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15/09/2017

EXCHANGE-BIJOU 2 – Reka Lőrincz – « Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious » at Putti Art Gallery, sept. 2017

Reka Lőrincz

5 new pieces on show at Putti Art Gallery  during September 2017 (08-27 Sep 2017) :  Supercalifragilisticexpialidocious. Jewellery is not only jewellery

(next exhibition : 2018: Fair  07 Mar 2018 – 13 Mar 2018  Schmuck 2018.)

« On the border of kitsch and consume Réka Lörincz from Budapest and Gisbert Stach from Munich show a colourful kaleidoscope of works defining field of jewellery in a new creative way »
«  There are many misunderstandings in the common meaning of jewellery and in the thinking of what jewellery should be.
On the border of kitsch and consume Réka Lörincz from Budapestand Gisbert Stach from Munich show a colourful kaleidoscope of jewellery, objects, installations and films where they try to define and enlighten the field of jewellery in a new humoristic, critical and philosophical way.
Both are doing as well collaborations in making jewellery pieces.

 
Réka Lörincz’s jewellery is playing with the colourful world of plastics and toys that she is deforming by absurd and surrealistic elements into amazing jewellery pieces. Their objects are pretending to have a function. But by combining abstract materials the visitor is surprised by the humour and colourfulness of the installation. Reka Lorincz has studied in Hungarian University of Craft and Design, has shown her works in various group and personal exhibitions around the world. » (Klimt02)

 

COCO ! sort de ce corps !!!!

 Réka Lörincz Brooch: Don't take care!, 2017 Pearl, silk, gold-plated brass, wood, acrylic paintRéka Lörincz Brooch: Don’t take care!, 2017 Pearl, silk, gold-plated brass, wood, acrylic paint

Réka Lörincz Necklace: Don't take care!, 2017 Pearl, silk, gold-plated brass, wood, acrylic paintRéka Lörincz Necklace: Don’t take care!, 2017 Pearl, silk, gold-plated brass, wood, acrylic paint Réka Lörincz Brooch: Monday to Sunday, 2017 Pearl, champagne quartz, mystic topaz, sapphire, ruby,  rhodium - plated brass, plastic, stainless steel, mountain crystal, citrineRéka Lörincz Brooch: Monday to Sunday, 2017 Pearl, champagne quartz, mystic topaz, sapphire, ruby,  rhodium – plated brass, plastic, stainless steel, mountain crystal, citrine

Exhibition display.  -   Réka Lörincz Brooch: Monday to Sunday, 2017 Pearl, champagne quartz, mystic topaz, sapphire, ruby,  rhodium - plated brass, plastic, stainless steel, mountain crystal, citrineExhibition display.  -   Réka Lörincz Brooch: « Monday to Sunday »

Réka Lörincz Object: Pearl grinder, 2015 Pearl, alloy, wood, metal foilRéka Lörincz Object: Pearl grinder, 2015 Pearl, alloy, wood, metal foil

Réka Lörincz Object: Must Have, 2017 Pearl, shovel, epoxy, textile  Réka Lörincz Object: Must Have, 2017 Pearl, shovel, epoxy, textile 

Réka Lörincz Necklace: Pearl truck, 2015 Pearl, goldplated brass, alloy, plastic, epoxyRéka Lörincz Necklace: Pearl truck, 2015 Pearl, goldplated brass, alloy, plastic, epoxy

Réka Lörincz Brooch: Perfect woman, 2015 Gold plated cooper, pearl, plastic 7.5 x 10 x 1.5 cmRéka Lörincz Brooch: Perfect woman, 2015 Gold plated cooper, pearl, plastic 7.5 x 10 x 1.5 cm

 Réka Lörincz Brooch: Pearl can, 2015 Gold plated cooper, pearl, stainless steel ø 6 cmRéka Lörincz Brooch: Pearl can, 2015 Gold plated cooper, pearl, stainless steel ø 6 cm

 Reka lorincz - Hommage à Coco Channel -  necklace - pearl, duct tape 2015:Reka Lorincz - Hommage à Coco Channel -  necklace – pearl, duct tape 2015

 

 

 

Education:
2012
Workshop with Gemma Draper – Antwerpem
2011 Symposium in Bratislava – Atelier EM
2010 Semmelweis University – Department of applied Psychology
2007 Workshop with Ted Noten – BIAD – Birmingham
2004 Diploma
2002 Erasmus scolarship to Spain, Barcelona
2000 Hungarian University of Craft and Design – Visual educator teacher department
1999- 2004 Hungarian University of Craft and Design – Metal design department
1997-1999 Budai Art technical college – goldsmith department

 

 

 

Putti Art Gallery
16 Mārstaļu iela
1050 -  Rïga
LATVIA

23/11/2016

EXCHANGE-BIJOU 2 – Reka Lőrincz – you are what you eat

Classé dans : COUP DE COEUR,EXCHANGE-BIJOU,Hongrie (HU),Reka LORINCZ (HU) — bijoucontemporain @ 23:47

Reka Lőrincz

Un humour jubilatoire, grinçant, décapant, à tout va, qui dénonce, montre du doigt, ce qu’on mange, ce qu’on avale -mentalement comme physiquement- , ce qu’on croit ou qu’on veut nous faire croire ……

« Jewellery design means the interpretation of today’s world to me. A sort of communication between the outside world and that of my own. Making the invisible visible. Through my jewels I am contemplating the tangled variety of the universe. Heaps of emotions and thoughts pass through my mind through the impulses of the environment which I examine and turn them into objects. I am intrigued by the street. What exactly means what I see. Through my objects I mainly tried to reflect the difference between that of the shown and the real world which can sometimes look appealing, fake or even dangerous. »

Avec tous les médicaments que j’avale (merci mon diabète !!! :-( …) je commencerai par cette broche qui m’enchante !!! entre « boulimie du médoc » et « boulimie du bijou » …… ;-)

Reka Lorincz, Pearl pills, brooch - silver, pearl, stainless steel, plastic 2015: Reka Lorincz, Pearl pills, brooch – silver, pearl, stainless steel, plastic 2015

Reka Lorincz, diamond pills, brooch - gold plated copper, aluminium, swarovski  2013Reka Lorincz, diamond pills, brooch – gold plated copper, aluminium, swarovski   2013

Réka Lörincz. Brooch: Pearl can, 2015. Gold plated cooper, pearl, stainless steel. ø 6 cm: Réka Lörincz. Brooch: Pearl can, 2015. Gold plated cooper, pearl, stainless steel. ø 6 cm

 

« Budapest-based Reka Lörincz is an award-winning artist who typically expresses social criticism – such as concerns with commercialisation, mass production and popular culture –through 3D objects.
Her ‘Too Much is Not Enough” collection  is the perfect example.
Populated with symbols of 1950s diner culture, which are then translated into kitsch and colourful crystal gem-studded jewellery, it’s designed to amuse as much as they provoke. » (Adorn)
Reka Lorincz -  "Too Much is Not Enough" (bone) brooch -  gold plated copper, plastic, gold foil, swarovski crystalReka Lorincz -  « Too Much is Not Enough » (bone) brooch -2013 – gold plated copper, plastic, gold foil, swarovski crystal

  Reka-Lörincz  "Too Much is Not Enough" hamburger brooch 2013 - gold plated copper, plastic, gold foil, swarovski crystalReka Lörincz comments on consumerism -  You are what you eat -  « Too Much is Not Enough » hamburger brooch 2013 – gold plated copper, plastic, gold foil, swarovski crystal
Réka Lőrincz  2013 - Ice cream II brooch - plastic, gold plated copper, swarovski: Réka Lőrincz  2013 – Ice cream II brooch – plastic, gold plated copper, swarovski
Reka Lorincz, brooch, You are what you eat - gold plated brass, stainless steel, pearls: Reka Lorincz, brooch, You are what you eat – gold plated brass, stainless steel, pearls
et ce bijou-ci, par pur plaisir jubilatoire !
Reka lorincz - Hommage à Coco Channel -  necklace - pearl, duct tape 2015: Reka Lorincz - Hommage à Coco Channel -  necklace – pearl, duct tape 2015
 
Studies
2012                 Workshop with Gemma Drapper, Antwerpen
2011                 Symposium – Atelier Em, Bratislava
2010-2012      Semmelweis University – Department of Applied Psychology, Budapest
2007                Workshop with Ted Noten – BIAD, Birmingham
2002                Erasmus scholarship – ELISAVA, Barcelona
2000-2005     Hungarian University of Craft & Design – Department of Visual Educator Teacher, Budapest
1999-2004     Hungarian University of Craft and Design – Department of Metal Design, Budapest
1997-1999       Art School of Buda – Department of Goldsmith, Budapest

 

06/11/2016

EXPO ‘Triple Parade Exhibitions’ – SHENGXI Art Museum, Tianjin / Gauguin Gallery, Beijing (China) – 10 Nov. 2016-16 Janv. 2017

«Triple Parade Exhibitions» 

SHENGXI Art Museum at Tianjin (China), & then Gauguin Gallery at Beijing

Triple Parade in Tianjin: 10th.NOV – 10th.DEC. 2016
Location: Shengxi Museum of Fine Arts, Tianjin

Triple Parade in Beijing: 17th.DEC.2016 – 16th.JAN.2017
Location: Gauguin Gallery Beijing, Wangjing SOHO.

Triple Parade exhibitions in Tianjin & Beijing Exhibition  /  10 Nov 2016  -  17 Jan 2017 - Tianjin Shengxi Museum of Fine Arts & Gauguin Gallery Beijing

The main exhibition TRIPLE PARADE 2016 -  Dialogue Across You and Me to Them: Creator, Wearer, Viewer  – Central Traveling Exhibition Represented 110 jewellery designers & artists from 14 countries.

The Triple Parade 2016 international annual exhibition is a cultural exchange which is expanded between China and the rest of the world on a multitude of level, devoted to the hardcore awakening in jewellery design, with a very open and contemporary-oriented approach by focusing on the concept of dialoguing.

The pervious themes were: Triple Parade 2015 – Dialogue across Three Countries, Triple Parade 2014 – Dialogue across Three Generations. This year, the term Dialogue across You and Me to Them: Creator, Wearer, Viewer in our theme is vitally important marks the notion of social interaction. We believe that the significance and multiple capacities of the dialogue mark have not been truly recognized. Each of the three roles in a dialogue, which are briefly introduced in the plate sections devoted to them, addresses one perspective on how  » Dialogue » plays a progressive position in the contemporary jewellery design of our period. Jewellery examines how we define self, integration and segregation, the means used for communication – and how these issues are reflected in creative work.

the artists and designers will be part of this year’s TRIPLE PARADE Central Exhibitions are:
Karin JohanssonPaul DerrezLin Cheung — Dinie Besems — Kim Buck Lauren KalmanEzra Satok-WolmanKatja Prins Joo Hyung ParkSofie BoonsChiara Scarpitti Trinidad ContrerasAisegul Telli — Ana Filipa Braganca — Gular MustafaDukno Yoon Hester Popma-Van De Kolk — Joson Thomson – Juan Harnie Marie-Louise Kristensen –  Marion DelarueMinna KarhuRuta Naujalyte Sangji YunSara Gackowska — Lee Yojae — Lee Myungjoo — Hong Kyunghee — Zixuan Feng — Zheng Yu — Haiming Ren — Dingchen He — Zhicheng  Zhou — Wei Zhou — Jingyao Sun — Ye Zhang — Yiping Zeng — Danyi Zhu — Yuxuan Zhu — Anqi Li — Heng Li — Wenqian Li — Muzi Li — Dongdong Zhuang — Jie Sun — Jing Li — Guangyao Yang — Xiao Liang — Yanli Duan — Hangchen Duan — Jinwei Chi — Zhaokun Wang — Jun Hu — Bai Xie — Yi Zhao — Xinan Yu — Hui Guo — Xiaodai Huang — Zhaodan Zhang — Kui Shu — Shijian Zhao — Peter Rust — Kirsi Manninen — Anne Bader — Shaofei Zhang & Qian Wang — Ying Jiang — Lin Ju — Yin Chang — Wenqi Xu — Hongyu Xu — Yan Li — Wenqian Li — Feiyu Lin — Liyin Wang — Weiming Lu — Ma Lu — Quanxia Chen.

Ra Gallery Selection:   Sam-Tho Duong — Monique Vierling — Julian Steimer — Noon Passama — Thanh Truc Nguyen — Floor Mommersteeg — Bogki Min — Peter Hoogeboom — Mirjam Hiller — Karin Herwegh — Hartog & Henneman — Hilde Foks — Reka Fekete — Sarah Enoch — Sylvia Blickman — Paul Derrez.

K.A.U. COLLECTION Selection: Ted NOTEN — Lucy SARNEEL — Birgit LAKEN –Peter HOOGEBOOM — Willem HONING — Gemma DRAPER — Warwick FREEMAN — Bettina SPECKNER — Marc MONZO — Georg DOBLER.

 at TRIPLE PARADE

at TRIPLE PARADE

 » TRIPLE PARADE 2016 will open its door at 10th NOV in Tianjin in China, it embraced the aspirations in a great ambition, setting up an intensive program consisting of exhibitions, publication, workshops, forum, lecture, which included dialogues with international collaboration partners from Netherlands, United States, United Kingdom, China, Denmark, Spain. The exhibition represented an enormous challenge to everyone involved in purely quantitative terms: with over 260 works by more than a hundred designers and artists from 14 countries. 11 experts from 8 countries have been exclusively invited to be in Tianjin as speaker on the Design Forum. The publication consists of 7 groups of interviews, including 14 experts on board, giving perspectives from education, collecting, creating, curating, wearing, and dealing on contemporary jewellery design. I am confident that it will open up new perspectives on the giant, and I would like to invite all the visitors to discover the greatly relevant designs from a field so full of surprises, with such a future ahead of it. » Jie Sun (founder of Triple Parade)

 at TRIPLE PARADE


 

* Shenxi Art Museum
12 Nancheng street
Nankai District -  Tianjin
CHINA

 

* Gauguin Gallery
Wang Jing S O H O Zhong Xin T 2
chaoyang Qu -  Beijing
CHINA

 TRIPLE PARADE

 

EXPO 'Triple Parade Exhibitions' - SHENGXI Art Museum, Tianjin / Gauguin Gallery, Beijing (China) - 10 Nov. 2016-16 Janv. 2017 dans Aisegul TELLI (TR) 14976538_10211135464690832_2617370637365402107_oEnregistrer

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28/02/2016

During SCHMUCK 2016 : EXPO ‘BRACELETS FOR PAUL & WILLEM’ – 3stations, Munich (DE) – 26-28 fevr. 2016

BRACELETS FOR PAUL & WILLEM (Gallery Ra)

Opening:  Thursday 25th February  3pm-7 pm

3Stations - a5 - BRACELETS FOR PAUL & WILLEM (Gallery Ra)<Paul Derrez and Willem Hoogstede (Gallery RA Amsterdam) wearing a braclet designed by Arne Van De Mierop>

Students of the Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp

 

‘FOR EACH A BRACELET’

As a sequel to ‘Ring for the Lords’ (Walter Van Beirendonck and Marnick Smessaert), ‘Jewels for the Ladies’ (Marjan Unger and Anita Evenepoel), ‘Brooches para las Chicas’ (Chequita Nahar and Valeria Vallarta Siemelink), ‘Mary Ted Noten’  (Ted Noten and Clemence-Marie van Lieshout), this year ‘For Each a Bracelet’ was the 5th edition of an ongoing jewellery project by the Royal Academy of Fine Arts Antwerp. Students of the Bachelor course at the Jewellery Design & Silversmithing department were asked to design bracelets for Paul Derrez and Willem Hoogstede. (Gallery RA Amsterdam)

The consideration to give this assignment was mainly motivated by the minimal offer of contemporary styled bracelets. As an additional difficulty Paul & Willem operated as a condition that both bracelets had to differ from each other but still had to look like a ‘couple’.
After an exciting and instructive glimpse into their private collection our students had to get started with their different approaches as result.

Participants:  Jade Houben — Vie Stessens — Theresa Storbacka — Arne Van De Mierop — Emilie Putteman — Sophia De Groot — Anneleen De Vree — Caroline Du Chastel — Jil Jander — Linda Janssen — Camille Pennequin — Viktoria von Mallotki — Xinyuan Hu –Ying Chen — Dabin Lee — Caroline Geerardyn — Yijun Liu — Orsolya Losonczy — Josefine Mass — Vincent Verstrepen — Shahrzad Motallebi — Annika Wirken

 <Paul Derrez and Willem Hoogstede (Gallery RA Amsterdam) wearing a braclet designed by Theressa Storbackan><Paul Derrez and Willem Hoogstede (Gallery RA Amsterdam) wearing a braclet designed by Theressa Storbackan>

<Paul Derrez and Willem Hoogstede (Gallery RA Amsterdam) wearing a braclet designed by Jil Jander><Paul Derrez and Willem Hoogstede (Gallery RA Amsterdam) wearing a braclet designed by Jil Jander>

<Paul Derrez and Willem Hoogstede (Gallery RA Amsterdam) wearing a braclet designed by Vie Stessens><Paul Derrez and Willem Hoogstede (Gallery RA Amsterdam) wearing a braclet designed by Vie Stessens>

 

3stations

Welsertrasse 23

Studio Loft c/o Afra Dopfer
81373 München
Contact Information: Marc Ribbens +32 476.65.98.26
jewelleryantwerpacademy@outlook.com
Fr – Sat 10 am – 6 pm,
Su  10 am – 2 pm

04/02/2016

Selected 4 SCHMUCK 2016 : Moniek Schrijer

Classé dans : COUP DE COEUR,DECOUVERTE,Moniek SCHRIJER (NZ),SCHMUCK / MJW (DE) — bijoucontemporain @ 0:04

Moniek Schrijer  … et rester cloué ! d’abord par ses « nails pendants », puis par la variété et surtout, la force, la présence brute de ses bijoux

Congrats to all the artists who made the SCHMUCK 2016 list, on show at the Handwerksmesse  during #munichjewelleryweek  24/02–1/03/2016

Moniek Schrijer - pendant / nail, silver, flouride / 2012: Moniek Schrijer – pendant / nail, silver, flouride / 2012

Moniek Schrijer‘s practice has been said to push jewellery into an intoxicating new realm, combining elements of sculpture and printmaking, Moniek create’s bold and unique work with a strong focus on experimentation and process, her primary interests being the transformative potential of materials,,,,,,giving the viewer the power of the alchemist. Moniek has exhibited her jewellery widely, and has work in public and private collections.

Education/Artist Training
2013: Graduate Diploma of Applied Art, Jewellery and Printmaking, Whitireia NZ
2011-12: Bachelor of Applied Art, Contemporary Jewellery, Whitireia NZ Faculty of Arts
2008-14: The Heavy Metal Foundry, Wellington, New Zealand
2007: Manufacturing Jewellery Certificate, The Open Polytechnic, New Zealand
2004: Diploma in Jewellery Design – Whitireia NZ Faculty of Arts

Awards/Residences
2015: Francoise van den Bosch, Studio Rian de Jong Artist in Residence
2013: Highly Commended Award, ECC NZ Craft & Design Awards
2013: Whitireia New Zealand, Toi Poneke Artist in Residence
2013: Fingers Gallery, Graduate Award
2013: Masterworks Gallery, Jewellery Box Showcase Award
2012: Atelier Ted Noten’s Selected Featured Artist for JEMposium

2015: The Ring Show, The National, Christchurch, NZ
2015: The Chain, Masterworks Gallery, Auckland, NZ
2015: Wunderruma, Auckland Art Gallery, New Zealand
2015: Pearl, Masterworks Gallery, Auckland, New Zealand
2015: The Bold and the Beautiful, The Dowse Art Museum, Lower Hutt, New Zealand
2014: Talente, Munich, Germany
2013: Marzee Graduation Show, Galerie Marzee, Nijmegen, The Netherlands

*

Moniek Schrijer: Moniek Schrijer - Untitled, 2011-12, pendants, iron nails, sterling silver, natural minerals, various sizes, photo: Moniek Schrijer – (Whitireia 2012 BA degree)

Moniek Schrijer: Moniek Schrijer -pendants 2012 – pendants, iron nails, sterling silver, natural minerals, various sizes

Moniek Schrijer - Mal di Luna (Moon Sickness), 2012, neckpiece, clay, enamel, shellac, glass, electrical cord, 15 x 12 x 1 inches, photo: Moniek Schrijer - Whitireia 2012 BA degree: Moniek Schrijer - Mal di Luna (Moon Sickness), 2012, neckpiece, clay, enamel, shellac, glass, electrical cord, 15 x 12 x 1 inches, photo: Moniek Schrijer – (Whitireia 2012 BA degree)

Moniek Schrijer - diskette / pendant / aluminium, brass, enamel / 2013: Moniek Schrijer – diskette / pendant / aluminium, brass, enamel / 2013

Moniek Schrijer - wakame radiation / necklace / Japanese seed beads, chinese nephrite, pounamu, dyed turquoise, labradoite, glass bottle / 2013: Moniek Schrijer - wakame radiation / necklace / Japanese seed beads, chinese nephrite, pounamu, dyed turquoise, labradoite, glass bottle / 2013 Moniek Schrijer - neckpiece / Concrete, steel, clay, clamshell, glass, silver plaited forks, paint / 2012: Moniek Schrijer – neckpiece / Concrete, steel, clay, clamshell, glass, silver plaited forks, paint / 2012 (Whitireia 2012 BA degree )

Moniek Schrijer - bracelet / Rimu, enamel, ink, brass screws, topaz, synthetic sapphire, / 2012: Moniek Schrijer – bracelet / Rimu, enamel, ink, brass screws, topaz, synthetic sapphire, / 2012

Moniek Schrijer - brooch / rimu, glass, pearl, pyrite, copper, paint / 2012: Moniek Schrijer – brooch / rimu, glass, pearl, pyrite, copper, paint / 2012

23/09/2015

EXPO during JOYA Barcelona OFF 2015 : ‘To Recover’ – Klimt02 Gallery, Barcelona (ES) – 7 Oct.-7 Nov. 2015

exhibition being part of « OFF JOYA » 2015

http://www.joyabarcelona.com/images/Prensa/logo_joya.jpg

To RecoverKlimt02 Gallery

Opening : 7 October from 19 h.

To Recover Exhibition  / 07Oct - 7Nov2015 Klimt02 Gallery  (Ted Noten Superbitch Bag, 2000 / Superbitch Bag Revisited, 2015)

Artist list   Simon CottrellKarl FritschGésine HackenbergKarin JohanssonJiro KamataSari LiimattaStefano MarchettiTed NotenNoon Passama –  Annelies PlanteydtTore SvenssonLisa WalkerManon van Kouswijk

Manon van Kouswijk Pearl Grey necklace, 2008 / Pearl Grey Revisited necklace, 2015 Glass elements (saucer, hand formed cup handle with attached glass beads), diverse glass and plastic beads, polyester thread, glue.  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Manon van Kouswijk Pearl Grey necklace, 2008 / Pearl Grey Revisited necklace, 2015 Glass elements (saucer, hand formed cup handle with attached glass beads), diverse glass and plastic beads, polyester thread, glue.  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

The original « Pearl Grey » of 2009 was an assemblage work consisting of found and made elements of porcelain, glass, wood, plastic and pearl. It referenced a traditional cup and saucer of which the cup had been magically replaced by a bead necklace. For this new work I have translated that idea to the typology of a glass ‘saucer and cup’. It is again a combination of found and made elements but this time the work is completely transparent; almost like an x-ray of it’s predecessor

Gésine Hackenberg Still Life, 2009 / Pink Balancing Glass brooch, 2015 Glass by Theresienthal, silver  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Gésine Hackenberg Still Life, 2009 / Pink Balancing Glass brooch, 2015 Glass by Theresienthal, silver  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

The ‘Still Life’ Brooches that I have made between 2009 and 2012 can be seen as a contemporary interpretation of 17th and 18th century Dutch Still Life paintings. This subject was preferable used to portray items of daily life that were emotionally and economically significant for people of that time.  Within my ‘Still Lifes’, I sliced existing glasswork and rearranged them into new compositions. They represented a perfect translation of the three dimensional to the two dimensional, the realistic vista of the glasses to the medium of jewellery. The body is taking on the role of the canvas as it were…  Within the new work I explored another way of looking at tableware than in a static composition: I wanted to express a certain precarious dynamic that is inherent to drinking glasses during a sociable meal. I tried to catch this moment of a glass tumbling, undecided yet if it is going to fall or stay upright.

 Sari Liimatta But I love Him object, 2005 / But they don´t love him pendant, 2015 Glass beads, metal link, thread (polyamide), a plastic toy  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Sari Liimatta But I love Him object, 2005 / But they don´t love him pendant, 2015 Glass beads, metal link, thread (polyamide), a plastic toy  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

Just as men are not just men, and women just women, meat is never just meat. It has it´s past and origin, a story which is so often simply forgotten. Living creatures which are very much alive until they are nothing more than materials, for those who still choose to use them. Even the life before their death is so often more than problematic, as we all know. As we all know.

 Annelies Planteijdt Beautiful City - Pink Stairs necklace, 2001 / Beautiful City-Pink Stairs Black Crystal necklace, 2015 Gold, Tantalum, pigment  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Annelies Planteijdt Beautiful City – Pink Stairs necklace, 2001 / Beautiful City-Pink Stairs Black Crystal necklace, 2015 Gold, Tantalum, pigment  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015 

 I started to re-consider a piece from 2001, that never has been sold, although I liked it very much, ‘Beautiful City – Pink Stairs’.  This piece is really symmetrical, so I decided to look for a way to separate it in two parts and finish both parts in a different way, in order to get two different pieces. I have re-collected parts of other (unsold) pieces from about the same time (1999 and 2000) and have been re-approaching and re-thinking them: I made ‘Crystals’ with them, like I did in my most recent work. So I have been mixing time and thinking. And size: the sizes I used earlier were different from the sizes I used in the later ‘Beautiful City’ series, they wouldn’t have fit. But because the ‘Crystals’ are liquid (they adapt to the square) the size of the elements was not importantanymore. So I could re-take these old pieces into the new time now, I have re-used them, re-connected them.
This ‘expansion’ offered me more possibilities: I re-used the material I already had without loss of material or time. The possibility to re-make the old pieces still exists. And it gave me two new pieces. So I multiplied my possibilities. A new life.

 Noon Passama Formal Research - A necklace, 2015 / Formal Research - H rings, 2015 Rigid clay, silver, gold  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Noon Passama Formal Research – A necklace, 2015 / Formal Research – H rings, 2015 Rigid clay, silver, gold  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

 Formal Research – A necklace (2015) composing of six chain units is the starting point of the group of six rings. A closed-end loop of each ring was divided in sections, one / two / three /… / six, by the difference between the fat and thin parts. The works were made under the following keywords: dividing / sequencing / sizing.
Formal Research initially focused on one classical type of jewellery: the chain. The project is mainly about the form of each connecting chain unit and how the unit connects to its neighbours.
During the sculpting process, the shapes were transformed because of them being in the hand and through time. I did not edit the outcomes and will present the rings as they are. The try-outs are the finals and vice versa.

 Stefano Marchetti Untitled brooch, 2007 / Untitled Revisited brooch, 2015 Silver, silver and titan powder, epoxy resin  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Stefano Marchetti Untitled brooch, 2007 / Untitled Revisited brooch, 2015 Silver, silver and titan powder, epoxy resin  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.:

 In the Nineties, in the making of the older brooch, my goal was to control the metal, to have the metal do whatever I wanted. In this latest brooch, made a few days ago, I let instead the metal take control over myself, and let it take me wherever its will would go.

Tore Svensson Mr. T brooch, 2011 / Mr. T Revisited brooch, 2015 (5 different versions) Veneer wood, acrylic paint, silver  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015.: Tore Svensson Mr. T brooch, 2011 / Mr. T Revisited brooch, 2015 (5 different versions) Veneer wood, acrylic paint, silver  New work designed for Klimt02 Gallery in occasion of the exhibition To Recover, Barcelona, October 2015

The reason why I chosen my self-portrait, is that it is probably one of my most well known pieces of jewellery. It is made in steel and etched.  The material and techniques I mostly work with. For the Re-version I saw out the silhouette in 2 mm veneer, divided the image in 3 parts and painted them in similar but for each piece different colours, before I glued them together. The fact that they are divided in three parts, with the dark sawing-line between, gives them a comic-like impression.
This impression is even emphasised by the bigger size, which is possible by the lightness of the material, and is completely different from the original steel-one. While the surface of the steel-portrait and other previous work was the key technology for building the image, the colour for some years been a part of my jewellery.

 

To revisit, remake, salvage, reinterpret, adapt, convert, converse, rethink…
  Why have we asked some of the artists we work with as gallery owners to reinterpret one of their works? We could say it’s because we’re interested in talking about time. And by “revisiting” we mean discussing the notion of time. But in what way? That’s the question.
Time passes, it is made, interpreted, felt and suffered, it escapes, drifts away, becomes trapped or stretched, sometimes it is intelligently ignored and, why not, it is exercised. Reinterpreting a work, a fiction or precis is a way of addressing time, a way of exploring a landscape in order to try and understand it. And we thought this exercise would provide an interesting opportunity to discuss time.
Revisiting in order to reflect… an exercise for the artist.
  Are there any changes in these artists’ works? Should there be? Is time involved? Without a shadow of a doubt, the answer is yes. But that barely scrapes the surface of what we want to know.
We’re more likely to find out what we want to know if the work enables us to answer questions such as: What kind of time is involved? Is there any usefulness? Is there any spirituality? Are there any aesthetics? Is there any abstraction? Is there any progress?
The exhibition is also designed to be understood through an analysis of the different types of answers provided by the works as a whole. As you will see, there are answers that simplify, offering minor changes, non-answers, coherent answers (if you have prior knowledge of the artist’s trajectory), inspired answers, uninventive answers… As we have said, evaluating the “revisits” as a whole provides additional knowledge.
When it comes down to it, what we most value is the sensation we observe and feel when the artist takes some distance and moves away from the centre stage in an attempt to provide an answer. As observers, we believe this circumstance helps to achieve universality and thus provide an intellectual satisfaction, that of communicating and objectifying the creation to the full in order to express and play with a more authentic reality.
Revisiting in order to look afresh… the viewer’s exercise.
We switch from observation to understanding, and vice versa. We observe in order to find differences between similar things and we understand when we find similarities between different things. Accustomed as we are today to viewing several pieces in a highly random fashion, pausing to stop in order to take a fresh look at a work “inaugurated” some time ago is another exercise we wish to propose. This exercise may help us assimilate better in this era of accumulation and, on occasions, superficiality. There can be no doubt that the way in which a work attracts and engages us is based on the knowledge we may have of it.
Knowledge without criticism is an indication of the end of everything. Yet, on the other hand, what can be said of criticism without knowledge? Are we capable of enjoying what these workers of art offer us? Will we be capable of evaluating what they show us? Can we offer knowledge-based criticism? Frankly, we find there is a lack of humility on the part of the viewer. And we’re all viewers.
Let’s enjoy this opportunity.

 

 

Klimt02 Gallery
Riera de Sant Miquel 65
08006 -  Barcelona
Monday to Friday / 11 -14 and 16-19 h.

 

 

 

16/03/2015

After Identity Crisis: Ceci n’est pas “art jewellery” (2/4) by Ezra Satok-Wolman

Classé dans : Ezra SATOK-WOLMAN (CA),Reflexion,www Klimt02 — bijoucontemporain @ 21:39

« For real change to occur, action needs to take place. My intention with “Identity Crisis” was to drop a pebble into the water and hope that some of the ripples turned into waves. It is in that spirit that I am publishing this follow up essay.
(This is the second part of a text that will be published in 4 individual texts. Read the previous article: Part 1 ) »

After Identity Crisis: Ceci n’est pas “art jewellery” (2/4).

There are galleries, fairs, exhibitions, university programs, museum collections and stacks of books dedicated to art jewellery.  Art jewellery has gone global.  So how can art jewellery be dead?  The reality is art jewellery isn’t dead, but it has become unrecognizable.  One of the biggest problems that I see today is that art jewellery has become an “umbrella term,” used to refer to a number of different types of jewellery and philosophies about jewellery that collectively create a fairly schizophrenic personality.  It might be more appropriate to suggest that art jewellery has multiple personalities and may at times present itself as craft jewellery, alternative jewellery, or small scale conceptual art (that may or may not function as jewellery at all).

  • One of the biggest problems that I see today is that art jewellery has become an “umbrella term,” used to refer to a number of different types of jewellery and philosophies about jewellery that collectively create a fairly schizophrenic personality

Art jewellery should be more successful today than it has ever been, yet we have continued to slump even further into decline as the field has grown and as time has passed.  Our tendency has been to look for external reasons for our struggles, but I believe it is time we accept that the problems lie within what art jewellery has come to be, rather than factors that have impacted it.  We can no longer blame an unstable economy for the lack of art jewellery sales because the jewellery market in general is booming.  In a recent article about the Birmingham School of Jewellery’s 125th anniversary, Professional Jeweller Magazine1 reported that the UK has seen consistent growth in the jewellery and watch industry since 2009 valuing it today at £5 billion annually.  Why then has art jewellery struggled so terribly?  The contemporary art world is also booming, and it shouldn’t be so crazy to think that art jewellery should be enjoying similar success.  I can’t help but think that the problem must lie within the realm of art jewellery itself because things seem to be fine in the outside world.

  • The extremist approach to art jewellery has guided artists to become consumed with trying to reinvent jewellery, rather than focus on making jewellery art that other people will both react to and want to wear

The problems that have arisen regarding art jewellery’s sustainability may have more to do with issues that are not fundamentally relevant to jewellery at all, but rather relate to radical ideologies about art jewellery that have heavily influenced trends within the field.  We have allowed extremism and dogmatism to take the reigns and now find ourselves asking how we got here.  It is not that people don’t want to buy art jewellery, but perhaps more likely that people don’t want to buy this art jewellery.  The extremist approach to art jewellery has guided artists to become consumed with trying to reinvent jewellery, rather than focus on making jewellery art that other people will both react to and want to wear.  Looking at the full spectrum of what is produced today under the guise of art jewellery might have you questioning how many artists are capable of actually producing good functional jewellery.  Experimentation seems to take precedence over technique. “Narratives” and “concept” have become far more important than the end result.  Craftsmanship and attention to detail seem to be a thing of the past, and too much of either could have people telling you that you’re not an artist at all.  Ted Noten recently spoke about being criticized for this as an art student in a recent interview with The New York Times2 and was quoted saying; “if you want to be an artist you should have the tools and skills to make something.  If you want to come up with concepts, be a writer.”

While I am a dedicated supporter of art jewellery in all forms, the field could certainly benefit from some distinctions being made between the kinds of art jewellery being produced right now.   As art jewellery has grown and developed, a number of facets have taken shape and the term art jewellery has come to represent a diverse range of things, including at times costume, multi-media installations and performance art.  It may be unfair to say that art jewellery in general has failed or has become irrelevant, because some facets are doing much better than others.  There are certain kinds of art jewellery that will always appeal to the market better than others.  There are tremendous differences between the kind of customer that is looking for a highly conceptual piece of “jewellery art” for their private collection, and the customer that is looking for a piece of art jewellery to wear.  I am fairly confident that the number of customers looking to purchase well made art jewellery that can be worn will always outnumber those looking to buy unwearable or overly conceptual pieces that can not be worn.  For the purposes of clear communication and good marketing, it might not be such a bad idea to represent this kind of highly conceptual work separately altogether.  While there may be a place for conceptual jewellery within the spectrum of art jewellery, to have expectations that it will have success on its own commercially may still be unrealistic.

Beyond highly conceptual jewellery, the need to distinguish between art jewellery and craft jewellery is also crucial.  For too long we have allowed serial and edition craft work to masquerade as art jewellery.  Too many makers have resorted to focussing on multiple “editions” or serial work, which may appeal to requests from galleries for “new collections,” but often devalues the pieces overall.   As more makers attend fairs to exhibit and sell their work, art jewellery has been altered to fit the needs of the wholesale format.  Once again this is very reminiscent of craft jewellery, as artists look for ways to produce inexpensive multiples and work within margins.  The market is changing for galleries too, many of which are now spending a good amount of time in the field attending fairs themselves.  Contemporary art and design fairs have become hotbeds of activity for both artists and galleries, but it’s still too soon to say what kind of support will be cultivated in the form of new followers and collectors.

  •  Ultimately it is the audience or market that determines the value of the art we make.  We can only sell our pieces for what people are willing to pay, if they are willing to pay anything at all. 

I often hear people proclaiming that more art jewellery isn’t purchased because the audience isn’t educated, and doesn’t understand the value of what they are looking at.  I happen to disagree with this statement and have found quite the opposite in my experience.  People who have an interest in art jewellery tend to be quite educated.  They also tend to have both an understanding of, and appreciation for art and craftsmanship.  Ultimately it is the audience or market that determines the value of the art we make.  We can only sell our pieces for what people are willing to pay, if they are willing to pay anything at all.  Regardless of how educated the audience is or isn’t, they directly contribute to the valuation and commercial success or failure of an artist’s work, more so than galleries do.  You can’t fake craftsmanship, and it’s something that people have simply come to expect when it comes to jewellery whether you work in gold, plastic, paper or textile.

  • It may be fair to say that there is currently a lot of good craft jewellery and conceptual art being made by people who call themselves jewellery artists.  But calling something art jewellery and something actually being art jewellery are two very different things.

Art jewellery has changed dramatically over the last decade.  When I think back to what art jewellery was about when I first became interested in it, I remember a vastly different landscape.  Fundamentally speaking, art jewellery was about artists making jewellery.  The art jewellery movement began when artists who were highly skilled jewellery makers, started exploring different approaches to jewellery making that were outside the traditional boundaries of conventional jewellery. These artists experimented with various kinds of materials, forms, and techniques, developing a field that at the time was quite radical.  Art jewellery was about more than stringing together bits and pieces, or assembling collections of found objects.  Using alternative materials, casual construction, and giving the piece a socio-political title was not enough to qualify something as art jewellery.  It may be fair to say that there is currently a lot of good craft jewellery and conceptual art being made by people who call themselves jewellery artists.  But calling something art jewellery and something actually being art jewellery are two very different things.

  • Virtual success is measured by social media ratings which in turn has only fed our need for instant gratification.  In a “fast food” like manner we are constantly bombarded with content, giving us little time to digest between servings.

Before the internet became a mainstream resource and tool for communication, the information available about art jewellery was not only limited, but carefully curated as well.  “Information” came in the form of physical exhibitions, books and magazines.  There were no websites or blogs and therefore information was available periodically and for the most part regionally.  Today we each have our own websites or social media “channels,” and information is made available in real-time.  New work is “published” daily and essentially with little to no filter.  The internet has become the ultimate platform for the work we produce, providing artists with the ability to virtually exhibit and sell their work to a global marketplace.  Virtual success is measured by social media ratings which in turn has only fed our need for instant gratification.  In a “fast food” like manner we are constantly bombarded with content, giving us little time to digest between servings.

The art jewellery spectrum has been stretched beyond imagination.  Sometimes it seems as though artists are merely competing to see who can take jewellery to the furthest points of abstraction, physically and philosophically, while others compete to see who can use or repurpose the most obscure materials or objects in a quest to create the “nouvo-collage” on a pin or a string.  This is a complete departure from what art jewellery is intended to be, and a departure that I attribute in part to extremism.  Extremism has convinced students year after year that in order to succeed as a jewellery artist, they must reinvent art jewellery  and the materials they use to create it.  Extremism has replaced skill and technique with ego and shock value.  While I have seen some very interesting and thought provoking things arise from this extremist approach to art jewellery over the years, I would venture to say that it is work of the “extremist art jeweller” that could be pronounced dead rather than art jewellery in general.  If you look at the ideologies at either end of the “art jewellery spectrum,” what you will find are extreme interpretations of jewellery that may not have much potential for commercial success.

In my opinion, if you remove the craft jewellery, alternative jewellery, and the extreme conceptual jewellery from the mix, there really isn’t a tremendous amount of art jewellery being produced, and much of it probably does quite well in terms of sales.  The “art jewellery umbrella” currently covers a lot of work by default that quite frankly would be more accurately described as something else.  A good example of this dynamic exists at Sieraad Art Fair, the annual event in Amsterdam dedicated to art jewellery.  It was my experience at Sieraad that while there was some art jewellery at the fair, the work was primarily a mix of craft jewellery, alternative jewellery and highly conceptual jewellery.  I believe  Ward Schriver was making the same declaration in his review of the 2013 edition of the fair for Art Jewelry Forum,3 in which he concluded by saying; “If you are keen on seeing, and possibly buying, a great diversity of affordable, “modern” jewelry, you’ll have a field day at Sieraad.”

  • Many artists no longer think enough about who or if anyone will ever wear their jewellery, which has led to a complete disconnect with the wearer

Today’s iteration of art jewellery has been diluted.  Our standards have simply been watered down. Craftsmanship, functionality, and synthesis of concept and form are no longer important when assessing the success or failure of a piece. Photographs and artist’s statements have become more valuable currency than the objects themselves, often obscuring the true nature of the pieces they document, or how well or poorly they are made. The foundation skills necessary for making jewellery  are no longer required to make art jewellery, or so it would seem.  Some groups will tell you that a piece of art jewellery need not function as jewellery at all, as long as the intention exists.  Many artists no longer think enough about who or if anyone will ever wear their jewellery, which has led to a complete disconnect with the wearer.  Artists no longer produce jewellery for people to wear, but rather to build portfolios and develop their own artistic identities.  The wearer or end user has been erased from the equation, and herein lies another one of our critical dilemmas.  Jewellery is something that people need to have a very personal and individual connection with, much more so than art which is generally intended for a broader public audience.  Finding a happy medium can often be the biggest challenge when making art jewellery and must at least begin with a desire to do so.

1 Professional Jeweller – Jan 23, 2015, by Sarah Louise Jordan
http://www.professionaljeweller.com/article-15570-why-birmingham-is-boosting-the-jewellery-industry/

The New York Times – Dec 4, 2014, by Nina Siegal
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/12/05/style/international/ted-noten-jewelry-artist-brings-macabre-art-to-miami.html?_r=1

3 Art Jewelry Forum – Dec 23, 2013, by Ward Schriver
http://www.artjewelryforum.org/conference-fair-reviews/the-sieraad-fair-in-amsterdam

published by Klimt02

07/03/2015

During SCHMUCK 2015 – EXPO ‘In Between by Sigurd Bronger’ – Galerie RA (NL) – 11-17 Mars 2015

Galerie Ra on Frame / Schmuck : From 11 to 17 March Galerie Ra will present its artists at the Frame fair in Munich, with special focus on new work by Sigurd Bronger.
During this week Galerie Ra will be closed.

Sigurd Bronger Pendant: Carrying device for a Ted Noten piece, 2014Sigurd Bronger, carrying device for a Ted Noten piece, pendant, 2014

« In Between by Sigurd Bronger » Exhibition : 28 Feb-11 Apr 2015 at Galerie Ra – Amsterdam NL
 At the latest body of work, Sigurd Bronger presents jewellery which incorporates a specific material or object secured in a holder. Using natural and existing artefacts, the artist moves between wearable jewellery and art objects.

DURING SCHMUCK : 11th -17th of March 2015, Handwerksmesse, Munich
Galerie RA Hall B1 Booth 765   FRAME
AND , 28th February – 11th of April 2015, Galerie RA – Amsterdam NL

Galerie Ra on Frame / Schmuck From 11 to 17 March   [Sigurd Bronger Pendant: Carrying device for a haematite ball, 2014]Sigurd Bronger Pendant: Carrying device for a haematite ball, 2014

«  »It is almost 10 years since I had a exhibition at Galerie Ra, Amsterdam. So for this exhibition, I constructed different carrying devices that relates to the issue “in between”. I have chosen to use some of the same material  I used in my earlier exhibitions at Ra. Materials like: Egg, different stones, cactus spike, diamond, shell, and so on. There are some new materials as well; which I have not used before. Many of the carrying devices have a construction that holds the material in between the construction. The issue of in between  can also be seen upon the space between the material and the construction, and in some of the pieces they contain different spaces in between the material itself. Some of the new pieces can be placed in between functional jewellery art  and objects. »  Sigurd Bronger

« Sigurd Bronger has made a collection of rings, booches and pendants called ‘Carrying Devices’. The collective theme In Between refers to the construction of this jewellery which incorporates a specific material or object secured in a holder. Sigurd either constructs this holder himself or makes it from existing artefacts. While the materials secured in these holders were previously natural in nature, such as an egg, a stone or a shell, nowadays he also uses materials from medical science or technology. The contrast between the generally robust steel holder and the fragile or delicate item this holds generates an amusing absurdity. With some pieces a magnifying glass ‘In Between’ the viewer and the object creates extra focus. For this collection Sigurd has once again reused an iconic piece of jewellery by an artist colleague, the Chewing Gum Brooch by Ted Noten. Sigurd Bronger’s work positions itself ‘In Between’ wearable jewellery and art objects »

Sigurd Bronger, 100 cubic zirconia, ring, metal, glass, zirconiaSigurd Bronger, 100 cubic zirconia, ring, metal, glass, zirconia

 Sigurd Bronger Brooch: Carrying device for a goose egg, 2015 Goose egg, rubber, steel, chrome plated brass.Sigurd Bronger Brooch: Carrying device for a goose egg, 2015 Goose egg, rubber, steel, chrome plated brass.

Sigurd Bronger Pendant: Wearing device for 50001 spheres, 2014 Silver, bronze, steel, leather cord Front viewSigurd Bronger Pendant: Wearing device for 50001 spheres, 2014 Silver, bronze, steel, leather cord Front view
Sigurd Bronger Brooch: Carrying device for a smile in between, 2015 Soft neoprene rubber, steel, silverSigurd Bronger Brooch: Carrying device for a smile in between, 2015 Soft neoprene rubber, steel, silver

 

Galerie RA
Nes 120
1012 Amsterdam
The Netherlands
P  +1 206 265100
F  +1 206 204595
mail@galerie-ra.nl
http://www.galerie-ra.nl

 

17/01/2015

EXPO ‘Beauty of the Beast: Jewellery & Taxidermy’ – Museum Arnhem (NL) – 24 Janv.-10 Mai 2015

Beauty of the Beast: Jewellery and Taxidermy -  Museum Arnhem, Netherlands

The museum presents the work of more than 15 international designers and artists for the exhibition, Beauty of the Beast.  The displayed works explore the connection between taxidermy, jewellery and visual arts.

Beauty of the Beast: Jewellery and Taxidermy 24 Jan-10 May 2015 Museum Arnhem, NL (Reid Peppard – Head Piece: Double Rat Headdress, 2008)

Artist list : Karley Feaver — Charlie Tuesday Gates — Kate Gilliland — IdiotsBenjamin LignelMärta MattssonKelly McCallum — Kate MccGwire — Ted Noten — Reid Peppard — Iris Schieferstein — Simei Irene Snyman — Tinkebell — Cecilia Valentine — Emily Valentine — Tanel Veenre — Christel Verdaasdonk — Lisa WalkerJulia deVille — Niels van Eijk — Miriam van der Lubbe

From high-concept shops to cocktail bars: every style-conscious place these days displays a mounted fox or peacock in the window. Taxidermy, the mounting of dead animals, is hot. But what happens when you apply taxidermy to contemporary jewellery design? In the exhibition Beauty of the Beast Museum Arnhem presents the work of more than 15 international designers and artists who make a connection between taxidermy, jewellery and visual arts. The exhibition presents, on the one hand, wearable jewellery and fashion accessories such as necklaces, brooches, bags, hats, hair ornaments and shoes. But it also includes more sculptural and autonomous work.

Märta Mattsson Brooch: Crash!, 2011 Taxidermy bird, walnut wood, silverMärta Mattsson Brooch: Crash!, 2011 Taxidermy bird, walnut wood, silver

 Märta Mattsson Brooch: Palindrome, 2014 Cicada wings, resin, crushed sulphur, silver, glitterMärta Mattsson Brooch: Palindrome, 2014 Cicada wings, resin, crushed sulphur, silver, glitter

Emily Valentine,Vijf broches, Deconstructed Budgie, 2010. Foto: John LeeEmily Valentine,Vijf broches, Deconstructed Budgie, 2010. Foto: John Lee

Benjamin Lignel Piece: Io ce l'ho d'oro (yeah...but mine's gold), 2007  .Benjamin Lignel Piece: Io ce l’ho d’oro (yeah…but mine’s gold), 2007 Fine gold 6,5 x 3,4 x 3,4 cm Beak extension for pigeon photo: Enrico Bartolucci, Paris  An experiment on the ambivalent use of accessories to either mock, or ape, the demeanour of our betters. .

Tanel Veenre. rooch: Forever Together, 2014 Seahorses, wood, gold leaf, silver Photo by Tanel Veenre .Tanel Veenre. brooch: Forever Together, 2014 Seahorses, wood, gold leaf, silver Photo by Tanel Veenre

 Julia deVille Brooch: Bird Skull, 2004 Bird Skull, cubic zirconia, sterling silver 5 x 2.5 x 3 cmJulia deVille Brooch: Bird Skull, 2004 Bird Skull, cubic zirconia, sterling silver 

Kelly McCallum broochKelly McCallum brooch

 

Museum Arnhem
Utrechtseweg 87
6812 AA -  Arnhem
NETHERLANDS
info@museumarnhem.nl
tel +31(0)26 30 31 400

10/09/2014

EXPO ‘Ted Noten: Gold, Sweat and Pearls/Retro – 25 years Ted Noten’ – Putti Art Gallery, Rīga (Latvia/lettonie) – 19 Sept.-11 Oct. 2014

Classé dans : Exposition/Exhibition,Gal. Putti (LV),Lettonie (LV),Ted NOTEN (NL),www Klimt02 — bijoucontemporain @ 0:06

Ted Noten: Gold, Sweat and Pearls/Retro – 25 years Ted Noten

Ted Noten - Gal. Putti(7 Necessities For Every Woman by Atelier Ted Noten)

Dutch jewellery designer Ted Noten started his career in the early nineties when he worked as a soloist. Since 2005 he has been going by the name of Atelier Ted Noten. His pieces vary from handmade jewellery and sculptural objects bordering on jewellery design, to installations, videos and projects for museums or public spaces.

« Jewellery holds so many opportunities to communicate. It forms a direct link to being human, to small things, to the absurd nature of fate, and the psychology behind traditions, cutting right across the times and nationalities« , according to jewellery designer Ted Noten.

In the nineteen sixties a number of jewellery designers started studying the possibilities of using other, cheaper materials as well in their designs. And they studied the question if jewellery could express ideas that reached beyond beauty. Ted Noten followed in the footsteps of this first generation of ‘conceptual designers’. But right from the start he also distinguished himself from them, for instance for his ability to reconcile widely differing worlds. Although he comments on the traditional world of jewellery, making clear statements, he celebrates it at the same time. He will never shrink from using unconventional materials, but he will just as easily work precious materials into his pieces if their story demands it. Noten enjoys nothing so much as operating on the fringes of his profession, or even going slightly over the edge. Like a relative outsider he has taken in both the conventional world of jewellery and its target group, and the conceptual avant-garde.

I enjoy creating work that will set people on the wrong track. Your story can only get through to people if you rob them of their prejudices about jewellery. Inspiration can be found anywhere: in the street, around the corner, in an extraordinary picture, or by contrast in an unpretentious little story someone will tell me. »

The exhibition includes and interactive and provocative installation ”Wanna Swap Your Ring” with 500 Miss Piggy rings, made of 3D-printed nylon in shocking pink, on the wall of the exhibition space, all placed within the imaginary contours of a handgun. Spectators can obtain a ring made by the master by replacing it with an old one of theirs. What counts is not the value. Noten is equally happy to receive precious rings or cheap ones. What counts is the exchange of old stories and new ones. All the stories together will gradually fill the pistol-shape, changing the symbol of aggression into a charming and multi-faceted scene.

So far the project has been created in three cities; Tokyo (Japan), Stockholm (Sweden) and Wellington (New Zealand). Other cities will follow, including London, Paris, Milan, Sydney, São Paulo, New York and Moscow. When he has been to 15 cities, Noten intends to display all the original presentations alongside each other.

The exhibition includes a documentary „Ted Noten: Gold, Sweat & Pearls”.

Jewellery designer Ted Noten (1956) is well-known for his cheeky pieces of jewellery. Are they wearable? Not necessarily. Are they provocative? Absolutely. A series of see-through purses containing a gun, a chameleon or a line of coke with a pearl necklace…

Noten: “I make jewellery that takes some time getting used to. When you wear it, you make yourself vulnerable as it makes such a striking statement. I speak out through my jewellery and objects. I comment upon jewellery as a phenomenon, upon the industry or – like any artist – upon humanity.

Atelier Ted Noten: Wanna swap your ring?  Atelier Ted Noten: Wanna swap your ring?

Wanna swap your ring? Ted NotenWanna swap your ring? Ted Noten

 

Putti Art Gallery
(Rīga, Latvia)
30-Oct-2014 – 15-Nov-2014Putti Art Gallery
16 Mārstaļu iela
1050 – Rīga
Latvia
Telephone: +371 67214229
Fax: +371 67214230

website: www.putti.lv
mail: gallery@putti.lv

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