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22/02/2015

During SCHMUCK 2015 – EXPO ‘Mythen/Myths 2015′ – Galerie Weltraum, Munich (DE) – 11-17 Mars 2015

«Mythen/Myths 2015» A contemporary insight in precious Greece

Galerie Weltraum

Opening: 11 March, 7 – 10 p.m.
Sofia Zarari,  "Chronos", 2013, Photo credit: Myrto KoutoulSofia Zarari  -  « Chronos », 2013, Photo credit: Myrto Koutoul
Thirteen visual artists, architects and designers and four guest stars turn their daily experience in Greece into jewellery: family violence, mother’s Alzheimer, unconditional love, negation of death, bankruptcy, androgynous sexuality, Charlie hebdo’s impact on freedom of speech etc.
Exhibits make part of a sculptural, walk-in installation reminding of a broken ancient Greek temple or a human-sized trap, a double symbol for the Greek crisis. Daily art performances inspired by contemporary Greek culture reflect on archaic uses of jewellery.
« The Greek drama is taking place right now, almost a third of the young do not have a job, many people live hard lives. Their hardships can be connected to the suffering that heroes from the great Greek stories underwent. Our contemporary dramas both in world politics as in our personal lives resemble those tragedies described in the great Greek theater.
We lose a loved one, we encounter unfaithfulness, we are in warlike situations due to real war or we seem to be in a battle to keep our health or sanity and all of us cope with these things in different ways. All these themes are expressed in the great Greek myths. Every Greek is steeped in her or his heritage as I know from having travelled many times in Greece.
For the artists of this show their Greek background is a focal point that one can always go back to. In the jewelry and other art, made by the exhibiting artists the Greek myth has been an enormous rich well to draw from as you will see.  »
Marietta de Bruïne, Art historian, Amsterdam.
Artists: Katerina GlykaChristina KarababaAnna Kitsou –  Maro KornilakiYakinthi OikonomouSofia PaschouLoukia RichardsHeleni Siousti — Margarita Skokou — Eleftheria SpantidakiSystemalab (Sofia Daniilidou) — Konstantina Tzavidopoulou — Marianna Tzouti — Sofia Zarari
Guest artists: Eugenia Feroussi — Elina Kakourou — Katerina Kolonellou — Sofia Paschou.

 Yakinthi Oikonomou, Bonds, 2014, Photo by Orestis Rovakis
Yakinthi Oikonomou, Bonds, 2014, Photo by Orestis Rovakis
 Yakinthi Oikonomou  -"Tough love", Mixed technique, Canelloni, paper, silver, 2014 Photo credit: Orestis Rovakis  Yakinthi Oikonomou  - »Tough love », Mixed technique, Canelloni, paper, silver, 2014 Photo credit: Orestis Rovakis
  SYSTEMALAB Ring: Peristerionas Rings, 2013 Photo by: SYSTEMALABSYSTEMALAB Ring: Peristerionas 3D printed Rings, 2013 Photo by: SYSTEMALAB
Loukia Richards, "Sirens", 2013 Photo credit: Christoph Ziegler  Loukia Richards, « Pornogirls/Sirens », 2013 Photo credit: Christoph Ziegler
 Anna Kitsou, Athens  Anna Kitsou, “Kyklikos Chronos” (“Κυκλικός χρόνος”), 2012, Ρhoto credit: Giannis SeferosAnna Kitsou’s reference to aesthetics can be traced back to the Neolithic settlements, the Acropolis of Tiryns with the Cyclopean Walls, the Cycladic idols or the harmonious aerial photographs of excavations.  Her jewellery reflects magic rituals and the hope of humankind that with fire, gemstones and knots can gain control over destiny. Long before the construction of houses, roads, airplanes or refrigerators, mortals created jewellery to give them strength to confront not only enemies of the terrestrial world, but also the demons from beyond.  Jewellery was a companion for eternity, emphasizing faith in immortality.
“Each piece is a journey through land, water and fire… My inspiration is the Earth, Greece and cultures,” says the young designer and ceramist.
Mix & match of shapes and materials by Maro Kornilakh Mix & match of shapes and materials by Maro Kornilakh
"Synapsis/Alzheimer". Work in progress by Heleni Siousti. 2015  for Myths 2015 @ SCHMUCK Munich Jewellery Week: Heleni Siousti « Synapsis/Alzheimer ». Work in progress  2015 -
Helices or spirals are characteristic patterns of ancient Greek jewellery. They symbolize the moon, mazes, snails, snakes, ebb and flow, cyclical time, regeneration, perpetual motion, echo, appearance and disappearance, consciousness and unconsciousness, memory and oblivion, even the human brain itself.
The jewellery of Helen Siousti, often unfinished or imperfect, signifies memory fading away due to Alzheimer disease.
It illustrates the pain of those who, unable to act, watch their loved ones crossing the river of Lethe while being alive. Her pieces are relics of beautiful, powerful moments – the offspring of the unknown future and love.
Heleni Siousti uses her art to unite robust remembrances with glimpses of memory in an attempt to explain how fragile and vulnerable we become through the memory of what has been and will not be — no more.
She hauls childhood fears to the surface, fears which become alive as our parents walk slowly, but steadily, towards the dark forest of fairy tales while we – like helpless Hop-o’-My-Thumbs – have only crumbs in our pockets to help them trace the path leading back to us…
Heleni Siousti studied Economics in Athens and worked in the private sector. She is an acrtive member of the ecological movement in her home town Kozani in Macedonia.

Christina Karababa, Peace man! "Bang-Bang 1", 2014 Photo credit: Christina Karababa - Myths 2015 @ SCHMUCK, Munich Jewellery Week 11-17 March Galerie Weltraum: Peace man!  -  Christina Karababa, « Bang-Bang 1″, 2014 Photo credit: Christina Karababa

and should god Hephaestus, the famous blacksmith of Olympus, continue making weapons and jewellery in his workshop, he would possibly use a 3D printer.
Renowned for its decoration and apotropaic/defensive perfection is the shield Hephaistos made for Achilles.
Bang bang!
The sound of the gun in comic strips suits the myth of revolutionary subversion of aesthetics standards.
Such myths are endlessly created by fashion and technology in modern urban centers.
Everything goes, but in a different way…
« In my work I mould odd objects with contradictions as far as their operation, meaning and interpretation are concerned. These items should be conceived mostly as comments, as toys or as dangerous and naive fantasies, » writes Christina Karababa.
The artist teaches in Applied Science University Düsseldorf. She has held numerous individual and group exhibitions and co-curated the international art jewellery meeting « Zimmerhof Symposium » in 2014.
"war-like jewellery" of Katerina Glyka  Katerina Glyka  – « Lethal Jewellery » -  « war-like jewellery » of Katerina Glyka which has as starting point scenographic imitations of archaic weapons made with the technique of paper mache and ends up being potentially lethal tools made from cement.

 

Galerie Weltraum
Rumfordstrasse 26, Munich
Opening 11.03.2015 19:00 – 22:00
12.03.2015 – 17.03.2015
14:00 – 20:00
Rumfordstrasse 26, Munich
Opening 11.03.2015 19:00 – 22:00
Mail: info@weltraum26.de
tel : 0175 1121656

https://www.facebook.com/weltraum.me

 

 

01/11/2014

EXPO ‘YOUTH MOVEMENT!’ – Kath Libbert Jewellery Gallery (UK) – 13 Nov. 2014 – 25 janv. 2015

YOUTH MOVEMENT ! NINE NEW GRADUATES -

Meet the Contemporary Jewellery World’s Next Generation!

THURSDAY 13TH NOV 6PM – 9PM

MANY OF THE GRADUATES WILL BE PRESENT AND DELIGHTED TO TALK TO YOU ABOUT THEIR WORK.
15% OFF ALL PURCHASES MADE ON THE NIGHT! -
FOR A FULL YOUTH MOVEMENT! CATALOGUE PLEASE SEE : www.kathlibbertjewellery.co.uk

 YOUTH MOVEMENT! NINE NEW GRADUATES -  ( bangle by Natalie Lee, a graduate from Birmingham School of Jewellery.)( bangle by Natalie Lee, a graduate from Birmingham School of Jewellery.)

Meet the Contemporary Jewellery World’s Next Generation:
Beth Spowart, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee; Jaki Coffey, National College of Art and Design, Dublin; Karen Elizabeth Donovan, Edinburgh College of Art; Rebecca E Smith, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee; Natalie Lee, Birmingham School of Jewellery; Prudence Horrocks, Edinburgh College of Art; Lindsay Hill, Glasgow School of Art; Georgia Rose West, Colchester School of Art and Design, University of Essex; Rosie Deegan, Nottingham Trent University.

 ‘Overgrown’ – neckpiece in titanium, niobium and precious white metal by Karen Elizabeth Donovan, Edinburgh College of Art.Karen Elizabeth Donovan – ‘Overgrown’ – neckpiece in titanium, niobium & precious white metal - Edinburgh College of Art.

 Karen Elizabeth Donovan, Edinburgh College of Art; ‘Highland Clan Badges: Murray’ in titanium and steel, modelled - Kath Libbert Jewellery Gallery -YOUTH MOVEMENT!Karen Elizabeth Donovan, Edinburgh College of Art; ‘Highland Clan Badges: Murray’ in titanium and steel, modelled ‘Flawless’ – ring in oxidised silver with kinetic cubic zirconia by Lindsay Hill, Glasgow School of Art.Lindsay Hill – ‘Flawless’ – ring in oxidised silver with kinetic cubic zirconia – Glasgow School of Art.

 Lindsay Hill, Glasgow School of Art - ‘Three Stone’ – brooch in oxidised silver with kinetic cubic zirconiaLindsay Hill, Glasgow School of Art – ‘Three Stone’ – brooch in oxidised silver with kinetic cubic zirconia‘Lust in Found - Skip’ forced perspective skip brooch - powder coated steel and copper, magnets and found objects by Jaki Coffey, National College of Art and Design, Dublin. Jaki Coffey – ‘Lust in Found – Skip’ forced perspective skip brooch – powder coated steel and copper, magnets & found objects – National College of Art and Design, Dublin.

Jaki Coffey, National College of Art and Design, Dublin - ‘Lust in Found - Skips’ - 9 flat, forced perspective Skip Brooches - powder coated copper, magnetic backs and magnetic found object 'rubbish'Jaki Coffey, National College of Art and Design, Dublin – ‘Lust in Found – Skips’ – 9 flat, forced perspective Skip Brooches – powder coated copper, magnetic backs and magnetic found object ‘rubbish

Jaki Coffey, National College of Art and Design, Dublin - ‘Lust in Found - Pip, Pippet & Bob neckpieces with option of attaching skip brooch via hidden magnet : gold plated copper, found objects, magnets Jaki Coffey, National College of Art and Design, Dublin – ‘Lust in Found – Pip, Pippet & Bob neckpieces with option of attaching skip brooch via hidden magnet : gold plated copper, found objects, magnets

Kath Libbert Jewellery Gallery is delighted to introduce Nine New Graduates buzzing on our radar this year.
Technology meets art meets jewellery in this amazing collection that includes Smart Materials colour changing jewellery; Fill Your Own bright yellow Skip Brooches; kinetic gemstone rings; tough titanium Highland Clan Thistle Brooches; Wired Wearables – dramatic neckpieces and bangles drawn in steel – just a few of the visual treats created by this year’s New Wave!
Based at Salts Mill since 1996, Kath Libbert Jewellery Gallery is renowned for its annual pick of the crop of new talents from across the UK’s universities. Curator Kath Libbert who selected the nine artists says ‘I always look for individuality and a fresh approach and the work of this year’s graduates is sure to surprise and stimulate!’
Moving Onwards and Upwards:
Beth Spowart, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee – 1st Class Honours, uses Smart Materials to create innovative jewellery which interacts uniquely with each individual wearer by changing colours through the stimulus of their body heat – an exciting experience for the wearer and definitely a conversation opener!
Jaki Coffey, National College of Art and Design, Dublin – 1st Class Honours, loves searching out treasure in skips and uses this as her inspiration for a series of funky bright yellow impeccably made powder coated copper Skip Brooches – the wearer then chooses what to fill up their Skip with from a selection of colourful ‘rubbish’ – becoming the curator of their own jewellery and making a provocative poke at our notions of preciousness!
Rebecca E Smith, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee – 1st Class Honours, discovered 300 wonderful love letters sent between her grandparents during World War ll and wanted as a testament to both this love story and to the power of letter writing, now a lost art, to create sentimental one off brooches, earrings and necklaces capturing the original handwriting, old photographs and vintage colours in a subtle palette of enamels. On an interactive note, Rebecca invites visitors to this exhibition to let her create jewellery capturing their own personal artefacts.
Lindsay Hill, Glasgow School of Art, BA Honours, employs advanced digital technologies to set stones kinetically in her striking rings whose bold symmetrical lines are also inspired by the facets on the gemstones they house. Both supremely elegant and great fun – the glinting gem tilts backwards and forwards as you move!
Natalie Lee, Birmingham School of Jewellery, 1st Class Honours, crafts Wired Wearables a collection of dramatic arm and neckpieces. An extension of her drawings, the fluid lines in steel are skilfully manipulated using a PUK welder and then enamelled in deep greys with highlights of powder blue and mauve. The continuous play of light and shadow the pieces cast when worn “symbolise the transit of time, a progression representing both the past and the future.” she says.
Karen Elizabeth Donovan, Edinburgh College of Art, MA Distinction, masterfully moves that hardest of metals titanium to create exquisite filigree-like necklaces bracelets and Highland Clan brooches gently tinted in blues, greens and golds. Scotland’s rich social history, its flora, and the materiality of titanium are her inspiration: “Plants define the character of a Nation or place. In Vermont, where I was born, we define ourselves by the Maple Tree. In Scotland we are often defined by the Thistle…..Titanium has a certain feel to it; a noise it makes when I brush my hand across it, and a smell it creates when I pierce, file and sand it. It is lightweight, strong, durable, and springy. It presents challenges to overcome and work around. It is sensual and it is home.”
Prudence Horrocks, Edinburgh College of Art, MA, inspired by the drawn line and a desire to replicate the patterns that are possible in pen and ink into jewellery, has crafted a beautiful series of rings, brooches and necklaces. In a classic palette of matt white and black acrylic she has embedded fine lines of silver and gold, creating a sophisticated elegant and supremely wearable collection.
Georgia Rose West, Colchester School of Art and Design, University of Essex, BA Honours – creates delightful small copper bowls, forming the metal into fluid shapes embellished with a great variety of creamy enamel patterning, each one having its own personality.
Rosie Deegan, Nottingham Trent University, 1st Class Honours – a mixed media, glass and metalwork artist, presents a quirky humorous body of work For a Man of Substance. The ironic title refers to her collection of Impotent Tools – made from glass and precious metals, they are exquisitely handcrafted but practically pointless!

Natalie Lee, Birmingham School of Jewellery - ‘Wired Wearables’ – neckpiece in steel and enamel, modelledNatalie Lee, Birmingham School of Jewellery – ‘Wired Wearables’ – neckpiece in steel and enamel, modelled

Natalie Lee, ‘Wired Wearables’ – neckpiece in steel and enamel, modelled  Natalie Lee, ‘Wired Wearables’ – neckpiece in steel and enamel, modelled

Large Oval Brooch in oxidised silver and 9ct rose gold set into acrylic by Prudence Horrocks, Edinburgh College of Art.Prudence Horrocks – Large Oval Brooch in oxidised silver and 9ct rose gold set into acrylic – Edinburgh College of Art.

 Prudence Horrocks, Edinburgh College of Art; - Necklace in silver and 9ct gold set into acrylicPrudence Horrocks, Edinburgh College of Art; – Necklace in silver and 9ct gold set into acrylic‘Darling Margaret’ – earrings in enamelled copper with handwriting and tassels by Rebecca E Smith, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee.Rebecca E Smith – ‘Darling Margaret’ – earrings in enamelled copper with handwriting and tassels – Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee.

Rebecca E Smith, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee - ‘Swindon’ – brooch in enamelled copper with handwritingRebecca E Smith, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee – ‘Swindon’ – brooch in enamelled copper with handwriting

'Orange’ - earrings in Thermochromic Resin, dyed aluminium, brass and silver - Beth Spowart, Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee;Beth Spowart – ‘Orange’ – earrings in Thermochromic Resin, dyed aluminium, brass and silver – -  Duncan of Jordanstone College of Art and Design, Dundee

 

 

KATH LIBBERT JEWELLERY GALLERY
Salts Mill, Saltaire,
Bradford BD18 3LA. – UK
Tel/Fax 01274 599790.
info@kathlibbertjewellery.c…
www.kathlibbertjewellery.co.uk

OPEN DAILY 10 – 5.30 MON – FRI and 10 – 6 AT WEEKENDS

 

 

23/05/2013

Découverte : José MARIN … un monde de titan(e)

Classé dans : Espagne (ES),Jose MARIN (ES),MELTING POINT Valencia,metal — bijoucontemporain @ 0:17

José MARIN – Enfin… « découverte » … elle date d’il y a un an, à Valencia (Melting Point 2012) …. mais je suis lente à la détente parfois !
et il faut que j’avoue une chose (honteuse !) : j’ai beau admirer son travail, savoir que le travail du titane est difficile et admirer la prouesse technique, apprécier la gentillesse du créateur, je n’arrive pas à « accrocher » à ce fichu titane ………. pourtant ces bleus devraient me « titiller » …. en fait, ce qui m’attire dans ces bijoux ce sont les failles : creux, ruptures, accidents, où s’immiscent, se lovent, percent diamants, perles et pierres précieuses …. oui, des bijoux très sensuels, en creux et en courbes …..

José Marin - detail of a necklace at JOYA 2012José MARIN – detail of a necklace at JOYA 2012

"Nube espigada". Pendant: Titanium, gold and diamonds - José MarinJosé MARIN – « Nube espigada ». Pendant: Titanium, gold and diamonds

JOSE MARÍN - titanium earringsJosé MARIN – earrings « Cayeron mil chicas »- Titanium, gold and diamonds

« In my childhood , while playing at my father’s workshop, I dreamed of becoming myself a jeweller someday, and sometimes dreams come true, now I have fun as a professional jeweller.
When I choose a material it is always with the idea of transforming it into a magical object, capable of transporting viewers to any personal place they can imagine. My goal is to make jewellery that, as you look at it, can convey intangible aspects of nature: smell, joy, nostalgia, sensuality
At this time I have opted for Titanium, a unique metal. Its high hardness and toughness, the antithesis of the morphology, brings the challenge of making jewels by hand as Valencia craftsmen did 100 years ago, jewels made on the basis of an indomitable yet virtuous metal.
Combining Titanium with gold and precious stones, looking for new avenues for contemporary jewellery, giving full value to the work and not the materials.
The result is a very organic jewellery, inspired by botanical motives and large volumes. « 

José Marin - broche (JOYA 2012) - titanium, gold & tsavoriteJosé MARIN – broche (JOYA 2012) – titanium, gold & tsavorite

José Marin - "Sueños prohibidos". Earrings: Titanium, gold and amethystJosé MARIN – « Sueños prohibidos ». Earrings: Titanium, gold and amethyst

TITANIUM - José Marin - Today is a great day for me (dec 2012) , I am nominated as a finalist in the National Crafts Awards in the category of Product Award, this competition was organized by the Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade, we are 4 finalists and the winner will be known on the day of the award at an official ceremony.  The work I have submitted to the contest are collections of silver-titanium and gold-titanium.José MARIN-  brooch –

« Dec. 2012 – great day for me : I am nominated as a finalist in the National Crafts Awards in the category of Product Award, this competition was organized by the Ministry of Industry, Tourism and Trade (Spain), we are 4 finalists and the winner will be known on the day of the award at an official ceremony.  The work I have submitted to the contest are collections of silver-titanium and gold-titanium. »

Jose Marin    Brooch ''Pluma de Ganso'' Titanium, Silver, Gold and Amethyst.José MARIN   Brooch  »Pluma de Ganso » Titanium, Silver, Gold and Amethyst.

José Marin - "Quisiera encontrar" ring - titanium, rubies

José MARIN« Quisiera encontrar ». Ring: Titanium, gold and ruby 

José Marin - "La que no puedo olvidar". Bracelet: Titanium and goldJosé MARIN – « La que no puedo olvidar ». Bracelet: Titanium and gold

TITANIUM - Jose Marin - pulseraJosé MARIN – pulsera/bracelet

Jose Marin    Brooches of the series '' wallpaper'' Titanium & SilverJosé MARIN    Brooches of the series  » wallpaper » Titanium & Silver

12/09/2010

EXPO ‘Gésine HACKENBERG: Still Lifes’ – Sienna gallery, Lenox (USA) – 14 aout-12 sept. 2010

‘Still Lifes’ by Gesine Hackenberg at Sienna Gallery

Everyday objects as jewelry : Gesine Hackenberg’s latest jewelry collection, ‘Still Lifes’, is made out of table glassware that she has cut, ground, and re-purposed into brooches and necklaces.

 

EXPO 'Gésine HACKENBERG: Still Lifes' - Sienna gallery, Lenox (USA) - 14 aout-12 sept. 2010 dans COUP DE COEUR hack_feature

« The source of Gésine Hackenberg’s newest work, Still Lifes, lies in her study of 17th and 18th century Dutch still life paintings and their meaning, the tables exquisitely laden with the finest tableware and food. She re-interprets this perfect translation of the three to the two-dimensional, the realistic vista of the dishes, glasses and bowls, into her work. The Still Lifes collection consists of two groups: on the one hand brooches like small sculptures, carved from stone. On the other, brooches and necklaces in which everyday glassware has been cut and rearranged into new compositions, new still lifes. The body takes on the role of the canvas as it were and becomes a tableau vivant.  »

 

Gha52---53
Gesine Hackenberg - brooches – Left: Finnish Still Life, Finnish table glass (by Timo Sarpaneva); cut and ground. Right: Dutch and Finnish Still Life, Dutch (recent design by Aldo Bakker) and Finnish (vintage by Kristalunie Maastricht) table glass; cut and ground

 

Gha56
Gesine Hackenberg - Table Glass Neckpiece: Green Bottle Neckpiece. glass, silver 

gha43-44a dans Exposition/Exhibition
Gesine Hackenberg -  Table Glass: Green and Blue Dutch. Dutch Table Glass (vintage by Kristalunie Maastricht); cut and ground

« All My Treasure-
Occasionally, the realm of jewellery and commodities come together very closely…
Objects we use everyday become intimately precious and indispensable to us, just as it happens to a piece of jewellery we wear day in, day out.
On the one hand there are objects that help us to master our daily lives in a purely functional way. But on the other there are those to which we feel very close, to which we are joined as it were. Maybe this is because they’ve just always been there. Or maybe our mother and grandmother already used them. It might be just a tiny detail that fascinates us, almost nothing. Sometimes they seem to embody our wishes, moods, memories, a certain goal or habit, our affiliation with a certain group?
And then again they may not be really practical at all. But still we like using them and in a very personal way they seem to belong to us like we belong to them. For such an object adapts through our specific way of handling.
We love them. They become the jewels in our daily lives.
I’m fascinated by the aspect of personal preciousness revealed in all kinds of belongings. Especially in objects that seem to find a place close and near to the body. I explore how these pieces can relate to the body and examine this relationship through its connection.
The use of these things pertains to body measurement and the wearing of jewellery is about use in daily life.
My materials of choice are precious metals, antique ceramics, glass and textiles, as well as the very tough and resistant Japanese Urushi lacquer. These all come from interlocking themes of household, kitchen, table and food culture. These materials seem to embody this fleeting commonplace culture surrounding us by preserving it.
Often my objects and jewels, ‘kleinoden ‘ (Dutch for little treasures), are primarily small, autonomous objects. Either through its use (spoons) or an intervention in the original object (ceramic jewellery), a relationship with the body is established or the object is made wearable. I want to allow the object and the jewellery to exist in both environments.  » (Gésine Hackenberg)

 

 

« Still Lifes » was made possible in part by The Netherlands Foundation For Visual Arts, Design and Architecture

 

 Sienna Gallery
80 Main Street
Lenox, MA 01240 USA
(001) 413 637 8386

info@siennagallery.com

07/08/2010

COUP de … ROUGE avec Viktoria Münzker-Ferus

Classé dans : Allemagne (DE),COUP DE COEUR,Viktoria MUNZKER (SK/AT) — bijoucontemporain @ 0:02

Viktoria Münzker   TOUGH LOVE pieces

des pièces cousues au petit-point de fil rouge, comme une blessure, ou comme la réparation d’une blessure …. « I have sewn the wounds but the scars have remained … »

http://2.bp.blogspot.com/_m5mhyTVbjV4/TDs4kBqgaTI/AAAAAAAACCk/PPAIgDfv8P8/s1600/tough+love+pieces+043.jpg

Viktoria Münzker - necklace ‘Manuel’

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_m5mhyTVbjV4/TDs4Z8fazUI/AAAAAAAACCM/1N5-RN12I-A/s1600/tough+love+pieces+034.jpg
Viktoria Münzker - « When I grow up » 

http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_m5mhyTVbjV4/TDs4Pp1zrtI/AAAAAAAACB0/4kvdN82cdxo/s1600/tough+love+pieces+025.jpg
Viktoria Münzker - « no way out »

http://4.bp.blogspot.com/_m5mhyTVbjV4/TDs4I1PXz3I/AAAAAAAACBk/FMht6H3rvkE/s1600/tough+love+pieces+021.jpghttp://1.bp.blogspot.com/_m5mhyTVbjV4/TDs4MNdLR2I/AAAAAAAACBs/SVrx0ZjCOBs/s1600/tough+love+pieces+022.jpg

http://1.bp.blogspot.com/_m5mhyTVbjV4/TDs4E3Pc-4I/AAAAAAAACBc/LBV6EoTFWm4/s1600/tough+love+pieces+016.jpg
Viktoria Münzker - « C’mon ring « 

http://blog.alchimia.it/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/36969_1474423737193_1131675561_1347396_6627124_n.jpg

http://blog.alchimia.it/wp-content/uploads/2010/06/36969_1474425497237_1131675561_1347413_5133722_n.jpg

 

« TOUGH LOVE exhibition » by Michelle Kraemer & Viktoria Münzker — June 2010
Atelier StossimHimmel, Stoss im Himmel 3, 1010 Wien

 

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