon said, if you are going to decide to be an artist, you have got to decide that you are not going to be afraid to make a fool of yourself.
Making art is so simple—all you have to do is to wait quietly, staring at a blank wall until the drops of blood appear on your forehead. Be aware that criticism always comes along with creative work. If you can’t handle it, you have to quit.
How frequently and easily success transforms into depression! You can avoid it by leaving some loose threads in your work, some unresolved part that carries you forward in your new work. What you need to know in your next piece is silently present in your last. You can find it while looking in patience. It’s like a seed crystal for your next destination.
I am not really analytical like most. I am interested mostly in my unconscious choices, what I like and what triggers me.
If someone were to ask about your work, how would you describe it to them?
Kadri Mälk: Look at the originals. You should look at the original pieces and see for yourself.
Do you think that is an important idea, to see things in person?
Kadri Mälk: Yes. We are so much in the age of reproduction. We see the screen or the page with the picture. We don’t look at the original anymore, we don’t feel the tactility of the pieces or taste the iron. It is very harmful to humankind to go about it in this manner. Go to the originals. Otherwise it is so meta-meta, you don’t feel, you don’t know the scale, the details, or the material from the copies.
What are some of the things that inspire you?
Kadri Mälk: I don’t know what inspiration is exactly. Sometimes things are more intense and sometimes less intense. Sometimes I feel that I can capture things, forms, colors, something in the air, and sometimes I feel like sand is running through my fingers.
Consciously I cannot, but it comes more from my subconscious. There’s some differentiation between mental and physical subconscious. One is staying here (Mälk points to her head) and one is here (she points to her stomach), the first is mental and then the second is more gut, subconscious. The feelings are very different. Or maybe the frequencies are different. I like life in all its expressions, that’s my source
In talking about those two polar ways—analytical and emotional—in your work, do you bring them together, is there one that’s more important to you?
Kadri Mälk: Usually it’s subconscious, these decisions you make. They are made before they are at your conscious level. You made the decisions in a big fog. Just as in crystallization, they come into being. And when they are there, it is your choice to call them either consciously made or born out of the sky.
Looking at your work, there is a quality of instantaneous moment; going deeper, you find more and more. The work is quite striking and emotionally charged. Seems very palpable, like it has a heartbeat. There is also a melancholy quality to many of your pieces. Is that a conscious decision or a more subconscious one?
Kadri Mälk: A tiger cannot avoid his stripes! (She laughs.)
That’s a great analogy. 
Kadri Mälk: I am very shy describing my work. I am afraid I cannot reach the truth through verbalization.
There is this quality of Estonian jewelers, not a reluctance, but an ability to keep the integrity of the work. It’s hard to describe the work prescriptively in its conceptual and formal functions, often it acts like poetry, it speaks with power but is not completely resolute. What is your opinion of this attitude?
Kadri Mälk: When I think of my jewelry, it’s easier to describe it. “It’s blue, violet, black, and purple. There is fog, there are shades of magenta.” You can be precise without being clear. And unclear may also be precise. It’s very much an oxymoron.

Kadri Mälk, Downcast Face, 2013, brooch, black rhodium-plated white gold, black baroque pearl, black diamonds, black diamond dust, 120 x 72 x 12 mm, artist’s collection, photo: Tiit RammulKadri Mälk, Downcast Face, 2013, brooch, black rhodium-plated white gold, black baroque pearl, black diamonds, black diamond dust, 120 x 72 x 12 mm, artist’s collection, photo: Tiit Rammul

Being precise but unclear, can you talk more about this notion?
Kadri Mälk: It’s really a sort of hologram, like a puzzle. As a notion and phenomenon, I think it’s possible. 
It is an interesting facet of Estonian jewelry. Sort of irresolute.
Kadri Mälk: Yeah, it’s in a stage of becoming. Being on the way.
Yeah, it’s not negative, its more open. 
Kadri Mälk: Yes, an ambivalence. 
Is there something that you want people to get from your work?
Kadri Mälk: To share the unsharable. What often happens is that the viewer approaches in a superficial way, which is natural. On the foreground they see materials, especially if there are unusual materials.
I’ve used a lot of moleskin in my work and it’s taken a kind of attraction or peculiarity in my work. I don’t feel a need to explain the choices I’ve made. How it came to me, it was just an incident. Or a happy accident.
When all my stuff was stolen from my atelier, I found a coat of my grandmother’s from the war, made out of moleskin. I took it apart, slices of extremely thin, like silk, soft silk paper like. Then I saw these pieces. The tenderness at first, the sensuality of the material, and that the fur grew in only one direction. It was so thin, the fur. It had such a strong character, though. I started to work with this, used it a lot, the coat is now gone into all the pieces. I also think the animal is present in the work. The mole, he’s blind, he doesn’t have sight but has extreme animal spirit. All this orientation in time and space. I studied how they moved, their lives, did more research. How they were trapped and caught. This animalism was powerful and important for me in these works. But you aren’t going to retell the story. If you put it into a story, it’s banal. 
Can you talk more about the jet in your work?
Kadri Mälk: When I carve it, like timber or wood, it has nerves like a human body. The stones have structure, they direct you. They tell you where to go. You should go there and you shouldn’t make the wrong decision. There is a negotiation with the stone when I cut it. Jet is mute, silencium. Only a big dust is coming. Your lungs are filled with jet powder. Like stones are directing you in advance, there are inclusions, by heat they will crack more. Jet is completely mute. This is what fascinates me. It’s not much used in jewelry anymore. 
I lack the habit and custom and will to interpret my works after they have been completed. The work either tells you something or it doesn’t. Once you have completed it, then keep quiet. The work must know whether it radiates or not. The piece of jewelry in your mind, in your imagination, is always correct and beautiful. Resistance starts when you try to convert it into material. Oh, la la! Materials are like elementary particles—charged, heavily charged sometimes, but indifferent. They don’t tell you much, you have to tell them the truth.
You have staged events and produced a number of books—JUST MUST, Castle in the Air, etc.—about Estonian jewelry and jewelers. You have made the work coming from the Academy available to a much larger audience. Give us your thoughts about publishing these books and what your intentions were at the time you did them.
Kadri Mälk: Firstly, I love books. I love their smell and the shade of the voice when you turn the page and then unexpectedly see a new image … It’s both emotional and intellectual. Since 1989 I have published twenty-something publications, some of them out-of-print already. The first ones were really ugly ducklings, black-and-white … I’ve strived always to tell something different with them, it has been my passion. Indeed, they have been acting as ambassadors of Estonian jewelry in the world, although it was not intended. So many students coming from abroad have said the pull came from the books. Strange! Usually nowadays the urge comes from the Internet. 
To make an impression abroad is not as important as to make an impression in your own soul.
Thank you.

 Kadri Mälk - "Fresh, dried, only young" 2001 brooch - sarcodon imbricatus (mushroom), silver, almandines: Kadri Mälk – « Fresh, dried, only young » 2001 brooch – sarcodon imbricatus (mushroom), silver, almandines

Kadri Mälk, Medusa IV – ehisnõel (oksüdeeritud hõbe, kumm). coop.artun.ee/nope5/: Kadri Mälk, Medusa IV – ehisnõel (oksüdeeritud hõbe, kumm)

23/12/2015

EXPO/CONCOURS ‘Filo Rosso 2015′ … & the WINNER is …. – Sala Negrisin & Museo Carà, Muggia (IT) / DRAT Gallery & Palazzo del Podestà, Izola (Slovenia) – 12 Dec.2015 – 24 Janv.2016

FILO ROSSO 2015

Le realizzazioni selezionate dalla giuria saranno esposte assieme ai bozzetti presso il Museo d’Arte Moderna «Ugo Carà» o presso la Sala Comunaled’Arte «Giuseppe Negrisin» di Muggia, Trieste (Italia) dal 12 dicembre 2015 al 24 gennaio 2015
e nel mese di maggio 2016 presso il «Palazzo del Prefetto» o  la Galleria Drat a IZOLA  (Slovenia) 

11 Dec. : 17.30 Inaugurazione  MUGGIA (Ts – Italia) – Museo  d’Arte Moderna «Ugo Carà»
11 Dec. :  19.30 Inaugurazione/Otvoritev  IZOLA (Slovenia) Galerija «Drat»

Quest’anno viene inoltre presentato ilcoup de coeur”: mostra -mostre- dedicata a Silvia Beccaria (Izola) e a Vered Babai (Muggia), artista israeliana che espone per la prima volta in Italia.

Filo Rosso 2015:

The WINNER of FiloRosso 2015 is Alix Tran and her poetic necklace !!

 Alix_Tran_Premio_Filo_Rosso Alix TranCol Claudine, 22x20cm, necklace, linen and brass, 2015.
« Col Claudine (Peter Pan collar), is the contrast between a chaste and white collar, detached from the garment’s body, and the invasion of small precious flies.Flies concentrated on areas of cracks in the tissue, like wounds. Aggregated on a soft material, and loose like a net, that takes them to the trap. They become companion insects. Like a Memento mori. »

Prix FiloRossoPrix FiloRosso  – transmis du dernier gagnant, il sera transmis au prochain gagnant …. fil rouge de la création bijou !

  jury - Ruiz_prada_LeMignot_Babai_gassier_micerale jury ! deg à dr : Agatha Ruiz de la Prada, Jean Yves Le Mignot, Vered Badai, Marianne Gassier, Giovanni Micera

 

Non primés mais remarqués, les bijoux suivants :

  Biljana Klekackoska (Macedonia) brooch 'the letter' seta, argento, acciaio, colore: Biljana Klekackoska (Macedonia) – « The Letter » BROOCH
Techniques: filigree, drawing/writing and aquarelle on silk with iron-fixing silk colors, sowing, oxidization
Materials: silver (925 and fine), silk, steel – Dimensions: 9.6 cm. x 7cm. x 1cm.
« This piece is part of the exploration series wearable memories. This is a “never sent love letter”. It contains everything unsaid to a lover, but worn inside. Now it appeared in a material form, ready to be seen and worn outside. »

 Noga Harel - Israel Title : Oceanic bloom NECKLACE Techniques: felting, sewing, reconstructing and assembling. Materials: wool, corals, pearls, crystals, thread, fabric, garlic flowers. Dimensions : 41 cm. x 24 cm. - Depth : 11 cm.: Noga Harel – Israel – « Oceanic bloom » NECKLACE Techniques: felting, sewing, reconstructing and assembling. Materials: wool, corals, pearls, crystals, thread, fabric, garlic flowers. Dimensions : 41 cm. x 24 cm. – Depth : 11 cm.
« The work  » Oceanic bloom » deals with the artist’s ability to present simultaneously different characters. In this work I wanted to investigate the wonderful world of the plants.
The result will always be based on reality but full of the inner emotional world of the creator…And at the unique personal perspective… « 

Noga Harel (IL)  - photo M.Gassier - - Oceanic bloom" NECKLACE Techniques: felting, sewing, reconstructing and assembling. Materials: wool, corals, pearls, crystals, thread, fabric, garlic flowers. Dimensions : 41 cm. x 24 cm. - Depth : 11 cm.: Noga Harel (IL) (detail) - photo M.Gassier - - Oceanic bloom" NECKLACE Techniques: felting, sewing, reconstructing and assembling. Materials: wool, corals, pearls, crystals, thread, fabric, garlic flowers. Dimensions : 41 cm. x 24 cm. - Depth : 11 cm.:

Noga Harel - Israel – « Oceanic bloom » NECKLACE (details)

Heidemarie Herb Germany Title: Schluesselkinder - collection time PENDANT Materials: fabric, silver, mix media, pigment Dimensions: 12 cm. x 8 cm. Techniques: textile impregnated in plaster, colorured with pigmentHeidemarie Herb  – Germany – « Schluesselkinder » – collection time PENDANT
Materials: fabric, silver, mix media, pigment – Dimensions: 12 cm. x 8 cm.
Techniques: textile impregnated in plaster, colorured with pigment
« My work is the expression of the pain of their children that they must often live with greater responsibility of them. A reality of the daily life. » Potographer: Silvana Tili

Muggia Museo U Carà - FiloRosso 2015-  Heidemarie Herb: Heidemarie Herb

 Aleksandra Atanasovski, Slovenija -   me(n)talna neznost RING Materials: silver and gold, red silk. Dimensions: 2.5x1 cm and 25x25 cm red silk Techniques: inprint of finger tip, casting in silver.:  Aleksandra Atanasovski, Slovenija -   « me(n)talna neznost » RING – Materials: silver and gold, red silk. Dimensions: 2.5×1 cm and 25×25 cm red silk Techniques: inprint of finger tip, casting in silver.
« I was oserving the space beetwen a thought and action, how the softnes (of silk) can be tuched, perceved by finger, and how this finger can become metalic in a fraction of a second. »

Sigal MeshorerSigal Meshorer – Israel – « Missing Embroidery » RING
Materials: Silver 925, White Linen. Dimensions: W-54mm. H-32-42mm.
« The work consists of 2 identical rings.
One with flat white linen fabric, the other with domed white linen.
The fabric sits on a circle on top of the ring, an outer ring holds it in place by pressure.
The fabric imitates either a white stone or a miniature embroidery hoop. »

Et, j’ajouterai, quelques coups de coeur personnels :

Flavia Michelutti - Muggia Museo U Carà - FiloRosso- : Flavia Michelutti – collana con ciondolo « aperto »

 Flavia Michelutti (chiuso): Flavia Michelutti - collana con ciondolo « chiuso »

  broche de Martina Obid Mlakar (front) - FiloRosso 2015broche « La pelle della mia vita » de Martina Obid Mlakar (front)

 -  broche "La pelle della mia vita" de Martina Obid Mlakar (back) - FiloRosso 2015broche « La pelle della mia vita » (« Pores of my life ») de Martina Obid Mlakar (back)

Yasmin Vinograd - Muggia Museo U Carà - FiloRosso 2015- Yasmin Vinograd  « The Wave » necklace / silver,silkwork  

Galit Einav (detail)Galit Einav necklace (detail)

Jure Kodre ring - FiloRosso 2015: Jure Kodre ring « In memory » – with a « filo rosso » work in the inside of the ring ….

Jure Kodre ring - FiloRosso 2015: Jure Kodre ring « In memory »

Huberto Široka (croix de vie) - Muggia Museo U Carà - FiloRosso 2015-  :  Huberto Široka (back):

Huberto Široka (croix de vie – entre croix et sexe ….) (front & back)

 Daniela Luzzu with the necklace "Radici" - tribute to Frida Kahlo: Daniela Luzzu (IT) with the necklace « Radici » – tribute to Frida Kahlo

 collier di "BONATI2" (NELLY E PATRIZIA Bonati) collier di « BONATI2 » (Nelly & Patrizia Bonati)

Muggia - Sala Negrisin - collier di BONATI2 NELLY E PATRIZIA: Muggia - Sala Negrisin - collier di BONATI2 NELLY E PATRIZIA:

collier di « BONATI2 » (Nelly & Patrizia Bonati) (detagli)

 Sandra Kocjancic,  detail Sandra Kocjancic,  detail

Pour cette édition de FiloRosso il y a plus de 80 artistes inscrits de toutes nationalités confondues: Italie, France, Slovènie, Croatie, Autriche…Etats-Unis, Israel … Quelques noms: Sebastien CarréGigi Mariani, Barbara Uderzo, Lucilla Giovanninetti (Eandare) , etc …… et de très jeunes artistes encore peu connus du public :

avec (liste non certifiée !)  Lucilla Giovanninetti –  Martina Obid Mlakar –  Marco PiccialiChiara LucatoBarbara UderzoAude MedoriTania PalazziRoberta RisoloJasmina WeissSilvia Beccaria –  Patrizia Bonati & Nelly Bonati Daniela RepettoLuisa ChiandottoSébastien CarréRomi BukovecTinka LoncarAleksandra AtanasovskiYasmin VinogradGigi Mariani Maria Chiara CassaràAlix TranFlora SicaLaura VolpiNataša GrandovecHuberto ŠirokaAnnie Sibert Žarko OgnjenovičAna SabolićMarta PejoskaRoberta PavoneSilvia Valenti Petra BoleBibi KlekackoskaLosch EmilieMonika Šangulin –  Sandra KocjancicInbar Shahak Galit Einav —  Sara Progressi. — Rosanna Raljević Ceglar (NIIRO Jewelry) -

La manifestazione è promossa dal Comune di Muggia in Italia e dal Comune di Izola in Slovenia è stata reralizzata con il contributo della Provincia di Trieste.  
Tra gli artisti che partecipano il pluripremiato Sébastien Carré , Francia, vincitore tra l’altro del premio  « Giovane creatore » al salone Révelation di Parigi nell’autunno scoroso, Gigi Mariani, Primo Premio nel 2014 a « Joya » a Barcellona o l’industrial design Petra Bole della Slovenia.  Le opere esposte saranno oggetto di una selezione a cura della giuria internazionale composta da:   
Jean-Yves Le Mignot – curatore mostre bijou 
Vered Babai – artista orafa israeliana  
Marianne Gassier – blogger di «bijoux contemporain»  
Giovanni Micera – Direttore della rivista «Preziosa Magazine»  
Agatha Ruiz de la Prada , stilista spagnola che ha fatto del colore e della forma il suo credo conosciuto in tutto il mondo, è la madrina d’eccezione di questa manifestazione.  

FiloRosso 2015 -Sebastien Carré - broche  front: Sebastien Carré - broche – proposition pour FiloRosso 2015


 Quest’anno viene inoltre presentato ilcoup de coeur”: mostra dedicata a Silvia Beccaria e a Vered Babai, artista israeliana che espone per la prima volta in Italia.

Silvia Beccaria  -  Palazzo del Municipio- Izola- SloveniaSilvia Beccaria  -  Palazzo del Municipio- Izola- Slovenia

Silvia Beccaria  -  Palazzo del Municipio- Izola- SloveniaSilvia Beccaria  -  Palazzo del Municipio- Izola- Slovenia

Vered Babai - broochesMuggia – Museo U Carà – expo « coup de coeur » Vered Babai

Muggia - Museo U Carà - expo "coup de coeur" Vered BabaiMuggia – Museo U Carà – expo « coup de coeur » Vered Babai

***

Scuola di Musica di Izola "Palazzo Besenghi" - point culminant de la soirée avec cette jeune musicienne de 16 ans .... elle joue depuis 10 ans .... sa musique était tellement belle, elle, elle en devenait encore plus belle, illuminée .... MAGIQUE !!! MERCI !!! Scuola di Musica di Izola « Palazzo Besenghi » – point culminant de la soirée avec cette jeune musicienne de 16 ans …. elle joue depuis 10 ans …. sa musique était tellement belle, elle, elle en devenait encore plus belle, illuminée …. MAGIQUE !!! MERCI !!!

 

 

Museo d’Arte Ugo Carà
Via Roma, 9,
34015 Muggia TS, Italie
tel +39 040 927 8632

 

Sala Comunale d’Arte «Giuseppe Negrisin»
Piazza Marconi 1
34015 – Muggia Italy
Telephone: +39 403360340
website: www.benvenutiamuggia.eu
mail: ufficio.cultura@comunedimuggia.ts.it
info.filorossobijoux@gmail.com 
DRAT-GALLERY - Sandra Kocjančič 
Ljubljanska ul.21
6310 Izola Slovenia
tel +386 41 952 918

 

 

 

23/09/2015

EXPO during JOYA Barcelona OFF 2015 : ‘To Recover’ – Klimt02 Gallery, Barcelona (ES) – 7 Oct.-7 Nov. 2015

exhibition being part of « OFF JOYA » 2015

http://www.joyabarcelona.com/images/Prensa/logo_joya.jpg

To RecoverKlimt02 Gallery

Opening : 7 October from 19 h.

To Recover Exhibition  / 07Oct - 7Nov2015 Klimt02 Gallery  (Ted Noten Superbitch Bag, 2000 / Superbitch Bag Revisited, 2015)

Artist list   Simon CottrellKarl FritschGésine HackenbergKarin JohanssonJiro KamataSari LiimattaStefano MarchettiTed NotenNoon Passama –  Annelies PlanteydtTore SvenssonLisa WalkerManon van Kouswijk

Manon van Kouswijk Pearl Grey necklace, 2008 / Pearl Grey Revisited necklace, 2015 Glass elements (saucer, hand formed cup handle with attached glass beads), diverse glass and plastic beads, polyester thread, glue.  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Manon van Kouswijk Pearl Grey necklace, 2008 / Pearl Grey Revisited necklace, 2015 Glass elements (saucer, hand formed cup handle with attached glass beads), diverse glass and plastic beads, polyester thread, glue.  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

The original « Pearl Grey » of 2009 was an assemblage work consisting of found and made elements of porcelain, glass, wood, plastic and pearl. It referenced a traditional cup and saucer of which the cup had been magically replaced by a bead necklace. For this new work I have translated that idea to the typology of a glass ‘saucer and cup’. It is again a combination of found and made elements but this time the work is completely transparent; almost like an x-ray of it’s predecessor

Gésine Hackenberg Still Life, 2009 / Pink Balancing Glass brooch, 2015 Glass by Theresienthal, silver  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Gésine Hackenberg Still Life, 2009 / Pink Balancing Glass brooch, 2015 Glass by Theresienthal, silver  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

The ‘Still Life’ Brooches that I have made between 2009 and 2012 can be seen as a contemporary interpretation of 17th and 18th century Dutch Still Life paintings. This subject was preferable used to portray items of daily life that were emotionally and economically significant for people of that time.  Within my ‘Still Lifes’, I sliced existing glasswork and rearranged them into new compositions. They represented a perfect translation of the three dimensional to the two dimensional, the realistic vista of the glasses to the medium of jewellery. The body is taking on the role of the canvas as it were…  Within the new work I explored another way of looking at tableware than in a static composition: I wanted to express a certain precarious dynamic that is inherent to drinking glasses during a sociable meal. I tried to catch this moment of a glass tumbling, undecided yet if it is going to fall or stay upright.

 Sari Liimatta But I love Him object, 2005 / But they don´t love him pendant, 2015 Glass beads, metal link, thread (polyamide), a plastic toy  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Sari Liimatta But I love Him object, 2005 / But they don´t love him pendant, 2015 Glass beads, metal link, thread (polyamide), a plastic toy  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

Just as men are not just men, and women just women, meat is never just meat. It has it´s past and origin, a story which is so often simply forgotten. Living creatures which are very much alive until they are nothing more than materials, for those who still choose to use them. Even the life before their death is so often more than problematic, as we all know. As we all know.

 Annelies Planteijdt Beautiful City - Pink Stairs necklace, 2001 / Beautiful City-Pink Stairs Black Crystal necklace, 2015 Gold, Tantalum, pigment  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Annelies Planteijdt Beautiful City – Pink Stairs necklace, 2001 / Beautiful City-Pink Stairs Black Crystal necklace, 2015 Gold, Tantalum, pigment  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015 

 I started to re-consider a piece from 2001, that never has been sold, although I liked it very much, ‘Beautiful City – Pink Stairs’.  This piece is really symmetrical, so I decided to look for a way to separate it in two parts and finish both parts in a different way, in order to get two different pieces. I have re-collected parts of other (unsold) pieces from about the same time (1999 and 2000) and have been re-approaching and re-thinking them: I made ‘Crystals’ with them, like I did in my most recent work. So I have been mixing time and thinking. And size: the sizes I used earlier were different from the sizes I used in the later ‘Beautiful City’ series, they wouldn’t have fit. But because the ‘Crystals’ are liquid (they adapt to the square) the size of the elements was not importantanymore. So I could re-take these old pieces into the new time now, I have re-used them, re-connected them.
This ‘expansion’ offered me more possibilities: I re-used the material I already had without loss of material or time. The possibility to re-make the old pieces still exists. And it gave me two new pieces. So I multiplied my possibilities. A new life.

 Noon Passama Formal Research - A necklace, 2015 / Formal Research - H rings, 2015 Rigid clay, silver, gold  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Noon Passama Formal Research – A necklace, 2015 / Formal Research – H rings, 2015 Rigid clay, silver, gold  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

 Formal Research – A necklace (2015) composing of six chain units is the starting point of the group of six rings. A closed-end loop of each ring was divided in sections, one / two / three /… / six, by the difference between the fat and thin parts. The works were made under the following keywords: dividing / sequencing / sizing.
Formal Research initially focused on one classical type of jewellery: the chain. The project is mainly about the form of each connecting chain unit and how the unit connects to its neighbours.
During the sculpting process, the shapes were transformed because of them being in the hand and through time. I did not edit the outcomes and will present the rings as they are. The try-outs are the finals and vice versa.

 Stefano Marchetti Untitled brooch, 2007 / Untitled Revisited brooch, 2015 Silver, silver and titan powder, epoxy resin  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Stefano Marchetti Untitled brooch, 2007 / Untitled Revisited brooch, 2015 Silver, silver and titan powder, epoxy resin  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.:

 In the Nineties, in the making of the older brooch, my goal was to control the metal, to have the metal do whatever I wanted. In this latest brooch, made a few days ago, I let instead the metal take control over myself, and let it take me wherever its will would go.

Tore Svensson Mr. T brooch, 2011 / Mr. T Revisited brooch, 2015 (5 different versions) Veneer wood, acrylic paint, silver  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Tore Svensson Mr. T brooch, 2011 / Mr. T Revisited brooch, 2015 (5 different versions) Veneer wood, acrylic paint, silver  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

The reason why I chosen my self-portrait, is that it is probably one of my most well known pieces of jewellery. It is made in steel and etched.  The material and techniques I mostly work with. For the Re-version I saw out the silhouette in 2 mm veneer, divided the image in 3 parts and painted them in similar but for each piece different colours, before I glued them together. The fact that they are divided in three parts, with the dark sawing-line between, gives them a comic-like impression.
This impression is even emphasised by the bigger size, which is possible by the lightness of the material, and is completely different from the original steel-one. While the surface of the steel-portrait and other previous work was the key technology for building the image, the colour for some years been a part of my jewellery.

 

To revisit, remake, salvage, reinterpret, adapt, convert, converse, rethink…
  Why have we asked some of the artists we work with as gallery owners to reinterpret one of their works? We could say it’s because we’re interested in talking about time. And by “revisiting” we mean discussing the notion of time. But in what way? That’s the question.
Time passes, it is made, interpreted, felt and suffered, it escapes, drifts away, becomes trapped or stretched, sometimes it is intelligently ignored and, why not, it is exercised. Reinterpreting a work, a fiction or precis is a way of addressing time, a way of exploring a landscape in order to try and understand it. And we thought this exercise would provide an interesting opportunity to discuss time.
Revisiting in order to reflect… an exercise for the artist.
  Are there any changes in these artists’ works? Should there be? Is time involved? Without a shadow of a doubt, the answer is yes. But that barely scrapes the surface of what we want to know.
We’re more likely to find out what we want to know if the work enables us to answer questions such as: What kind of time is involved? Is there any usefulness? Is there any spirituality? Are there any aesthetics? Is there any abstraction? Is there any progress?
The exhibition is also designed to be understood through an analysis of the different types of answers provided by the works as a whole. As you will see, there are answers that simplify, offering minor changes, non-answers, coherent answers (if you have prior knowledge of the artist’s trajectory), inspired answers, uninventive answers… As we have said, evaluating the “revisits” as a whole provides additional knowledge.
When it comes down to it, what we most value is the sensation we observe and feel when the artist takes some distance and moves away from the centre stage in an attempt to provide an answer. As observers, we believe this circumstance helps to achieve universality and thus provide an intellectual satisfaction, that of communicating and objectifying the creation to the full in order to express and play with a more authentic reality.
Revisiting in order to look afresh… the viewer’s exercise.
We switch from observation to understanding, and vice versa. We observe in order to find differences between similar things and we understand when we find similarities between different things. Accustomed as we are today to viewing several pieces in a highly random fashion, pausing to stop in order to take a fresh look at a work “inaugurated” some time ago is another exercise we wish to propose. This exercise may help us assimilate better in this era of accumulation and, on occasions, superficiality. There can be no doubt that the way in which a work attracts and engages us is based on the knowledge we may have of it.
Knowledge without criticism is an indication of the end of everything. Yet, on the other hand, what can be said of criticism without knowledge? Are we capable of enjoying what these workers of art offer us? Will we be capable of evaluating what they show us? Can we offer knowledge-based criticism? Frankly, we find there is a lack of humility on the part of the viewer. And we’re all viewers.
Let’s enjoy this opportunity.

 

 

Klimt02 Gallery
Riera de Sant Miquel 65
08006 -  Barcelona
Monday to Friday / 11 -14 and 16-19 h.

 

 

 

02/08/2015

EXPO ‘SIX: new work by six young makers’ – Gallery Velvet da Vinci, San Francisco (USA) – 1-15 Aout 2015

Six: Nikki Couppee, Hunter Creel, Zachery Lechtenberg, Andrew Kuebeck, Aric Verrastro, Vincent Pontillo-Verrastro

 Artists’ Reception: Saturday, August 1, 6-8 pm
Velvet da Vinci is proud to present 6, an exhibition of jewelry and sculptural objects by six young voices in the field. Featured artists include Nikki Couppee, Hunter Creel, Zachery Lechtenberg, Andrew Kuebeck, Aric Verrastro, and Vincent Pontillo-Verrastro. Working with a range of processes and techniques, each artist brings a fresh perspective to their craft and material lineage. The show will run from August 1-15, 2015. An opening reception with the artists will take place on August 1st, from 6-8 pm.

 

Velvet da Vinci - 6: New Work by Six Young Makers -

Participating Artists:
Nikki Couppee Hunter CreelZachery LechtenbergAndrew KuebeckAric Verrastro —   Vincent Pontillo-Verrastro

 Vincent Pontillo-Verrastro "Pfoufe 6", 2015 PLA plastic, recycled fox fur, steelVincent Pontillo-Verrastro « Pfoufe 6″, 2015 PLA plastic, recycled fox fur, steel
Vincent Pontillo-Verrastro’s current presents a dialogue emphasizing the primacy of touch in experiencing jewelry, focusing on the tactile and functional properties of the brush.

Aric Verrastro, Velvet da Vinci, DriftingAric Verrastro,   Drifting – brooch
Aric Verrastro creates souvenirs in the form of jewelry, intended to capture the essence of noteworthy places and events from the past and present of the artist’s personal history. Verrastro earned undergraduate degrees in Metals/Jewelry and Studio Art from SUNY Buffalo State College. He recently earned an MFA in Metalsmithing/Jewelry at Indiana University (Bloomington, IN), where he currently serves as Associate Instructor in Metalsmithing and Jewelry Design

Nikki Couppee Necklace: Neogem, 2015 Plexiglass, brass, fine silver, sterling silver, found objectsNikki Couppee Necklace: Neogem, 2015 Plexiglass, brass, fine silver, sterling silver, found objects
Nikki Couppee’s recent work investigates the performative social functions of jewelry, utilizing Plexiglass, brass, and found objects in place of precious gems and metals. Working with everyday materials she intuitively creates her own versions of gemstones, hand cast and faceted in luminescent plastics. Couppee received an M.F.A. in Jewelry/ Metals from Kent State University, Kent, Ohio (2011) and a B.F.A. from the University of Georgia, Athens Georgia in Jewlery/Metals (2007).

Andrew Kuebeck - "second place" brooch - Sterling Silver, Fine Silver, Enamel, Toner Decal, Steel; Fabricated, Cast, Enameled, FusedAndrew Kuebeck – « second place » brooch – Sterling Silver, Fine Silver, Enamel, Toner Decal, Steel; Fabricated, Cast, Enameled, Fused
 Andrew Kuebeck , recipient of the 2012 SNAG Emerging Artist award, works in a variety of formats ranging from functional jewelry to sculptural objects and vessels. Inspired by Beefcake photography of the 1960’s and 70’s, his recent felt pieces explore the incorporation of photographic images into textiles, jewelry, and objects.

Hunter Creel "Officer Mama" 2015 copper, brass, acrylic & enamel paintHunter Creel « Officer Mama » 2015 copper, brass, acrylic & enamel paint
Hunter Creel creates bold sculptural objects, utilizing a language of simple forms drawn from the realms of the utilitarian and the abstract. Powder-coated in vibrant hues of enamel paint,

 

 

 

Velvet da Vinci
2015 Polk Street,
San Francisco, CA 94109
Phone: 415-441-0109
Email:  info@velvetdavincigallery.com
Hours: Tuesday through Saturday, 11am – 6pm, Sunday, 11am – 4pm

 

 

 

 

25/04/2015

Got the BLUES … in FELT with Charlotte Molenaar

Classé dans : Charlotte MOLENAAR (NL),COUP DE COEUR,feutre / felt,Hollande (NL) — bijoucontemporain @ 0:24

Charlotte Molenaar

Discovered thanks to  Luis Acosta next exhibition in Madrid : « Meer dan klompen en tulpen… / Más que zuecos y tulipanes… » that will held at Galería Lalabeyou from 17/09 to 18/10 – 2015  …

« Being the daughter of an arts and crafts teacher I’ve got creativity in my genes. Back at our place there was always something in the process of being made. Today my yearning to create translates into feltmaking. I feel great when I am working on my special shawls, accessories, hats and other objects in my atelier in Driebergen. This is all done after my own design. »

Charlotte Molenaar -  Delft blue blown to smithereens (necklace), 2014 felted wool with silk fabric, total length 60"Charlotte Molenaar – Delft blue blown to smithereens (necklace), 2014 felted wool with silk fabric, total length 60″

Charlotte Molenaar- Tulip mania #4 delft blue (necklace), 2015 felted wool, total length 31" Charlotte Molenaar – Tulip mania #4 delft blue (necklace), 2015 felted wool, total length 31″

Charlotte Molenaar Viltwerk - flowers necklaceCharlotte Molenaar  – flowers necklace

Charlotte Molenaar -  felt broochCharlotte Molenaar -  felt brooch

Charlotte Molenaar Viltwerk - necklace -Boulders (necklace), 2015 felted wool with silk fibers, total length 39" -  750$Charlotte Molenaar   -Boulders (necklace), 2015 felted wool with silk

25/02/2015

During SCHMUCK 2015 – EXPO ‘From the Coolest Corner – Nordic Jewellery’ – Galerie Handwerk, Munich (DE) – 6 Mars-18 Avril 2015

From the Coolest Corner – Nordic Jewellery

Galerie Handwerk 

Inauguration 5 March 2015 – 18.30 hAusstellungseröffnung Donnerstag, 5. März 2015, um 18.30 Uhr

from the coolest corner  (Lilian Eliassen Necklace: Every Road Is Just Another Way Home, 2012 Casting clay, silver)

 AND SEMINAR « Re-Public Jewellery« 
Freitag, 13. März 2015, von 10 bis 15 Uhr in der Galerie Handwerk.
Die Teilnahme ist kostenfrei.
Anmeldung erforderlich bis zum 5. März 2015 über galerie@hwk-muenchen.de oder über die Telefonnummer 089 5119-296. Nähere Informationen unter www.coolestcorner.no .
The seminar Re-public Jewellery will be held at Galerie Handwerk Friday 13 March. Four international speakers will analyze different aspects of social potential in contemporary jewellery: Liesbet Bussche (B), Helen Carnac (GB), Nanna Melland (N), Yuka Oyama (N/D). The seminar is produced by Martina Kaufmann, Prof. Ingjerd Hanevold and Prof. Anders Ljungberg at Oslo National Academy of the Arts, Metal and Jewellery Department in collaboration with The National Museum of Art, Design and Architecture and the Norwegian Association for Arts and Crafts.
The presentations made in this seminar will moderated by Sofia Bjørkmann and Prof. Anders Ljungberg. Together with the speakers and the panel-participants they will investigate strategies to convey and communicate jewellery art in public space.
Time: Friday 13 March 2015, 10 – 15
Place: Galerie Handwerk, Max-Joseph-Straße 4, Munich (map)Registration: The seminar is free of charge, but requires a registration with the Galerie Handwerk. Please register via email galerie[at]hwk-muenchen.de or phone
+49-89-5119-240 or -296.
Maximum number of participants are 90 people.
Full program in pdf

From the Coolest Corner: Nordic Jewellery presents an exciting and broad range of the contemporary studio jewellery created in the Nordic countries. From the Coolest Corner: Nordic Jewellery has a three-fold aim: to present the newest and most advanced contemporary Nordic jewellery, to intensify the discourse on today’s jewellery and strengthen the knowledge about this field, and to consolidate Nordic jewellery’s position in national and international arenas.
Jewellery will be presented in 3 different ways: a touring exhibition, a comprehensive book and an international Seminar Re-Public Jewellery, all shedding new light on the importance of this art. Denmark, Estonia, Finland, Iceland, Norway and Sweden will be the main collaborators in this project.
The touring exhibition From the Coolest Corner was opened at The National Museum – The Museum of Decorative Arts and Design in Oslo in January 2013. It then travelled to The DesignMuseum Finland in Helsinki, The Designmuseum Danmark in Copenhagen, The Estonian Museum of Applied Art and Design in Tallin, The Röhsska Museum of Design and Applied Arts in Gothenburg and The Lithuanian Art Museum in Vilnius.
During “Schmuck 2015” it is shown at the Galerie Handwerk in Munich.
This main exhibition presents 159 works by 61 artists from the Nordic countries including five invited honorary artists and a selected group of artists from Estonia.
The international seminar Re-Public Jewellery will take place on March 13th at the Galerie Handwerk, 10:00-15:00.
To strengthen the interest in and knowledge of art jewellery, artistic tendencies and research within the field will be presented both in the seminar and in the book.
All these different presentations of Nordic studio jewellery together, aim at contributing to reinforce the image of contemporary Nordic Jewellery as expressive, reflexive and “cool”.
The project is a result of a cooperation between the three Norwegian partners (The National Museum –The Museum of Decorative Arts and Design in Oslo, The Norwegian Association for Arts and Crafts and Oslo National Academy of the Arts) and their associated organizers in the Nordic museums of design and decorative arts, the Nordic crafts associations and the national colleges of art and design as well as, of course, our sponsors Nordic Culture Point, Nordic Culture Fund, Arts Council Norway.
The exhibition is sponsored by the Nordic Culture Point, the Nordic Culture Fund, the Arts Council Norway and Galerie Handwerk of the Bavarian Chamber of Crafts

From Dänemark : Julie BachKim BuckAnnette DamKaori Juzu — Marie-Louise Kristensen — Thorkild Harboe Thøgersen — Josephine Winther

  Julie Bach    Julie Bach  -bracelet

  Josephine Winther Josephine Winther Necklaces: Ding, 2011 45 bells, bronze, silver, gold, copper, porcelain, amber,agate

From Estland : Julia Maria KünnapKadri Mälk — Maarja Niinemägi — Kristi Paap — Anna-Maria Saar — Tanel Veenre

  Julia Maria Kuennap    Julia Maria Kunnap  Brooch: From the Middle of a Dream, 2010 Obsidian, gold

  Kadri Mälk Kadri Mälk

From Finnland : Ami Avellán — Aino Favén — Clarice Finell — Janne Hirvonen — Sirja Knaapi — Mervi Kurvinen –  Helena Lehtinen — Mirja Marsch — Anna RikkinenJanna Syvänoja — Monica Wickström

 Janna Syvaenoja Necklace: Untitled I, 2012 Paper, steel wire Janna Syvänoja Necklace: Untitled I, 2012 Paper, steel wire

 Helena Lehtinen  Helena Lehtinen

From Island : Hildur Yr Jónsdóttir — Hulda B. Ágústsdóttir — Helga Ragnhildur Mogensen — Orr-Kjartan Örn Kjartansson & Ástpór Helgason

Helga Ragnhildur Mogensen, ICL Nackstycke "The Red Thread", 2010, drivved, garn, silver. Helga Ragnhildur Mogensen,   Nackstycke « The Red Thread », 2010, drivved, garn, silver

From Norwegen : Liv BlåvarpSigurd Bronger – Linnéa Blakéus Calder — Lillan EliassenElise Hatlø –  Anne LégerKonrad MehusAnna Talbot — Gunnhild Tjåland

Liv Blåvarp: Red Drop, 2011. For this piece Blåvarp was awarded Bayerischer Staatspreis 2012. Photo: Liv BlåvarpLiv Blåvarp: Red Drop, 2011. For this piece Blåvarp was awarded Bayerischer Staatspreis 2012. Photo: Liv Blåvarp

  Anna Talbot (NO) Anna Talbot

From Schweden : Tobias Alm Sara Borgegård ÄlgåBeatrice BroviaNicolas ChengÅsa Elmstam –  Daniela HedmanHanna HedmanKarin Johansson Jenny KlemmingAgnieszka KnapAgnes LarssonKajsa LindbergPaula Lindblom Åsa LocknerMärta MattssonLena OlsonLina PetersonAnnika Pettersson — Margareth Sandström — Sanna SvedestedtTore SvenssonAnna Unsgaard — Peter de Wit — Annika Åkerfelt

  Agnes Larsson  Agnes Larsson

 Märta Mattsson   Märta Mattsson

 

Galerie Handwerk 
Max-Joseph-Straße 4
Eingang Ottostraße
80333 München
Tel. 089 5119-296/240
www.hwk-muenchen.de/galerie
www.facebook.de/galerie.handwerk
6 March ->18 April  (Di.- Mi.- Fr.)  10-18 h., Do. 10-20 h. – 14-16 March 10-15 h.

 

15/02/2015

Smithsonian Craft Show – Washington, DC (USA) – 23-26 Avril 2015

Classé dans : Salon,USA — bijoucontemporain @ 0:04

23-Apr-2015 – 26-Apr-2015 Smithsonian Craft Show, Washington, DC

23-Apr- 26-Apr-2015 Smithsonian Craft Show, Washington, DC

Category Jewelry : Ashley Buchanan — Namu Cho — Kate Cusack — Steven Ford & David Forlano — Maria Eife — Sandra Enterline — Pat Flynn — Donald Friedlich — Christina Goodman — Rob Greene — Valerie Hector –Ian Henderson — Reiko Ishiyama — John Iversen — Christy Klug — Loretta Lam –Seung-Hea Lee — Tara Locklear — Ken Loeber –  Aaron Macsai — Carolyn Morris Bach — Mai Orama Muniz — Emiko Oye –So Young Park — Gustav Reyes — Meghan Riley — John Ruff — Biba Schutz — Klaus Spies — Myung Urso — Kiwon Wang — Andrea Williams — Roberta & David Williamson –   Liaung Chung Yen

23-Apr- 26-Apr-2015 Smithsonian Craft Show, Washington, DC - Category: Wearable Art  Artist: DANIELLE GORI-MONTANELLI  Millions of Pencils Collar Description: Hand cut and assembled wool felt. Dimensions: H:18.00 x W:18.00 x D:4.00 InchesCategory: Wearable Art  - DANIELLE GORI-MONTANELLI  Millions of Pencils Collar – Hand cut and assembled wool felt. Dimensions: H:18.00 x W:18.00 x D:4.00 Inches

23-Apr- 26-Apr-2015 Smithsonian Craft Show, Washington, DC - here Sandra Enterline -Diamond Necklace Description: Hand fabricated kinetic mechanisms, each diamond slice is set on a two tiered component to let maximum light flow through the diamond. Each unique stone requires an individually designed setting. Diamond slices, sterling silver, 950 palladium white gold, 14k gold, stainless steel. Dimensions: H:10.00 x W:10.00 x D:0.25 InchesCategory: Jewelry –   Sandra Enterline -Diamond Necklace – Hand fabricated kinetic mechanisms, each diamond slice is set on a two tiered component to let maximum light flow through the diamond. Each unique stone requires an individually designed setting. Diamond slices, sterling silver, 950 palladium white gold, 14k gold, stainless steel. Dimensions: H:10.00 x W:10.00 x D:0.25 Inches

Category: Jewelry -  ASHLEY BUCHANAN -Iconic Decorative Necklace-Necklace hand-pierced from 20g brass then powder coated cream. Necklace design inspired by images found in historical jewelry.Dimensions: H:12.00 x W:6.50 x D:0.03 InchesCategory: Jewelry ASHLEY BUCHANANIconic Decorative Necklace – Necklace hand-pierced from 20g brass then powder coated cream. Necklace design inspired by images found in historical jewelry.Dimensions: H:12.00 x W:6.50 x D:0.03 Inches

 Category: Jewelry  Artist: SO YOUNG PARK - Red blooming-  oxidized silver, carnelian, labradorite - Technique: soldering, hammering, stone setting<br />Dimensions: H:3.50 x W:2.50 x D:1.50 Inches Category: Jewelry SO YOUNG PARK - « Red blooming »-  oxidized silver, carnelian, labradorite –Dimensions: H:3.50 x W:2.50 x D:1.50 Inches

  Category: Jewelry  Artist: REIKO ISHIYAMA  Brooch 142 Description: Made of sterling silver. Hammered, oxidized and constructed. Dimensions: H:1.00 x W:5.50 x D:3.25 InchesCategory: Jewelry  – REIKO ISHIYAMA  Brooch 142 -Made of sterling silver. Hammered, oxidized and constructed. Dimensions: H:1.00 x W:5.50 x D:3.25 Inches

Category: Jewelry  Artist: GUSTAV REYES  - Square Knot Circle Description: The Square Knot Circle piece was created by hand, using Walnut and Cherry wood. An experimental design that plays with simple shapes to create an intriguing statement piece. Gustav attempted to elevate wood to its rightful place in studio jewelry. Dimensions: H:29.00 x W:3.00 x D:1.50 InchesCategory: Jewelry  – GUSTAV REYES  - « Square Knot Circle » necklace – The Square Knot Circle piece was created by hand, using Walnut and Cherry wood. An experimental design that plays with simple shapes to create an intriguing statement piece. Gustav attempted to elevate wood to its rightful place in studio jewelry. Dimensions: H:29xW:3xD:1.50 Inches

Category: Jewelry  Artist: SEUNG-HEA LEE  - oval illusion Description: 18k gold, coral, fabrication Dimensions: H:1.00 x W:0.50 x D:0.50 InchesCategory: Jewelry  – SEUNG-HEA LEE  – « oval illusion » necklace – 18k gold, coral, fabrication Dimensions: H:1.00 x W:0.50 x D:0.50 Inches

Category: Jewelry  - BIBA SCHUTZ  - WYRED - One of a Kind Brooch - Using threads of wire I am creating the illusion of inside outside undulating forms. - Steel & sterling silver Dimensions: H:4.30 x W:3.80 x D:2.00 InchesCategory: Jewelry  – BIBA SCHUTZ  – WYRED – One of a Kind Brooch – Using threads of wire I am creating the illusion of inside outside undulating forms. – Steel & sterling silver Dimensions: H:4.30 x W:3.80 x D:2.00 Inches

Category: Jewelry  - JOHN IVERSEN  - "Hold On"- One of a kind and entirely hand constructed. In18Kt and 14Kt White, Yellow, and Green Gold. With Sterling Silver Dimensions: H:16.70 x W:4.50 x D:0.03 CmCategory: Jewelry JOHN IVERSEN  - « Hold On »- One of a kind and entirely hand constructed. In18Kt and 14Kt White, Yellow, and Green Gold. With Sterling Silver Dimensions: H:16.70 x W:4.50 x D:0.03 cm

Category: Jewelry  - MYUNG URSO  - Neckpiece - Stroke - Bold sterling silver wire forms are covered in Hanji(Korean mulberry paper) then brushed in black Asian ink and lacquered on its surface. Dimensions: H:10.75 x W:11.50 x D:1.50 InchesCategory: Jewelry  – MYUNG URSO  – Neckpiece – Stroke – Bold sterling silver wire forms are covered in Hanji(Korean mulberry paper) then brushed in black Asian ink and lacquered on its surface. Dimensions: H:10.75 x W:11.50 x D:1.50 Inches

 Category: Jewelry  - ANDREA WILLIAMS - Fringe Nest Brooch - Beach stone brooch/ pendant with layers of sweeping 18k gold  inlay. Dimensions: H:8.00 x W:8.00 x D:2.00 CmCategory: Jewelry ANDREA WILLIAMS – Fringe Nest Brooch – Beach stone brooch/ pendant with layers of sweeping 18k gold  inlay. Dimensions: H:8.00 x W:8.00 x D:2.00 Cm

Smithsonian Craft Show 2015 - WHERE

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