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16/04/2010

EXPO ‘Splendour of wearability – Leonor Hipolito’- Museu Sao Roque, Lisbonne (PT) – 25 mars-24 avril 2010

Classé dans : Exposition/Exhibition,Leonor HIPOLITO (PT),MUSEE,Portugal (PT) — bijoucontemporain @ 2:22

Leonor Hipólito : Splendour of wearability

EXPO 'Splendour of wearability - Leonor Hipolito'- Museu Sao Roque, Lisbonne (PT) - 25 mars-24 avril 2010  dans Exposition/Exhibition clip-SofW

Leonor Hipólito

« The body, borderline of two worlds, the personal and the social, became along epochs the ideal platform where emotions, relations and stories are revealed.
In a language pliant to the needs of each culture jewels charm and reflect what each of us concedes as being precious.
Taking as a starting point works of the Museum of S. Roque the interest of this project lies beyond their splendour: in what they potencially reflect, giving space for new interpretations on usage and meaning in jewellery, offering views beyond the ornamental, where the body becomes performative. »

(thanks to blog « TheneedleFiles » for the information !)

26/03/2010

EXPO ‘On the Other Hand’, Portuguese jewelers – Medellin 174 Gallery, Mexico – 14-30 Avril 2010

EXPO- ontheotherhand

This exhibition had as curators Paula Crespo (Gallery Reverso) and Miguel Matos and Elsa Garcia (Umbigo Magazine). It has launched the series of activities commemorating the fifth anniversary of PIN – Portuguese Association of Contemporary Jewellery. The result of a challenge to all PIN members, on the theme Five Fingers One Hand, the exhibition shows the work of 12 Portuguese artists, selected by Reverso and Umbigo.

Selected artists :
Alexandra Serpa Pimentel, Ana Albuquerque, Catarina Dias, Cristina Filipe, David Pontes, Dulce Ferraz, Filomena Praça, Filomeno, Inês Nunes, Leonor Hipólito, Madalena Avellar, Manuela Sousa and Paula Madeira Rodrigues. Guest artists include Marc Monzó, Catalan jeweler – invited by Paula Crespo, Portuguese fine artists Rui Effe and Carla Gaspar/Filipe Rego (Cíclope) – invited by Miguel Matos e Elsa Garcia, and Tereza Seabra and Filomeno Pereira de Sousa, honorary members of PIN.

EXPO- hand - Dulce Ferraz - RingEXPO- hand- Filomena Praça - ThimblesEXPO- hand- Filomeno -'sufficiency'- pinEXPO- hand- Paula Madeira Rodrigues - Jewel for the hand
Dulce Ferraz - Ring
Filomena Praça - Thimbles
Filomeno- ‘sufficiency’- pin
Paula Madeira Rodrigues - Jewel for the hand

 

 Evenements parallèles à « Walking the Gray Area »

Medellín 174
Col. Roma
Mexico City (MEXICO)
tel : 55740918
email : info@medellin174.com
Opening Tuesday April 13th, 7 pm

24/03/2010

EXPO ‘Walking the Gray Area’ Galeria Emilia Cohen, Mexico – 15 April-15 Mai 2010

Walking the Gray Area : A dialog on global mobility, identities and contemporary jewellery

Walking the Gray Area will premiere at Galeria Emilia Cohen in Mexico City, within the frame of the Gray Area Symposium Mexico 2010.

EXPO GRAY - Andrea Wagner Piece- Greener Grass on the Other Side 2010
Andrea Wagner Piece- Greener Grass on the Other Side 2010 – papier maché, silver, paint

Contemporary jewellery, with its exceptional ability to communicate and create associations directly connected to specific cultural and personal settings and backgrounds seems to be circumscribed to a rather westernized discourse. It has become necessary for contemporary jewellery-makers to rethink the ways they connect with others.

40 artists, from an uncertain total number of  involved countries, take a walk on the gray area and explore,  through the already ambiguous field of contemporary jewellery,  issues related to global mobility, identity and territories in dispersion and the way they perceive and have been affected by this phenomena during their rambling around the world.
Walking the Gray Area is a collective, comissioned exhibition curated by Valeria Siemelink and Andrea Wagner, that bring together 20 Latin American and 20 European jewellery makers and artists who ocationally work with jewellery as a medium, into a dialogue about jewellery, global mobility, contemporary identities and its personal and/or collective implications.

The curators of Walking the Gray Area, selected each 20 artists from their respective continents:  Latin America and Europe. The artists were individually selected based on their artistic excellence, technical abilities and creative response to various subjects. As a collective, the group was conformed based on the on the tensions between their discourses and practices, their varied and experimental approach in the use of materials and techniques and on the rich possibilities that lay on the exchange among them. There is, however, one thing that all the invited artists have in common : like the curators, they are or have all been migrants; born in one place, living, working or studying in another one.

The artists work in couples and were paired randomly: the names of the Latin American artists were written on a piece of paper, which was folded and placed in a bowl. The same was done with the names of the European artists. The curators had fun taking turns to pick a name from one bowl and pairing it with a name from the other bowl. 20 couples were formed and, for the last six months they carried out a dialogue through the pages of a weblog specially created for this purpose. The artists conducted their dialogues in ways they find interesting or relevant: exchanging conversations, stories, images and even materials. Besides their periodical postings in the blog, the artists exchanged letters and parcels through the post, organized Skype sessions, phoned and even meet in person. The weblog has allowed the artists to reach a diverse, distant and growing audience, having attracted over 10 thousand visitors from nearly 90 countries.

Through the exchange both artists and curators aimed to respond to a variety of questions: How do they respond to changing definitions of mobility, locality, globalism, migration?  How do the changing conceptions of identities relate to their being and practice? How do they reconcile their roots with their routes? What kind of exchange can take place between artists from areas of the world where contemporary jewellery is perceived and dealt with in such different ways? How can they relate to and diverse, moving, fast changing audience?

EXPO GRAY - Helena Biermann Angel- Piece- Sabor a Ti 2010 EXPO GRAY- Agnieszka KNAP- Necklace- The Grass is Not Greener on the Other Side of the Fence 2010EXPO GRAY- Alejandra Solar - piece 2010EXPO GRAY- Carolina HORNAUER - necklace 'el Coleccionista' 2010

Helena Biermann Angel-  set of pendants  ‘Sabor a Ti’ 2010 – glass vials, fruit seeds, quartz, cotton, wood box
Agnieszka KNAP- Necklace- The Grass is Not Greener on the Other Side of the Fence 2010- silver, copper, enamel
Alejandra Solar – piece 2010 – wood, print, cotton pendants
Carolina HORNAUER - necklace ‘el Coleccionista’ 2010 Hair, cotton, fresh water pearls, patina, steel, cooper, enamel, magnets, burnt wood, silver, stone

EXPO GRAY- Peter HOOGEBOOM - pi 2010' necklace- Ceramics, nyEXPO GRAY- Theri Tolvanen-  brooch 'Chenonceau'Mirla Fernandes 'Riv Anda Hit' 2010 - latex, pigments -EXPO GRAY -EXPO GRAY- Valentina Rosenthal -necklaces.jpg

Peter HOOGEBOOM – pi 2010′ necklace- Ceramics, nylon, alpaca, gold leaf
Terhi Tolvanen- Cherry wood, paint, beads, gold, silver – brooch ‘Chenonceau’
Mirla Fernandes ‘Riv Anda Hit’ 2010 – latex, pigments
Valentina Rosenthal - Silver, wood, nails, glass, porcelain, bronz, mirror, enamel necklaces 

 

Artists:
Miguel Luciano (puerto rico) & Leonor Hipolito (portugal), Ketli Tiitsar (estonia) & Chequita Nahar (surinam), Karin Seufert (germany) & María Constanza Ochoa (colombia), Célio Braga (brazil) & Gemma Draper (spain). Carla Castaigo (portugal) & Valentina Rosenthal (chile), Francisca Kweitel (argentina) & Nelli Tanner (finland), Maria Jose Fabrega (costa rica) & Agnieszka Knap (poland), Andrea Wagner (netherlands) & Carolina Hornauer (chile), Susanne Klemm (netherlands) & Samantha Fung (venezuela), Jorge Manilla (mexico) & Christoph Zellweger (switzerland), Luzia Vogt (switzerland) &  Thelma Aviani (brazil), Terhi Tolvanen (finland) & Guigui Kohon (argentina), Helena Biermann Angel (colombia) & Hanna Hedman (sweden), Mia Maljojoki (germany) & Alejandra Solar (mexico), Mirla Fernandes (brazil) & Kajsa Lindberg (sweden), Dani Soter (brazil) & Sebastian Buescher (uk), Ineke Heerkens (netherlands) & Julieta Odio (costa rica), Walka Studio (chile) & Natalie Luder (switzerland), Eduardo Graue (mexico) & Peter Hoogeboom (netherlands), Jantje Fleischhut (netherlands) & Andres Fonseca (colombia).

Karin SEUFERT- Piece '9 Brooches'  2010- pvc, cotton, steel, silver
Karin SEUFERT- Piece ’9 Brooches’  2010- pvc, cotton, steel, silver

Gemma Draper 01
 Gemma Draper – Electroformed Copper, Enamel and Wood – 2008

Galeria Emilia Cohen
Palmas 1320
Lomas – Mexico City (Mexico)
Tel : +52 55 5281 0009
Tel : +52 55 5281 0029
mail: info@otro-diseno.com
website: http://www.emiliacohen.com/

18/02/2010

EXPO ‘Walking the Gray Area’ Galeria La Refaccionaria, Mexico – April 2010

Curated by Mexican architect and curator Valeria Vallarta Siemelink and German artist and curator Andrea Wagner, Walking the Gray Area will show works by 20 artists from their respective continents : Latin America and Europe.

leonor_hipolito - brooch

Leonor Hipolito (PT)’s jewelry Red rose or body part?

From Walking the Gray Area:

Each artist has a unique approach to jewellery: different ideas, different interests, different materials and techniques, different countries. But all artists have one thing in common: like the curators themselves, they are or have all been migrants: born in one place, living/working/studying in another one.

The artists have been paired randomly : the names of the Latin American artists were written on a piece of paper, which was folded and placed in a bowl. The same was done with the names of the European artists. The curators had fun taking turns to pick a name from one bowl and pairing it with a name from the other bowl. 20 couples were formed and they will carry out both verbal and visual dialogues through a blog that has been created for this purpose.

The artists have been individually selected based on their artistic excellence, technical abilities and creative response to diverse subjects. As a collective, the group has been selected based on the great differences between their work, their varied and experimental approach in the use of materials and techniques and on the rich possibilities that lay on the exchange among them. Each artist will create an individual piece of jewellery as a product of the dialogue.

The resulting exhibition, Walking the Gray Area, will be presented at the Symposium Gray Area, Encounter of Contemporary Jewellery between Latin America and Europe in Mexico City in April of 2010. The exhibition will be presented at Galeria La Refaccionaria in Mexico City.

heranca_necklace_porcelain_mirla_fernandes.jpgnecklace_jorge_manilla.jpg

Mirla Fernandes (Brazil) – Heranca Necklace (latex, paint, porcelain)
Jorge Manilla (Mexico/Belgium) Necklace

 

en parallèle à l’expo de la galerie « La Refaccionaria », symposium :

« Gray Area, First International Encounter Of Contemporary Jewellery Latin America – Europa »

 

http://www.grayareasymposium.org/about/en/
info@grayareasymposium.org

What does Contemporary Jewellery mean ?

 What does Contemporary Jewellery mean?

Benjamín Lignel Bethel, Metalsmith Magazine, 2006

The following question is part of a questionnaire sent by the Italian Association for Contemporary Jewellery to its members : Italy and France, whilst boasting a long history in high-end jewellery, by and large remained untouched by the experimental jewellery movements of the ’60s (most active in the US, England, and Holland). Today, the studio Jewellery community in both countries remains small, and I found from experience that the otherwise simple task of defining one’s activity is unexpectedly daunting for us, and continues to fuel many of our conversations.

This is a ‘French’ answer to an Italian question, written in English: a nice metaphor for our international community of gold-tinklers, but one which complicates the task of defining jewellery – the English use alternatively design jewellery and contemporary jewellery, the French may say creation (i.e. creative) jewellery, the Italians art goldsmithing, while American readers will prefer art or studio jewelry. Having trained in the UK (and to simplify matters), I used the expression Contemporary Jewellery, though, as you will see, I am not at all convinced that it does the profession much justice.

What does Contemporary Jewellery mean ? dans Benjamin LIGNEL (FR) police_state_badge

William Clark Police State Badge, 1970 and 2005 Sterling silver, 10k gold
Photo: Richard Matzinger

What does Contemporary Jewellery mean?

Not very much, to anyone outside the profession; but the question is a helpful reminder that:
1. In most countries, the debate will never find an audience outside the actual community that launched it.
2. This is a simplistic label, falling short of the profession’s complex heritage and range of interests.
But it’s a tricky one, and I tried to list some of the ways one could answer it:

Contemporary Jewellery is a type of practice – understood as the contemporary offspring of a craft-based design activity that finds its origin in medieval workshops. Such a definition stresses contemporary jewellery’s historical past, and finds antecedents in the British and American Arts & Crafts movements, the renewed late XIXth century interest in manual skills (as a last stand against industrialisation), and the emergence of radical jewellery movements in the 60s: it underlines the notions of individuality, craftsmanship, and its troubled relationship to the production mainstream;

or a type of object: poised between high-street jewellery and art (the former’s glorified other, the latter’s poor relative), we know what it’s not (‘just’ manufactured artifacts for wearing), and what it wants to be (the expression of individual talent that reflects on, and sometimes influences, contemporary culture), much less what it is.

happy_family dans Estela Saez VILANOVA (ES)

Benjamin Lignel – Happy family NHS (two adhesive rings), 2002 Rubber, gauze, ink
Edition of 300 – Photo: Joel Degen

A few distinctive characteristics, however, seem to be beyond debate: the human body as a general working area; an open attitude to methods and material that echoes art’s own agenda, complicated by the notion of wearability; the distinctiveness we associate with individual expression; and an emancipation from consumer goods’ vocation to ‘just’ satisfy consumer desires.

It could also be defined as a market (I follow here the argument that cultural artifacts are defined less by methods of production than by distribution, accessibility and ultimately, potential impact on a larger consumer base). In most countries, a limited number of galleries take care of both distribution and promotion – while the designer-maker is expected (if (s)he wants to make a living) to be represented by at least five galleries, and complement consignment sales by direct, off-the-anvil transactions. From my point of view, the Contemporary Jewellery market works in ways similar to the art market, but on a scale so small, that its lack of visibility questions its existence.

hand dans Leonor HIPOLITO (PT)

Estela Saez Vilanova – GBN  -Silver, wool, paint

So then: most jewellers would agree that Contemporary Jewellery is a fast-evolving profession at a crossroad between craft, design, and art, currently ridged by identity concerns. However, I think that the problem, rather than one of identity, is one of image. Although the lack of an established definition has contributed to an extremely rich range of output -personal answers to a collective question- it seems that diversity stands in the way of a more cohesive front, one that would focus on explaining to people that there is a life after Cartier, Pomellato and Tiffany’s. And the unsuspecting public still lumps the practice together with its craft-based past, judges its production on a par with high-end (or any other) jewellery, and considers artistic ambition rather like a presumptuous fancy (unless one equates artistic with skilled, meaningful or committed to self-expression).

bag dans Mirla FERNANDES (BR)

Mirla Fernandes – Fe 2008 Latex and mineral pgiments

This happens at least for two reasons:

Firstly, there are not enough of us to rally a larger population to Contemporary Jewellery’s standards: exposure is limited by the output (there are comparatively few jewellery design programs, fewer graduates that stick to the trade, and not many pieces produced per year per jeweller). This scarcity of active jewellery makers is further complicated by our cultural antagonism with serial reproduction -and therefore, bigger distribution 1). A cynical bystander would add: this is a micro-profession, which means little appeal to the press, anemic cultural budgets, no specific courses in the history of Contemporary Jewellery (to my knowledge), and therefore, no history. As a result, Contemporary Jewellery is always deemed a subsidiary activity, on the margin of mainstream jewellery creation. Secondly, designer-makers are by nature a/o trade, uncommunicative, or certainly not prone to enthusiastic pamphlet scribbling. Who’s ever heard of Contemporary Jewellery, outside its confidential network of galleries and specialized clientèle?

Leonor dans Reflexion

Leonor Hipolito – Sin titulo – Silver, cotton

The situation, and this is my point, demands more than just communication: instead of shunning assertive promotion/information strategies (for fear of contamination?), we must resist inertia from within and without that confine Contemporary Jewellery to its ill-defined (but restricting) marginal position, and explore new means of proliferation.

So we should communicate more. And explain our intentions. But in the end, let us not be too intent on defining our practice as one thing only: if anything, I would even drop the Contemporary or Studio used to qualify this jewellery: whatever specific meaning it may have had is now superseded by a vague sense of institutionalized otherness.

Let’s be proud, and call it jewellery.

n623746066_1377937_1633
« Let’s be proud, and call it jewellery«  (photo Sandra Kocjančič)

 

 

About the Author : Benjamin Lignel (1972) first trained in philosophy & literature, then in art history, at New York University, and finally in furniture and jewellery design, at the Royal College of Art in London. Hence his interest in the functional object, complicated by a penchant for art, and further perverted by sustained exposures to literary works, often momentous, sometimes pertinent.

 

 

 

 


 Footnote1) The dominant discourse by jewellers and gallerists alike tend to equate value with uniqueness. While the argument certainly has weight from a mercantile point of view, it seems very outdated when applied to artistic value: not only have multiple editions (either executed by fine artists or copied from original work) been produced since the XVth century, as a way to reach a wider audience, but anyone in today’s contemporary art world trying to champion a pre-Warholian superiority of the unique, hand-made piece would be laughed at. 

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