BIJOU_CONTEMPORAIN

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16/07/2016

DECOUVERTE : Iliana Tosheva

Classé dans : COUP DE COEUR,DECOUVERTE,Iliana TOSHEVA (BG/UK),www Klimt02 — bijoucontemporain @ 2:28

Iliana Tosheva

from « rough » to translucent  ‘Rockscape’ Collection

Iliana Tosheva is an artist based in UK with a background in English Literature. Tosheva developed her portfolio « Surgery Course » at Central St Martins College of Art and Design and has been exploring organic and minimalistic shapes. Her main inspiration is the nature and the textures created by the artist reflect this.

Central St Martins College of Art and Design, London, UK

« After a long career in languages, I started devoting more and more time to jewellery making to a point at which I realized that this is what I want to follow as a profession.
As an artist and creator I dislike staying the same size and what has permanently inspired me over the years has always been a fleeting image of a less traditional shape, texture or colour that will take my breath away on a journey ‘back to nature’ no matter how trivial the cliché might sound! Form, shape and texture wise, my work is mimicking nature at its best!
I work in sterling silver, fine silver, 18 karat gold and vitreous enamel. My signature piece is reticulated and blackened organic shaped ring/earrings/brooch. »

Iliana Tosheva Ring: Untitled, 2015 Blackened sterling silver, hand carved translucent bio resin: Iliana Tosheva Ring: Untitled, 2015 Blackened sterling silver, hand carved translucent bio resin:

Iliana Tosheva Ring: 18K Yellow Gold and Bio Resin Ring, 2015 18K sand textured yellow gold, translucent bio resin: Iliana Tosheva Ring: 18K Yellow Gold and Bio Resin Ring, 2015 18K sand textured yellow gold, translucent bio resin

Iliana Tosheva Brooch: Untitled, 2016 Bio resin, 24K yellow gold leaf: Iliana Tosheva Brooch: Untitled, 2016 Bio resin, 24K yellow gold leaf

Iliana Tosheva Brooch: Untitled, 2016 Bio resin, 24K yellow gold leaf: Iliana Tosheva Brooch: Untitled, 2016 Bio resin, 24K yellow gold leaf

Iliana Tosheva Brooch: Smokey, 2016 Bio resin: Iliana Tosheva Brooch: Smokey, 2016 Bio resin

Iliana Tosheva Brooch: Rockscape, 2016 Bio resin Approx. 8 x 5 x 3.5cm: Iliana Tosheva Brooch: Rockscape, 2016 Bio resin Approx. 8 x 5 x 3.5cm

Iliana Tosheva - Bio Resin 'Pebble' Ring: Iliana Tosheva – Bio Resin ‘Pebble’ Ring

Iliana Tosheva Piece: Untitled, 2014 Reticulated and blackened sterling silver Organic Ring/Pendant: Iliana Tosheva Piece: Untitled, 2014 Reticulated and blackened sterling silver Organic Ring/Pendant

Iliana Tosheva Brooch: Untitled, 2014 Copper mesh, vitreous enamel 10 cm x 8 cm: Iliana Tosheva Brooch: Untitled, 2014 Copper mesh, vitreous enamel 10 cm x 8 cm:

Enregistrer

25/08/2015

COUP de COEUR … Carrie Dickens

Carrie Dickens

Discovered thanks to MARZEE graduation show 2015 where her jewels are presented ….

And on her page on RCA (Royal College of Art) work 2015, it begins PERFECTLY for me : « It all begins with touch. »
and on her website, the same : « jewellery that touches back »

« I believe the physical ‘touch’ of jewellery has powerful potential to change the way we feel about ourselves and the world around us. My work investigates tactile potential, especially for soothing comfort: I aim for sense-full surfaces, nuzzling and strokeable textures, enveloping experience. I aim for jewellery that touches back. »

OOOOH YES !!! sooo important notion for me !

« This exploration follows directly from the research I undertook for my MA dissertation and my experimental installation which invited people to ‘wear’ pebbles suspended from the ceiling.  With this series I’m aiming for a nurturing, nestling, comforting nuzzle. »

Marzee graduation show 2015 - Carrie Dickens - Royal College of Art, Londonat Marzee graduation show 2015Carrie Dickens – Royal College of Art, London (photo Koen Jacobs Jewellery)

 

 Carrie Dickens Carrie Dickens

Carrie Dickens - untitled necklace,  - nylon, sterling silver, magnets 300 x 300 x 100mmCarrie Dickens - untitled necklace,  – nylon, sterling silver, magnets 300 x 300 x 100mm

 chip II (on my shoulder), Carrie Dickens nylon, sterling silver, magnets 100 x 70 x 70mmCarrie Dickens- chip II (on my shoulder), nylon, sterling silver, magnets 100 x 70 x 70mm

 Carrie Dickens - long brooch, nylon, sterling silver 400 x 60 x 40 mm Carrie Dickens – long brooch, nylon, sterling silver 400 x 60 x 40 mm

 

16/03/2015

After Identity Crisis: Ceci n’est pas “art jewellery” (2/4) by Ezra Satok-Wolman

Classé dans : Ezra SATOK-WOLMAN (CA),Reflexion,www Klimt02 — bijoucontemporain @ 21:39

« For real change to occur, action needs to take place. My intention with “Identity Crisis” was to drop a pebble into the water and hope that some of the ripples turned into waves. It is in that spirit that I am publishing this follow up essay.
(This is the second part of a text that will be published in 4 individual texts. Read the previous article: Part 1 ) »

After Identity Crisis: Ceci n’est pas “art jewellery” (2/4).

There are galleries, fairs, exhibitions, university programs, museum collections and stacks of books dedicated to art jewellery.  Art jewellery has gone global.  So how can art jewellery be dead?  The reality is art jewellery isn’t dead, but it has become unrecognizable.  One of the biggest problems that I see today is that art jewellery has become an “umbrella term,” used to refer to a number of different types of jewellery and philosophies about jewellery that collectively create a fairly schizophrenic personality.  It might be more appropriate to suggest that art jewellery has multiple personalities and may at times present itself as craft jewellery, alternative jewellery, or small scale conceptual art (that may or may not function as jewellery at all).

  • One of the biggest problems that I see today is that art jewellery has become an “umbrella term,” used to refer to a number of different types of jewellery and philosophies about jewellery that collectively create a fairly schizophrenic personality

Art jewellery should be more successful today than it has ever been, yet we have continued to slump even further into decline as the field has grown and as time has passed.  Our tendency has been to look for external reasons for our struggles, but I believe it is time we accept that the problems lie within what art jewellery has come to be, rather than factors that have impacted it.  We can no longer blame an unstable economy for the lack of art jewellery sales because the jewellery market in general is booming.  In a recent article about the Birmingham School of Jewellery’s 125th anniversary, Professional Jeweller Magazine1 reported that the UK has seen consistent growth in the jewellery and watch industry since 2009 valuing it today at £5 billion annually.  Why then has art jewellery struggled so terribly?  The contemporary art world is also booming, and it shouldn’t be so crazy to think that art jewellery should be enjoying similar success.  I can’t help but think that the problem must lie within the realm of art jewellery itself because things seem to be fine in the outside world.

  • The extremist approach to art jewellery has guided artists to become consumed with trying to reinvent jewellery, rather than focus on making jewellery art that other people will both react to and want to wear

The problems that have arisen regarding art jewellery’s sustainability may have more to do with issues that are not fundamentally relevant to jewellery at all, but rather relate to radical ideologies about art jewellery that have heavily influenced trends within the field.  We have allowed extremism and dogmatism to take the reigns and now find ourselves asking how we got here.  It is not that people don’t want to buy art jewellery, but perhaps more likely that people don’t want to buy this art jewellery.  The extremist approach to art jewellery has guided artists to become consumed with trying to reinvent jewellery, rather than focus on making jewellery art that other people will both react to and want to wear.  Looking at the full spectrum of what is produced today under the guise of art jewellery might have you questioning how many artists are capable of actually producing good functional jewellery.  Experimentation seems to take precedence over technique. “Narratives” and “concept” have become far more important than the end result.  Craftsmanship and attention to detail seem to be a thing of the past, and too much of either could have people telling you that you’re not an artist at all.  Ted Noten recently spoke about being criticized for this as an art student in a recent interview with The New York Times2 and was quoted saying; “if you want to be an artist you should have the tools and skills to make something.  If you want to come up with concepts, be a writer.”

While I am a dedicated supporter of art jewellery in all forms, the field could certainly benefit from some distinctions being made between the kinds of art jewellery being produced right now.   As art jewellery has grown and developed, a number of facets have taken shape and the term art jewellery has come to represent a diverse range of things, including at times costume, multi-media installations and performance art.  It may be unfair to say that art jewellery in general has failed or has become irrelevant, because some facets are doing much better than others.  There are certain kinds of art jewellery that will always appeal to the market better than others.  There are tremendous differences between the kind of customer that is looking for a highly conceptual piece of “jewellery art” for their private collection, and the customer that is looking for a piece of art jewellery to wear.  I am fairly confident that the number of customers looking to purchase well made art jewellery that can be worn will always outnumber those looking to buy unwearable or overly conceptual pieces that can not be worn.  For the purposes of clear communication and good marketing, it might not be such a bad idea to represent this kind of highly conceptual work separately altogether.  While there may be a place for conceptual jewellery within the spectrum of art jewellery, to have expectations that it will have success on its own commercially may still be unrealistic.

Beyond highly conceptual jewellery, the need to distinguish between art jewellery and craft jewellery is also crucial.  For too long we have allowed serial and edition craft work to masquerade as art jewellery.  Too many makers have resorted to focussing on multiple “editions” or serial work, which may appeal to requests from galleries for “new collections,” but often devalues the pieces overall.   As more makers attend fairs to exhibit and sell their work, art jewellery has been altered to fit the needs of the wholesale format.  Once again this is very reminiscent of craft jewellery, as artists look for ways to produce inexpensive multiples and work within margins.  The market is changing for galleries too, many of which are now spending a good amount of time in the field attending fairs themselves.  Contemporary art and design fairs have become hotbeds of activity for both artists and galleries, but it’s still too soon to say what kind of support will be cultivated in the form of new followers and collectors.

  •  Ultimately it is the audience or market that determines the value of the art we make.  We can only sell our pieces for what people are willing to pay, if they are willing to pay anything at all. 

I often hear people proclaiming that more art jewellery isn’t purchased because the audience isn’t educated, and doesn’t understand the value of what they are looking at.  I happen to disagree with this statement and have found quite the opposite in my experience.  People who have an interest in art jewellery tend to be quite educated.  They also tend to have both an understanding of, and appreciation for art and craftsmanship.  Ultimately it is the audience or market that determines the value of the art we make.  We can only sell our pieces for what people are willing to pay, if they are willing to pay anything at all.  Regardless of how educated the audience is or isn’t, they directly contribute to the valuation and commercial success or failure of an artist’s work, more so than galleries do.  You can’t fake craftsmanship, and it’s something that people have simply come to expect when it comes to jewellery whether you work in gold, plastic, paper or textile.

  • It may be fair to say that there is currently a lot of good craft jewellery and conceptual art being made by people who call themselves jewellery artists.  But calling something art jewellery and something actually being art jewellery are two very different things.

Art jewellery has changed dramatically over the last decade.  When I think back to what art jewellery was about when I first became interested in it, I remember a vastly different landscape.  Fundamentally speaking, art jewellery was about artists making jewellery.  The art jewellery movement began when artists who were highly skilled jewellery makers, started exploring different approaches to jewellery making that were outside the traditional boundaries of conventional jewellery. These artists experimented with various kinds of materials, forms, and techniques, developing a field that at the time was quite radical.  Art jewellery was about more than stringing together bits and pieces, or assembling collections of found objects.  Using alternative materials, casual construction, and giving the piece a socio-political title was not enough to qualify something as art jewellery.  It may be fair to say that there is currently a lot of good craft jewellery and conceptual art being made by people who call themselves jewellery artists.  But calling something art jewellery and something actually being art jewellery are two very different things.

  • Virtual success is measured by social media ratings which in turn has only fed our need for instant gratification.  In a “fast food” like manner we are constantly bombarded with content, giving us little time to digest between servings.

Before the internet became a mainstream resource and tool for communication, the information available about art jewellery was not only limited, but carefully curated as well.  “Information” came in the form of physical exhibitions, books and magazines.  There were no websites or blogs and therefore information was available periodically and for the most part regionally.  Today we each have our own websites or social media “channels,” and information is made available in real-time.  New work is “published” daily and essentially with little to no filter.  The internet has become the ultimate platform for the work we produce, providing artists with the ability to virtually exhibit and sell their work to a global marketplace.  Virtual success is measured by social media ratings which in turn has only fed our need for instant gratification.  In a “fast food” like manner we are constantly bombarded with content, giving us little time to digest between servings.

The art jewellery spectrum has been stretched beyond imagination.  Sometimes it seems as though artists are merely competing to see who can take jewellery to the furthest points of abstraction, physically and philosophically, while others compete to see who can use or repurpose the most obscure materials or objects in a quest to create the “nouvo-collage” on a pin or a string.  This is a complete departure from what art jewellery is intended to be, and a departure that I attribute in part to extremism.  Extremism has convinced students year after year that in order to succeed as a jewellery artist, they must reinvent art jewellery  and the materials they use to create it.  Extremism has replaced skill and technique with ego and shock value.  While I have seen some very interesting and thought provoking things arise from this extremist approach to art jewellery over the years, I would venture to say that it is work of the “extremist art jeweller” that could be pronounced dead rather than art jewellery in general.  If you look at the ideologies at either end of the “art jewellery spectrum,” what you will find are extreme interpretations of jewellery that may not have much potential for commercial success.

In my opinion, if you remove the craft jewellery, alternative jewellery, and the extreme conceptual jewellery from the mix, there really isn’t a tremendous amount of art jewellery being produced, and much of it probably does quite well in terms of sales.  The “art jewellery umbrella” currently covers a lot of work by default that quite frankly would be more accurately described as something else.  A good example of this dynamic exists at Sieraad Art Fair, the annual event in Amsterdam dedicated to art jewellery.  It was my experience at Sieraad that while there was some art jewellery at the fair, the work was primarily a mix of craft jewellery, alternative jewellery and highly conceptual jewellery.  I believe  Ward Schriver was making the same declaration in his review of the 2013 edition of the fair for Art Jewelry Forum,3 in which he concluded by saying; “If you are keen on seeing, and possibly buying, a great diversity of affordable, “modern” jewelry, you’ll have a field day at Sieraad.”

  • Many artists no longer think enough about who or if anyone will ever wear their jewellery, which has led to a complete disconnect with the wearer

Today’s iteration of art jewellery has been diluted.  Our standards have simply been watered down. Craftsmanship, functionality, and synthesis of concept and form are no longer important when assessing the success or failure of a piece. Photographs and artist’s statements have become more valuable currency than the objects themselves, often obscuring the true nature of the pieces they document, or how well or poorly they are made. The foundation skills necessary for making jewellery  are no longer required to make art jewellery, or so it would seem.  Some groups will tell you that a piece of art jewellery need not function as jewellery at all, as long as the intention exists.  Many artists no longer think enough about who or if anyone will ever wear their jewellery, which has led to a complete disconnect with the wearer.  Artists no longer produce jewellery for people to wear, but rather to build portfolios and develop their own artistic identities.  The wearer or end user has been erased from the equation, and herein lies another one of our critical dilemmas.  Jewellery is something that people need to have a very personal and individual connection with, much more so than art which is generally intended for a broader public audience.  Finding a happy medium can often be the biggest challenge when making art jewellery and must at least begin with a desire to do so.

1 Professional Jeweller – Jan 23, 2015, by Sarah Louise Jordan
http://www.professionaljeweller.com/article-15570-why-birmingham-is-boosting-the-jewellery-industry/

The New York Times – Dec 4, 2014, by Nina Siegal
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/05/style/international/ted-noten-jewelry-artist-brings-macabre-art-to-miami.html?_r=1

3 Art Jewelry Forum – Dec 23, 2013, by Ward Schriver
http://www.artjewelryforum.org/conference-fair-reviews/the-sieraad-fair-in-amsterdam

published by Klimt02

After Identity Crisis: Introduction (1/4) by Ezra Satok-Wolman

Classé dans : Ezra SATOK-WOLMAN (CA),Reflexion,www Klimt02 — bijoucontemporain @ 21:31

« For real change to occur, action needs to take place. My intention with “Identity Crisis” was to drop a pebble into the water and hope that some of the ripples turned into waves. It is in that spirit that I am publishing this follow up essay. »

 After Identity Crisis: Introduction (1/4).Ezra Satok-Wolman

Art Jewellery is Dead.”  That’s how all of this began.  With an absurd statement, that after careful scrutiny, may have been nothing more than a wakeup call from someone who really knows what this movement is supposed to be all about.  In fact, what has transpired is nothing more than a frantic call for the defibrillator, and a huge gasp for air.  Resuscitation alone is not enough however.  Art Jewellery is in need of a transfusion and an injection of new fresh blood.  Art Jewellery isn’t dead; it is hiding from its own “identity.”  For fear that it looks in the mirror only to realize that it still has a tremendous amount of growing up to do.  The Dogmas and narrow minded curating of Art Jewellery over the last decade or more have led us to question whether we even have a future as a field.

Over the years I have developed a network of friends and colleagues in the Americas, Europe, and Asia who will all tell you that Art Jewellery is alive and well.  It might not be what you think it is anymore, but a new “identity” is being revealed.  It will be immediately recognizable and you won’t have to ask yourself “is that Art Jewellery?”  Real Art Jewellery slaps you in the face. It makes you feel something.  You might find yourself proclaiming “I have to have that” before you’ve even had time to think, or ask how much it costs.  Anyone who has ever bought a piece of Art Jewellery knows this feeling.  It is an indescribable feeling.  It is amazement that you can affix to your body and show off to the world as your latest discovery.  Ask yourself when the last time you experienced this was and you will soon realize how scarce real Art Jewellery has become.  That is one of the biggest problems we face with Art Jewellery today.

We have come so far, and yet perhaps we have only scratched the surface.  Why stop here?  Things got difficult, and now we’re all just supposed to pack it in?  No way.  Its time to clean house and get things in order.  But if we want to ensure the survival of this movement, we must ensure that our mission statement is clear, that we have realistic goals, and that we celebrate excellence, not mediocrity.  As long as artists create jewellery, an art jewellery movement will exist.  It is entirely up to us however, to determine how successful and prolific we will be as a field.

In October, 2014 I travelled to China where I was invited to serve as one of the art directors for the Shanghai Jewellery Art Exhibition at Shanghai Design Week. I was also invited to present a lecture at Design Week, and asked to specifically speak about finding a balance between artistic expression and commercial success. That lecture was presented a second time to the jewellery department at Wuhan University of Engineering Sciences several days later. The lectures, as well as this essay, have been developed from the notes that I will share with you over the course of this text.  We will look back at the more successful periods that Art Jewellery has enjoyed and try to determine what has changed.  We will also look at how a redivision of the branches of Art Jewellery may help us more accurately understand and communicate with our target markets.

While I certainly don’t claim to have all the answers, I am prepared to share my thoughts and feelings on these subjects in an effort to keep a healthy dialogue flowing.  My end goal is to ensure the survival and success of the field we all work within, and my hope is that we all benefit from reviving this important movement.  I received an overwhelmingly positive response to my last essay “Identity Crisis,”which was a call to action, in an effort to change things before its too late.  But it doesn’t just end with essays, declarations and manifestos.

For real change to occur, action needs to take place.  My intention with “Identity Crisis” was to drop a pebble into the water and hope that some of the ripples turned into waves.  It is in that spirit that I am publishing this follow up essay.

Art Jewellery is Dead.”  That’s how all of this began.  With an absurd statement, that after careful scrutiny, may have been nothing more than a wakeup call from someone who really knows what this movement is supposed to be all about.  In fact, what has transpired is nothing more than a frantic call for the defibrillator, and a huge gasp for air.  Resuscitation alone is not enough however.  Art Jewellery is in need of a transfusion and an injection of new fresh blood.  Art Jewellery isn’t dead; it is hiding from its own “identity.”  For fear that it looks in the mirror only to realize that it still has a tremendous amount of growing up to do.  The Dogmas and narrow minded curating of Art Jewellery over the last decade or more have led us to question whether we even have a future as a field.

Over the years I have developed a network of friends and colleagues in the Americas, Europe, and Asia who will all tell you that Art Jewellery is alive and well.  It might not be what you think it is anymore, but a new “identity” is being revealed.  It will be immediately recognizable and you won’t have to ask yourself “is that Art Jewellery?”  Real Art Jewellery slaps you in the face. It makes you feel something.  You might find yourself proclaiming “I have to have that” before you’ve even had time to think, or ask how much it costs.  Anyone who has ever bought a piece of Art Jewellery knows this feeling.  It is an indescribable feeling.  It is amazement that you can affix to your body and show off to the world as your latest discovery.  Ask yourself when the last time you experienced this was and you will soon realize how scarce real Art Jewellery has become.  That is one of the biggest problems we face with Art Jewellery today.

We have come so far, and yet perhaps we have only scratched the surface.  Why stop here?  Things got difficult, and now we’re all just supposed to pack it in?  No way.  Its time to clean house and get things in order.  But if we want to ensure the survival of this movement, we must ensure that our mission statement is clear, that we have realistic goals, and that we celebrate excellence, not mediocrity.  As long as artists create jewellery, an art jewellery movement will exist.  It is entirely up to us however, to determine how successful and prolific we will be as a field.

In October, 2014 I travelled to China where I was invited to serve as one of the art directors for the Shanghai Jewellery Art Exhibition at Shanghai Design Week. I was also invited to present a lecture at Design Week, and asked to specifically speak about finding a balance between artistic expression and commercial success. That lecture was presented a second time to the jewellery department at Wuhan University of Engineering Sciences several days later. The lectures, as well as this essay, have been developed from the notes that I will share with you over the course of this text.  We will look back at the more successful periods that Art Jewellery has enjoyed and try to determine what has changed.  We will also look at how a redivision of the branches of Art Jewellery may help us more accurately understand and communicate with our target markets.

While I certainly don’t claim to have all the answers, I am prepared to share my thoughts and feelings on these subjects in an effort to keep a healthy dialogue flowing.  My end goal is to ensure the survival and success of the field we all work within, and my hope is that we all benefit from reviving this important movement.  I received an overwhelmingly positive response to my last essay “Identity Crisis,”which was a call to action, in an effort to change things before its too late.  But it doesn’t just end with essays, declarations and manifestos.

For real change to occur, action needs to take place.  My intention with “Identity Crisis” was to drop a pebble into the water and hope that some of the ripples turned into waves.  It is in that spirit that I am publishing this follow up essay.

Art Jewellery is Dead.”  That’s how all of this began.  With an absurd statement, that after careful scrutiny, may have been nothing more than a wakeup call from someone who really knows what this movement is supposed to be all about.  In fact, what has transpired is nothing more than a frantic call for the defibrillator, and a huge gasp for air.  Resuscitation alone is not enough however.  Art Jewellery is in need of a transfusion and an injection of new fresh blood.  Art Jewellery isn’t dead; it is hiding from its own “identity.”  For fear that it looks in the mirror only to realize that it still has a tremendous amount of growing up to do.  The Dogmas and narrow minded curating of Art Jewellery over the last decade or more have led us to question whether we even have a future as a field.

Over the years I have developed a network of friends and colleagues in the Americas, Europe, and Asia who will all tell you that Art Jewellery is alive and well.  It might not be what you think it is anymore, but a new “identity” is being revealed.  It will be immediately recognizable and you won’t have to ask yourself “is that Art Jewellery?”  Real Art Jewellery slaps you in the face. It makes you feel something.  You might find yourself proclaiming “I have to have that” before you’ve even had time to think, or ask how much it costs.  Anyone who has ever bought a piece of Art Jewellery knows this feeling.  It is an indescribable feeling.  It is amazement that you can affix to your body and show off to the world as your latest discovery.  Ask yourself when the last time you experienced this was and you will soon realize how scarce real Art Jewellery has become.  That is one of the biggest problems we face with Art Jewellery today.

We have come so far, and yet perhaps we have only scratched the surface.  Why stop here?  Things got difficult, and now we’re all just supposed to pack it in?  No way.  Its time to clean house and get things in order.  But if we want to ensure the survival of this movement, we must ensure that our mission statement is clear, that we have realistic goals, and that we celebrate excellence, not mediocrity.  As long as artists create jewellery, an art jewellery movement will exist.  It is entirely up to us however, to determine how successful and prolific we will be as a field.

In October, 2014 I travelled to China where I was invited to serve as one of the art directors for the Shanghai Jewellery Art Exhibition at Shanghai Design Week. I was also invited to present a lecture at Design Week, and asked to specifically speak about finding a balance between artistic expression and commercial success. That lecture was presented a second time to the jewellery department at Wuhan University of Engineering Sciences several days later. The lectures, as well as this essay, have been developed from the notes that I will share with you over the course of this text.  We will look back at the more successful periods that Art Jewellery has enjoyed and try to determine what has changed.  We will also look at how a redivision of the branches of Art Jewellery may help us more accurately understand and communicate with our target markets.

While I certainly don’t claim to have all the answers, I am prepared to share my thoughts and feelings on these subjects in an effort to keep a healthy dialogue flowing.  My end goal is to ensure the survival and success of the field we all work within, and my hope is that we all benefit from reviving this important movement.  I received an overwhelmingly positive response to my last essay “Identity Crisis,”which was a call to action, in an effort to change things before its too late.  But it doesn’t just end with essays, declarations and manifestos.

For real change to occur, action needs to take place.  My intention with “Identity Crisis” was to drop a pebble into the water and hope that some of the ripples turned into waves.  It is in that spirit that I am publishing this follow up essay.

Forthcoming topics will include:

  •  What is Art Jewellery?
  •  The Art Jewellery “Umbrella”
  •  Extremism
  •  Pole Shift
  •  The dangers of following trends
  •  Shock value
  •  Overpopulation and Overgrowth
  •   »The Golden Standard,” tarnished or simply abandoned?

 

published by Klimt02

18/02/2015

DECOUVERTE : SO YOUNG PARK – smithsonian craft show 2015

Classé dans : Korea (KR),So Young PARK (KR) — bijoucontemporain @ 0:01

SO YOUNG PARK

« My jewelry pieces express the power of life through organic plant forms and sea lives. Most of my jewelry pieces are assembled through the harmonic use of wires, hammered textures, hand engraved patterns, and tiny concave shaped metal pieces creating, elegant, yet unusual visual forms. I work on sterling silver and 18k yellow gold to make jewelry. »

So Young Park - Wind chime in the dream series - Oxidized silver, garnet, citrine 2 1/4" wide x 2 1/4" high on 16" to 18 1/2" multi chain So Young Park - Wind chime in the dream series -Oxidized silver, garnet, citrine 2 1/4″ wide x 2 1/4″ high on 16″ to 18 1/2″ multi chain

So Young Park’s contemporary jewelry forms and theory are inspired from her thesis, Nativity and memories from her childhood. She grew up near the ocean in southern part South Korea. So Young used to play with sea life and plants and collected many different kinds of shells and pebbles. She loved touching and observing the surface texture and pattern of shells and various naturally shaped pebbles during her happy childhood.
As So Young grew, she had several tragic experiences involving the death of her friends. She suffered a long time and her view of life and death dramatically grew different from many other people. Through her thesis works, she found that human life and plant life have similar growth and life characteristics. From an atheistic point view, nature reveals the beauty of the eternal cycles of life, like how rebirth transcends the tragedy of death. In order to bear fruit, plants must progress through many stages of life. During this process different parts of the plants body are required to be sacrificed for the fruit. However, this sacrifice does not signify the end of life, but gives birth to new life. In doing so, this process creates the eternal cycle of life. Her thesis pieces express desire, hope, and the power of life through organic plant forms, that are artistically rendered in a simplistic, geometric, and sophisticated manner.
Her jewelry art forms are assembled through the harmonic use of wires, tiny discs, engraved patterns, and textures forged of gold or silver, creating elegant, yet unusual visual forms. The use of wires, small discs, textures, and other small elements represent the single cells that makeup all life. Each piece contributes to long and painful process to create a beautiful and unusual art forms.

SO YOUNG PARK - Blooming at Night - oxidized silver, 18k yellow gold, black diamonds - Hand fabricated: Soldering, hammering, stone setting- H:2.50 x W:3.50 x D:1.50 InchesSO YOUNG PARK - Blooming at Night – oxidized silver, 18k yellow gold, black diamonds – Hand fabricated: Soldering, hammering, stone setting- H:2.50 x W:3.50 x D:1.50 Inches

SO YOUNG PARK - Red blooming- oxidized silver, carnelian, labradorite -  soldering, hammering, stone setting- H:3.50 x W:2.50 x D:1.50 InchesSO YOUNG PARK - Red blooming- oxidized silver, carnelian, labradorite -  soldering, hammering, stone setting- H:3.50 x W:2.50 x D:1.50 Inches

So Young Park - Shadow at night - oxidized silver, 18k yellow gold, fresh water pearls - Hand fabricated: Soldering, hammering- H:2.00 x W:4.50 x D:1.50 InchesSo Young Park – Shadow at night – oxidized silver, 18k yellow gold, fresh water pearls – Hand fabricated: Soldering, hammering- H:2.00 x W:4.50 x D:1.50 Inches

So Young Park - The chrysanthemum is bathed in moonlight Oxidized silver, 18k yellow gold, tourmaline 2" wide x 2" high So Young Park – The chrysanthemum is bathed in moonlight Oxidized silver, 18k yellow gold, tourmaline 2″ wide x 2″ high

So Young Park -  Sonata in the rain - Oxidized silver, 24k gold leaf, white pearls 3"x3"x2" So Young Park -  Sonata in the rain – Oxidized silver, 24k gold leaf, white pearls 3″x3″x2« 

18/05/2014

EXPO ‘Tales from the North’ – The Scottish Gallery, Edinburgh (UK) – 3-31 Mai 2014

Tales from the North

"Tales from the North" - MAY - Scottish Gallery - Millie Behrens, Nel Linssen, Naomi Mcintosh, Janna Syvänoja, Terhi Tolvanen, Flóra Vági 03 May 2014 - 31 May 2014 - - X

 

Artists:  Millie Behrens Nel Linssen Naomi McintoshJanna Syvänoja Terhi TolvanenFlóra Vági

Tales from the North brings together six contemporary jewellers from Scotland, Norway, Finland, Hungary and Holland. Each of the selected artists uses unconventional materials such as paper, acrylic and pebbles, in an innovative way to create beautiful wearable jewellery. The Scottish Gallery has a longstanding relationship with Nel Linssen, Janna Syvänoja and Naomi McIntosh and is delighted to welcome new artists Terhi Tolvanen, Millie Behrens and Flóra Vági into the fold.

The artists are all highly esteemed within the field of contemporary jewellery and between them their work is held in over 50 Public Collections worldwide.

 Terhi Tolvanen Necklace, Coral Cement 3 - 2012 opal, wood, silver, cement

Terhi Tolvanen – Necklace, Coral Cement 3 – 2012 – opal, wood, silver, cement
 Flóra Vági Dark blue Sea Anemone 2012 old book pages, pigment, acrylic paint W:11cm D:2cm L:16cm Flóra Vági – Dark blue Sea Anemone 2012 old book pages, pigment, acrylic paint W:11cm D:2cm L:16cm
 Janna Syvänoja Necklace 2010 recycled paper, steel wire W:22cm D:10cm L:18cm Janna Syvänoja Necklace 2010 recycled paper, steel wire W:22cm D:10cm L:18cm
Janna Syvänoja Recycled Paper Necklace 2011 recycled paper, steel wire W:17cm H:15cm D:7cm Janna Syvänoja Recycled Paper Necklace 2011 recycled paper, steel wire W:17cm H:15cm D:7cm
 Nel Linssen Blue paper necklace 2013 paper W:18.5cm D:2cm  Nel Linssen Blue paper necklace 2013 paper W:18.5cm D:2cm
 Millie Behrens Golden Pebble brooch silver, gold, pebbles W:11cm H:9cm  Millie Behrens Golden Pebble brooch silver, gold, pebbles W:11cm H:9cm
 Naomi Mcintosh Wearable Space neckpiece 2014 Perspex W:6cm L:70cm Naomi Mcintosh Wearable Space neckpiece 2014 Perspex W:6cm L:70cm

 

 

The Scottish Gallery
16 Dundas Street
Edinburgh
EH3 6HZ
T (+ 44) 0131 558 1200
E mail@scottish-gallery.co.uk

27/08/2013

EXPO ‘Think Twice – Contemporary Latin American Jewellery’ – Centro de las Artes, Nave Generadores, Conarte, Monterrey (Mexico) – 24 Aout-29 Nov. 2013

Classé dans : Amerique Latine,Ateliers d'Art de France,Exposition/Exhibition — bijoucontemporain @ 0:56
Think Twice at Nave Generadores in Conarte, Monterrey
Conferencia inaugural con Valeria Vallarta Siemelink, Alcides Fortes y Martacarmela Sotelo : sábado 24 – 12:00 h.
The Monterrey Center for the Arts, the National Council for Culture and Arts and the Otro Diseño Foundation are honored to invite you to the opening of the exhibition Think Twice: New Latin American Jewellery, to take place next Saturday 24th August at 12:00 hrs at the Nave Generadores of the Parque Fundidora Art Complex.
Lectures by the exhibition’s curator, Valeria Vallarta Siemelink and the Mexican and Dutch artists Martacarmela Sotelo and Alcides Fortes will take place before the opening. Saturday 24th August at 12:00 hrs
 ——————–
Esta exposición logra reunir una gran variedad de joyería hecha en Latinoamérica en los últimos 10 años. Se exhiben piezas de aproximadamente 80 artistas visuales y joyeros, radicados o procedentes de países Latinoamericanos. La exposición incluye una sección en donde se contextualiza y muestra el desarrollo de la disciplina desde principios de los años 50s. Esta fascinante Exhibición cuenta no solo con piezas de joyería y ornato para el cuerpo, sino también con fotografías, piezas de instalación y video.
EXPO Think Twice
 
exponen :  Mirla Fernandes — Kehisha Castello — Helena Biermann — Tota RecicladosUdi LagallinaMartacarmela SoteloKika Alvarenga Silvina RomeroElisa GulminelliCélio Braga — Martha Camargo — Maria Paula Amezcua — Magali Anidjar – Mauricio Lara — Gabriela HorvatJimena RiosJorge CastañónDionea Rocha Watt — Thelma Aviani — Alcides Fortes — Andrés Fonseca — Samantha Fung — Marie PendariesRenata PortoMartha Hryc — Teresa Margolles — Paula Isola — Beate EismannAurelie Dellasanta — Giselle Morales — Fiorenza Coredro — Francisca Kweitel — Alina López — Ana Paula Campos — Mariana Shuck — Stella Bierrenbach — Linda Sánchez — Ana Videla — Alejandra Agusti — Lucia Abdenur — Claudia CucchiChequita Nahar — Ariel Kuipfer — Ximena Briceno — Julieta Odio — Nuria Carulla — Henna Lee — Alejandra Hernández Montoya — Laura de Alba – Luis AcostaMariana Acosta — Valentina Rosenthal — Laura Alvarado — Carolina Martínez Linares — Leda Daverio — Alejandra Solar Dani SoterBenjamin Lignel –  Raquel Paiewonsky — Lorena LazardMaria Constanza Ochoa — Ursula Guttmann –  Aline Berdichevsky – Carolina Gimeno Walka Studio — Zinna Rudman — Nilton Cunha — Alex Bourttiea — Eduardo Graue — Hugo Celi — Isel Mendoza — Alex Burke — Miguel Luciano.
Luis Acosta - serie de broches de hilo de papel
Luis Acosta – serie de broches de hilo de papel

Think_Twice/ Cucchi_Claudia-Orange.jpgClaudia Cucchi (Brazil) – brooch ‘Orange’, 2002 – Orange skin, Perspex, silver

Think_Twice/ Ochoa_Maria_Constanza-Soft_Black_and_White.jpgMaria Constanza Ochoa (Colombia) – Necklace ‘Soft Black and White’, 2008 – Latex balloons, flour, cotton

Mirla Fernandes - "Herança" necklace - latex, paint, porcelain
Mirla Fernandes – « Herança » necklace – latex, paint, porcelain
  Reny Golcman (Brazil) Jaw Necklace, 1973 Necklace Silver, barracuda bones
Reny Golcman, Brazil - Jaw Necklace, 1973 Necklace Silver, barracuda bones
Martacarmela Sotelo - Roots -
Martacarmela Sotelo – « Roots » necklace – Nopal fiber, stainless steel wire coated with nylon
AURÉLIE DELLASANTA Born 1980, Switzerland/Mexico Suicide Brooch, 2007 Painted metal, gilded metal, paper  (THINK TWICE)Aurélie DELLASANTA – Switzerland/Mexico – Suicide Brooch, 2007 Painted metal, gilded metal, paper 
Ursula Guttmann Born 1968, Austria Tanto Pelo me Abrió el Corazón, 2010 Silicon, gold (THINK TWICE)
Ursula Guttmann –   « Tanto Pelo me Abrió el Corazón », 2010 Silicon, gold
Jorge Manilla ( Think Twice)
Jorge Manilla

Think Twice: New Latin American Jewellery at the MAD NYC - - Ximena Briceno - Beach

Ximena Briceno – ‘Pebbles on the Shore of Eternity’ Brooch – Titanium

Alcides Fortes Galería Nudo (Cape Verde - Mexico)    'Olvidos de la Revolución' Necklace - Silver, copper, enamel   (THINK TWICE exhibition)
Alcides Fortes  (Cape Verde – Mexico)    ‘Olvidos de la Revolución’ Necklace – Silver, copper, enamel 
EXPO Think Twice - Mariana Acosta
Mariana Acosta
 
 
Centro de las Artes
Nave Generadores.
Parque Fundidora Art Complex
Av. Fundidora y Adolfo Prieto S/N, Col. Obrera, Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico
 T. +52 (81) 8479-0010 al 14
Martes a domingo | 11:00 a 21:00 h.
Entrada libre.

20/11/2012

MADE12 – Brighton (UK) – 22-25 Nov. 2012

MADE12

Brighton’s Design and Craft Fair

MADE12 - Brighton (UK) - 22-25 Nov. 2012 dans Bekki CHURCHER (UK) news16-3-copyMADE12 exhibitors : Karen Fox / Kirsty Fraser

Look out for MADE12 in Brighton from November 22-25 2012. The 120 makers include a fair sprinkling of ARTS THREAD members, such as Karen Fox, Rhona McCallum, Ros Millar, Suet Yi Yip and Kirsty Fraser.

link to MADE12

 dans Grande-Bretagne (UK)
Bekki Churcher Partially oxidised silver bangle
 dans John MOORE (UK)Bekki Churcher Geometric silver ring with a tumbled peridot
 dans Karen FOX (UK)Karen Dell’Armi  Etched Silver Long Necklace
 dans Kirsty FRASER (UK)Karen Fox – Ruffle Neckpiece. Stainless steel mesh-cloth, silk ribbon, 14ct gold filled chain
 dans Polly HORWICH (UK)
Kirsty Fraser, Rooftop Necklace, silver with frosted acrylic and cord
 dans Rhona McCALLUM (UK)Polly Horwich Five Red Rings. steel, plastic coating various

 

 dans Ros MILLAR (UK)
Rhona McCallum,   Marram I, Neckpiece (2011) Brass, steel
 dans Salon

Rhona McCallum,  Weathered Line Bangle (2012) Oxidised white metal, brass, epoxy putty, slate

 

Black and Rose Collection Rings
Ros Millar,   Black and Rose Collection Rings
 dans Tanja UFER (DE)
John Moore – Vane bracelet. Reversible. Anodised aluminium, stell and silicone
Tanja Ufer – Microchrystaline quartz, fire opal, 22ct gold, silver, fine gold kumboo
Pebbles Necklace
Liz Willis - Pebbles Necklace – Silver, hand stitched silk thread & glass beads. Image by Keith Leighton

 

 

 

the Corn Exchange,
Church Street,
Brighton BN1 1UG
in the heart of Brighton just around the corner from the Royal Pavilion
Brighton (UK)

06/09/2012

EXPO ‘NEW TALENT’ – Lesley Craze Gallery, London (UK) – 4 Sept.-13 Oct. 2012

NEW TALENT

Spotlight runs from  4th September – 13th October 2012

Lesley Craze Gallery - New TalentEight new jewellery graduates from across the UK have been selected to showcase a small selection of their work at Lesley Craze Gallery, London.
This spotlight will bring together exceptional examples of innovative jewellery design and craftsmanship from emerging makers. The work ranges from delicate enamel earrings to large textile neckpieces, all of which offer fresh ideas on design, materials and technique.
Lesley Craze Gallery’s New Talent spotlight promises to be full of exciting, unusual and thoughtfully crafted pieces that will demonstrate the breath of young talent emerging from Britain today. New work from new makers who will undoubtedly be ones to watch in the future.

Featuring:  Elizabeth ArmourCarrie DickensFrancesca Flynn — Nabla Pall — Mariko SumiokaFern JellymanHeather Woof — Nicola Wilde

 Fern Jellyman necklaceFern Jellyman necklace « knot »

Heather Woof    Windswept Collection 2012 Heather Woof     Windswept Collection 2012 - hand cut titanium and mild steel. Elizabeth Armour

Francesca Flynn - Rutile Shards Brooch     Structure created using balsa wood and adhesive, coated in acrylic paint with quartz point elements.Francesca Flynn – Rutile Shards Brooch – Structure created using balsa wood and adhesive, coated in acrylic paint with quartz point elements. Carrie DickensCarrie Dickens « precious pebbles » series 2012 – sterling silver cast over slip-cast bone china, tussah silk

Mariko Sumioka "rokusyo no yane" earringsMariko Sumioka  « rokusyo no yane » earrings

 

Lesley Craze Gallery
3 – 35a Clerkenwell Green
EC1R 0DU – London
United Kingdom
Telephone: 020 7608 0393
Fax: 020 7251 5655

VIDEOS :

 Elizabeth Armour – Jewellery Designer

Student Profile: Francesca Flynn – Silversmithing and Jewellery from The Glasgow School of Art

 

14/06/2012

Decouverte – CHRISTEL VAN DER LAAN

Classé dans : Christel van der LAAN (NL),COUP DE COEUR,Hollande (NL) — bijoucontemporain @ 0:05

CHRISTEL VAN DER LAAN

« Usually materials form the starting point for a work, or often I have a title in mind and the piece develops from there. Much time is spent arranging and drawing until I find harmony and tension between compositional elements »

Chistel van der Laan - 'Priceless Bangle', 2004. Gold plated sterling silver, Dyed nylon swing tags.Christel Van der Laan – ‘Priceless Bangle’, 2004. Gold plated sterling silver, Dyed nylon swing tags.

« Collecting, arranging and making things have been a part of my life since I can remember.
It is a passion I have shared with my parents Els and Piet, grandparents, Bep, Wim and Miep, aunts Marion, Olga, Atie, Mieke and Liesbeth, uncles Adri,Theo and Tom who between them have/had careers or an interest in everything from antiques, tribal art, textiles, photography, contemporary art, furniture and design to plant and animal life.
Emigration to South Africa as a child, back to the Netherlands and then Australia, presented dazzling natural environments and cultures for exploration. Often my extended family would visit and trips into the « veld » and later, « bush » would yield unexpected booties and a wealth of impressions, while second-hand shops and roadside vendors were a source of many extraordinary finds. My mother was my principal partner in these adventures and when she died in 1994, my focus shifted.
In the last few years these precious items, or later finds with associations to particular times and places, have begun to play a more meaningful part in my jewellery.  There is humour and sadness in some of these pieces, even guilt, while others are simply a celebration of the beauty of individual elements, transformed when placed next to others.
Usually materials form the starting point for a work, or often I have a title in mind and the piece develops from there. Much time is spent arranging and drawing until I find harmony and tension between compositional elements.
A material I am currently exploring is ceramic honeycomb block, known more for its heat distribution qualities during soldering than as a focal point in a piece of jewellery. I am mesmerised by its beauty and the possibilities it presents aesthetically and conceptually.
Challenging notions of preciousness in conventional jewellery in a way that is gently humorous and sometimes ironic remains an enduring theme in my work. I love word plays and how they create new layers of meaning when used in the title of a piece.
Most importantly, I want to make surprising, beautiful objects that move people, to seek and to think and to smile. What could be more precious? »

de la transparence « industrielle » des débuts aux matités organiques actuelles, choix en blanc :

Christel van der Laan - Priceless Bangle, 2004. Gold plated sterling silver, polypropylene swing tagsChristel Van der Laan – Priceless Bangle. Gold plated sterling silver, polypropylene swing tags – 2004

Christel van der Laan - Priceless Bangle, 2004 (DETAIL)Christel Van der Laan – Priceless Bangle, 2004 (DETAIL)

Christel van der Laan -  Ring: Priceless Gem 2003Christel Van der Laan -  Ring: Priceless Gem 2003

Christel van der Laan - Cut Price Ring, 2006. Gold plated sterling silver, polypropylene swing tag ends.Christel Van der Laan – Cut Price Ring, 2006. Gold plated sterling silver, polypropylene swing tag ends.

Christel van der Laan - brooch:  Karoo 2008. Ostrich shell, ostrich beads, painted sterling silver, 18ct goldChristel Van der Laan – brooch:  Karoo . Ostrich shell, ostrich beads, painted sterling silver, 18ct gold – 2008

Holier Than Thou brooch, 2009

Christel Van der Laan – Holier Than Thou brooch, 2009

Christel van der Laan - Butterfly Brooch 2009. Painted sterling silver, 18ct gold, vintage camphor glass, mother of pearl button, mother of pearl shell, quartz, glass bead, freshwater pearlChristel Van der Laan – Butterfly Brooch 2009. Painted sterling silver, 18ct gold, vintage camphor glass, mother of pearl button, mother of pearl shell, quartz, glass bead, freshwater pearl

Christel van der Laan - Lily Pad Brooch 2009. 18ct gold, vintage camphor glass, painted copperChristel Van der Laan – Lily Pad Brooch 2009. 18ct gold, vintage camphor glass, painted copper

Christel van der Laan - brooch: Mother Daughter 2008. Painted sterling silver, 18ct gold, mother of pearl shell, freshwater pearlsChristel Van der Laan – brooch: Mother Daughter 2008. Painted sterling silver, 18ct gold, mother of pearl shell, freshwater pearls

Christel van der Laan - brooch: Here and There  2008. Painted sterling silver, ostrich shell, fish vertebra, pebble.Christel Van der Laan – brooch: Here and There  2008. Painted sterling silver, ostrich shell, fish vertebra, pebble.

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